Data Smog: Surviving the Information Glut

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Harper Collins, 13.10.2009. - 256 страница

Media scholar ( and Internet Enthusiast ) David Shenk examines the troubling effects of information proliferation on our bodies, our brains, our relationships, and our culture, then offers strikingly down-to-earth insights for coping with the deluge.

With a skillful mixture of personal essay, firsthand reportage, and sharp analysis, Shenk illustrates the central paradox of our time: as our world gets more complex, our responses to it become increasingly simplistic. He draws convincing links between data smog and stress distraction, indecision, cultural fragmentation, social vulgarity, and more.

But there's hope for a saner, more meaningful future, as Shenk offers a wealth of novel prescriptions—both personal and societal—for dispelling data smog.

 

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LibraryThing Review

Коментар посетиоца странице  - ABVR - LibraryThing

Data Smog (the concept) is an elegant and useful addition to the language of the Information Age. Data Smog (the book) is an intermittently useful but decidedly inelegant addition to the swelling ... Прочитајте целу рецензију

Data smog: surviving the information glut

Коментар посетиоца странице  - Not Available - Book Verdict

In this engaging look at some of the side effects of the Information Age, Shenk convincingly argues that the reality of "data smog," or information overload, is surely leading to more societal ills ... Прочитајте целу рецензију

Садржај

Chapter 15
Chapter 16
PART 4
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
chapter 19
chapter 20
Chapter 21

Chapter 5
Chapter 6
Chapter 7
Chapter 8
Chapter 9
Chapter 10
Chapter 11
PART 3
Chapter 12
Chapter 13
Chapter 14
Chapter 22
Acknowledgments
TechnorealismAn Overview
How to Get Off Junk MailPhone Lists
Sources and Notes
Searchable Terms
About the Author
PRAISE FOR DATA SMOG
Copyright
About the Publisher
Ауторска права

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О аутору (2009)

David Shenk, a former Freedom Forum fellow, has written for Wired, Harper's, The New Republic, the New York Times and the Washington Post, and is a commentator for National Public Radio's "All Things Considered."

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