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LIST OF TREATIES AND CONVENTIONS CONTAINED IN THIS

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Special agreement with Great Britain relating to the North Atlantic Coast fisheries. Signed at

Washington January 27, 1909; confirmed by exchange of notes March 4, 1909...
Convention with the Netherlands for the settlement of disputes by arbitration. Signed at Wash-

ington May 2, 1908; proclaimed March 25, 1909...
Convention with Denmark for the settlement of disputes by arbitration. Signed at Washington

May 18, 1909; proclaimed March 29, 1909...
Convention with China for the settlement of disputes by arbitration. Signed at Washington

October 8, 1908; proclaimed April 6, 1909..
Convention with Austria-Hungary for the settlement of disputes by arbitration. Signed at Wash-

ington January 15, 1909; proclaimed May 18, 1909
Naturalization convention with Honduras. Signed at Tegucigalpa June 23, 1908; proclaimed

June 8, 1909.
Agreement with Russia relating to status of corporations. Signed at Saint Petersburg June 25/12,

1904; proclaimed June 15, 1909
Naturalization convention with Uruguay. Signed at Montevideo August 10, 1908; proclaimed

June 19, 1909.
Convention with Peru for the settlement of disputes by arbitration. Signed at Washington

December 5, 1908; proclaimed June 30, 1909.
Convention with Salvador for the settlement of disputes by arbitration. Signed at Washington

December 21, 1908; proclaimed July 7, 1909
Convention with Costa Rica for the settlement of disputes by arbitration. Signed at Washington

January 13, 1909; proclaimed July 21, 1909
Patent agreement with Germany. Signed at Washington February 23, 1909; proclaimed August

1, 1909

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TREATIES AND CONVENTIONS.

January 27, 1909.

Special agreement between United States and Great Britain relating to North Atlantic Coast fisheries. Signed at Washington January 27, 1909; ratification advised by the Senate February 18, 1909; confirmed by exchange of notes March 4, 1909.

ARTICLE I.

North Atlantic fisheries under Conven

Public

p. 298

Whereas, by Article I of the Convention signed at London on the 20th day of October, 1818, between the United States and Great tion of $15.

Preamble. Britain, it was agreed as follows:

Treaties, Whereas differences have arisen respecting the Liberty claimed by the United States for the Inhabitants thereof, to take, dry and cure Fish on Certain Coasts, Bays, Harbours and Creeks of His Britannic Majesty's Dominions in America, it is agreed between the High Contracting Parties, that the Inhabitants of the said United States shall have forever, in common with the Subjects of His Britannic Majesty, the Liberty to take Fish of every kind on that part of the Southern Coast of Newfoundland which extends from Cape Řay to the Rameau Islands, on the Western and Northern Coast of Newfoundland, from the said Cape Ray to the Quirpon Islands on the shores of the Magdalen Islands, and also on the Coasts, Bays, Harbours, and Creeks from Mount Joly on the Southern Coast of Labrador, to and through the Straits of Belleisle and thence Northwardly indefinitely along the Coast, without prejudice however, to any of the exclusive Rights of the Hudson Bay Company; and that the American Fishermen shall also have liberty forever, to dry and cure Fish in any of the unsettled Bays, Harbours, and Creeks of the Southern part of the Coast of Newfoundland hereabove described, and of the Coast of Labrador; but so soon as the same, or any Portion thereof, shall be settled, it shall not be lawful for the said Fishermen to dry or cure Fish at such Portion so settled, without previous agreement for such purpose with the Inhabitants, Proprietors, or Possessors of the ground.-And the United States hereby renounce forever, any Liberty heretofore enjoyed or claimed by the Inhabitants thereof, to take, dry, or cure Fish on, or within three marine Miles of any of the Coasts, Bays, Creeks, or Harbours of His Britannic Majesty's Dominions in America not included within the above mentioned limits; provided, however, that the American Fishermen shall be admitted to enter such Bays or Harbours for the purpose of Shelter and of repairing Damages therein, of purchasing Wood, and of obtaining Water, and for no other purpose whatever. But they shall be under such Restrictions as may be necessary to prevent their taking, drying or curing Fish therein, or in any other manner whatever abusing the Privileges hereby reserved to them.

And, whereas, differences have arisen as to the scope and meaning Differences of the said Article, and of the liberties therein referred to, and other- tion.

scope, etc., of Convenwise in respect of the rights and liberties which the inhabitants of the United States have or claim to have in the waters or on the shores therein referred to: It is agreed that the following questions shall be submitted for Questions to be sub

mitted to arbitration. decision to a tribunal of arbitration constituted as hereinafter provided: Question 1. To what extent are the following contentions or either

Common rights. of them justified?

It is contended on the part of Great Britain that the exercise of the Contention of Great liberty to take fish referred to in the said Article, which the inhabitants of the United States have forever in common with the subjects of His Britannic Majesty, is subject, without the consent of the United States, to reasonable regulation by Great Britain, Canada, or Newfoundland

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Britain.

