Слике страница
PDF
ePub

MISER. MISERY.

MISER.

BUT the base miser starves amidst his store,
Broods o'er his gold, and griping still at more,
Sits sadly pining, and believes he's poor.

'Tis strange the miser should his care employ To gain those riches he can ne'er enjoy.

Their crimes on gold shall misers lay,
Who've pawn'd their sordid souls away?
Let bravoes, then, whose blood is spilt,
Upbraid the passive sword with guilt.

Dryden.

437

The miser lives alone, abhorred by all
Like a disease, yet cannot so be 'scaped,
But, canker-like, eats through the poor men's hearts
That live about him; never has commerce
With any, but to ruin them.

May.

Pope.

I pray thee, deal with men in misery,
Like one who may himself be miserable.

MISERY.

THOU, who to Pindas tak'st thy way,

Where hangs my harp upon the cypress tree,
Salute it in my name,
and say,
I am bow'd down by years and misery.

The kindly throbs that other men control,
Ne'er melt the iron of the miser's soul;
Through life's dark road his sordid way he wends,
An incarnation of fat dividends.

Sprague.

Gay.

Tasso.

Heywood.

To tell thy mis'ries will no comfort breed;
Men help thee most, that think thou hast no need;
But if the world once thy misfortunes know,
Thou soon shalt lose a friend and find a foe.

Randolph.

438

MISFORTUNE. MISSION.

MISFORTUNE.

IN struggling with misfortune lies the proof
Of virtue.

Shakspere.

Misfortune does not always wait on vice,
Nor is success the constant guest of virtue.

MISSION-MISSIONARIES.

Havard.

Oh! mortals, short of sight, who think the past
O'er-blown misfortune still shall prove the last;
Alas! misfortunes travel in a train,
And oft in life form one perpetual chain;
Fear buries fear, and ills on ills attend,
Till life and sorrow meet one common end.

Young

On a mission, on a mission,

To declare the coming vision.-E. B. Browning.

The warriors of Messiah, messengers

Of peace, and light, and life; whose eye, unsealed,
Saw up the path of immortality,

Far into bliss, saw men, immortal men,
Wide wandering from the way eclipsed in night,.
Dark, moonless, moral night; living like beasts,
Like beasts descending to the grave, untaught
Of life to come, unsanctified, unsaved;

Who strong, though seeming weak; who warlike, though Unarmed with bow and sword; appearing mad, Though sounder than the schools alone e'er made The doctor's head; devote to God and truth.-Pollok.

Great Britain has her sons, both frank and brave,
Who noble triumphs win but wear no glave;
Sons who in heart are firm, in toil are free,
To spread her glorious name from sea to sea!
Nor strife, nor tribute, nor oppressive sway
Degrade their labours, nor obstruct their way!
Their watchword still-Let war and sorrow cease;
Their noblest epithet-The men of peace!

Dr. Wm. Beattie.

MISTAKE. MISTRESS. MISTRUST.

MISTAKE.

How man eternally false judgments makes,
And all his joys and sorrows are mistakes.

Fools into the notion fall,

That vice or virtue there is none at all;
Ask your own heart, and nothing is so plain,
'Tis to mistake them costs the time and pain.

Mistaken Brutus thought to break the yoke,
But cut the bond of union with that stroke.

MISTRESS.

439

Young.

MISTRUST.

By a divine instinct men's minds mistrust
Ensuing dangers; as by proof we see
The waters swell before a boisterous storm.

Pope.

Waller.

LIKE a lily,

That once was mistress of the field, and flourished, I'll hang my head, and perish. Shakspere.

Wonder not sov'reign mistress! if perhaps
Thou can'st, who art sole wonder; much less arm
Thy looks, the heaven of mildness, with disdain.

Milton.

Then, gentle Clarence, welcome unto Warwick;
And welcome Somerset:-I hold it cowardice
To rest mistrustful where a noble heart
Hath pawn'd an open hand in sign of love.

Shakspere.

Shakspere.

Not then mistrust, but tender love, enjoins
That I should mind thee oft; and mind thou me.

Milton.

.440

MIXTURE. MOCKERY. MODERATION.

MIXTURE.

AIR, and ye elements, the eldest born
Of nature's womb, that in quaternion run,
Perpetual circle multiform; and mix
And nourish all things.

Monastic beards, and shaven crowns,
And capes, and hoods, and friars' gowns,
I find enough; but must confess
Few men are worthy of their dress.
I do not like, upon one dish,

A mixture strange of fowl and fish;
Nor can I understand aright,

Milton.

A knightly monk, or monkish knight.
Gostick, from the German, Reinmar Von Zweter.

MOCKERY.

WHAT cannot be preserved when fortune takes,
Patience her injury a mockery makes.

Shakspere,

Many thousand widows

Will this mock, mock out of their dear husbands, Mock mothers from their sons, mock castles down. Shakspere.

He will not

Mock us with his blest sight, then snatch him hence Soon shall we see our hopes return. Milton.

Equally inured

By moderation, either state to bear,
Prosperous or adverse.

MODERATION.

I'D have you sober and contain yourself,
Not that your sail be bigger than your boat;
But moderate your expenses now, at first,
As you may keep the same proportion still.

Ben Jonson.

Milton.

In moderation placing all my glory,

While tories call me whig, and whigs a tory.—Pope.

MODESTY.

MODESTY.

BUT her sad eyes still fastened on the ground,
Are governed with goodly modesty,
That suffers not one look to glance awry,
Which may let in a thought unsound.

441

Spenser.

Maidens in modesty say No, to that

Which they would have the profferers construe, Aye.

Shakspere.

He saw her charming, but he saw not half
The charms her downcast modesty conceal'd.

Can it be

That modesty may more betray our sense,
Than woman's lightness: having waste ground enough,
Shall we desire to raze the sanctuary,
And pitch our evils there.

Shakspere.

Thomson.

True modesty is a discerning grace,
And only blushes at the proper place;
But counterfeit is blind, and skulks through fear,
Where 't is ashamed to be ashamed to appear.

Cowper.

It is a harder thing for men to rate,
Their own parts at an equal estimate,
Than cast up fractions, in th' attempt of heav'n,
Of time and motion, and adjust them ev'n;
For modest persons never had a true
Particular of all that is their due.

Butler.

Look, look! the summer rises in her cheeks!
A blush as hot as June comes flooding o'er
Her too proud paleness. Burning modesty
Warms all her brow, and beauty quite abashed
Drops her twin stars to earthward.

Procter,

Modesty's the charm

That coldest hearts can quickest warm;
Which all our best affections gains,

And gaining ever still retains.-J. K. Paulding.

« ПретходнаНастави »