United States.

in the form of municipal laws, ordinances, or rules, as, for example, to regulations in respect of (1) the hours, days, or seasons when fish may be taken on the treaty coasts; (2) the method, means, and implements to be used in the taking of fish or in the carrying on of fishing operations on such coasts; (3) any other matters of a similar character relating to fishing; such regulations being reasonable, as being, for instance--

(a) Appropriate or necessary for the protection and preservation of such fisheries and the exercise of the rights of British subjects therein and of the liberty which by the said Article I the inhabitants of the United States have therein in common with British subjects; (b) Desirable on grounds of public order and morals;

Equitable and fair as between local fishermen and the inhabitants of the United States exercising the said treaty liberty and not so framed as to give unfairly an advantage to the former over the latter class.

It is contended on the part of the United States that the exercise of such liberty is not subject to limitations or restraints by Great Britain, Canada, or Newfoundland in the form of municipal laws, ordinances, or regulations in respect of (1) the hours, days, or seasons when the inhabitants of the United States may take fish on the treaty coasts, or (2) the method, means, and implements used by them in taking fish or in carrying on fishing operations on such coasts, or (3) any other limitations or restraints of similar character

(a) Unless they are appropriate and necessary for the protection and preservation of the common rights in such fisheries and the exercise thereof; and

(6) Unless they are reasonable in themselves and fair as between local fishermen and fishermen coming from the United States, and not so framed as to give an advantage to the former over the latter class; and

(c) Unless their appropriateness, necessity, reasonableness, and fairness be determined by the United States and Great Britain by

common accord and the United States concurs in their enforcement. Employment of Question 2. Have the inhabitants of the United States, while exer

cising the liberties referred to in said Article, a right to employ as members of the fishing crews of their vessels persons not inhabitants of the United States ?

Question 3. Can the exercise by the inhabitants of the United States of the liberties referred to in the said Article be subjected, without the consent of the United States, to the requirements of entry or report at custom-houses or the payment of light or harbor or other dues, or to any other similar requirement or condition or

exaction? Shelter, repairs, Question 4. Under the provision of the said Article that the Ameri

can fishermen shall be admitted to enter certain bays or harbors for shelter, repairs, wood, or water, and for no other purpose whatever, but that they shall be under such restrictions as may be necessary to prevent their taking, drying, or curing fish therein or in any other manner whatever abusing the privileges thereby reserved to them, is it permissible to impose restrictions making the exercise of such privileges conditional upon the payment of light or harbor or other dues, or entering or reporting at custom-houses or any similar conditions?

Question 5. From where must be measured the “three marine miles of any of the coasts, bays, creeks, or harbors” referred to in the said

Article? Taking fish on New- Question 6. Have the inhabitants of the United States the liberty

crews.

custom

Entry houses, etc.

wood, or water.

Marine league.

under the said Article or otherwise, to take fish in the bays, harbors, and creeks on that part of the southern coast of Newfoundland which

foundland, or Magdalen Islands.

Commercial privileges.

extends from Cape Ray to Rameau Islands, or on the western and northern coasts of Newfoundland from Cape Ray to Quirpon Islands, or on the Magdalen Islands?

Question 7. Are the inhabitants of the United States whose vessels resort to the treaty coasts for the purpose of exercising the liberties referred to in Article I of the treaty of 1818 entitled to have for those vessels, when duly authorized by the United States in that behalf, the commercial privileges on the treaty coasts accorded by agreement or otherwise to United States trading vessels generally?

ARTICLE II.

Inconsistent legislation to be presented.

Commission to re. port on reasonableness

Either Party may call the attention of the Tribunal to any legislative or executive act of the other Party, specified within three months of the exchange of notes enforcing this agreement, and which is claimed to be inconsistent with the true interpretation of the treaty of 1818; and may call upon the Tribunal to express in its award its opinion upon such acts, and to point out in what respects, if any, they are inconsistent with the principles laid down in the award in reply to the preceding questions; and each Party agrees to conform to such opinion.

ARTICLE III. If any question arises in the arbitration regarding the reasonableness of any regulation or otherwise which requires an examination of regulations. of the practical effect of any provisions in relation to the conditions surrounding the exercise of the liberty of fishery enjoyed by the inhabitants of the United States, or which requires expert information about the fisheries themselves, the Tribunal may, in that case, refer such question to a commission of three expert specialists in such matters; one to be designated by each of the Parties hereto, and the hird, who shall not be a national of either Party, to be designated by the Tribunal. This Commission shall examine into and report their conclusions on any question or questions so referred to it by the Tribunal and such report shall be considered by the Tribunal and shall, if incorporated by them in the award, be accepted as a part thereof.

Pending the report of the Commission upon the question or ques- portof commission tions so referred and without awaiting such report, the Tribunal may make a separate award upon all or any other questions before it, and such separate award, if made, shall become immediately effective, provided that the report aforesaid shall not be incorporated in the award until it has been considered by the Tribunal. The expenses of such Commission shall be borne in equal moieties by the Parties hereto.

ARTICLE IV. The Tribunal shail recommend for the consideration of the High Contracting Parties rules and a method of procedure under which all questions which may arise in the future regarding the exercise of the liberties above referred to may be determined in accordance with the principles laid down in the award. If the High Contracting Parties shall not adopt the rules and method of procedure so recommended, or if they shall not, subsequently to the delivery of the award, agree upon such rules and methods, then any differences which may arise in the future between the High Contracting Parties relating to the interpretation of the treaty of 1818 or to the effect and application of the award of the Tribunal shall be referred informally to the Permanent Court at The Hague for decision by the summary procedure provided in Chapter IV of The Hague Convention of the 18th of October, 1907.

Award pending re

Procedure.

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