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section 4 of section 21 of "The Merchant Shipping Act, 1854," and when so ascertained shall be entered by him in the ship's official log-book, and also in a memorandum which he shall deliver to the master, and the master shall, when the said dues are demanded, produce such memorandum in like manner as if it were the certiñcate of registry, or, in the case of a foreign ship, the document equivalent to a certificate of registry, and in default shall be liable to the same penalty as if he had failed to produce the said certificate or document.

24. After the 1st day of November, 1876, if a ship, British or foreign, arrives between the last day of October and the 16th day of April in any year at any port in the United Kingdom from any port out of the United Kingdom, carrying as deck cargo, that is to say, in any uncovered space upon deck, or in any covered space not included in the cubical contents forming the ship's registered tonnage, any wood goods coming within the following descriptions, that is to say:

(a.) Any square, round, waney, or other timber, or any pitch pine, mahogany, oak, teak, or other heavy wood goods whatever; or

(b.) Any more than five spare spars or store spars, whether or not made, dressed, and finally prepared for use; or

(c.) Any deals, battens, or other light wood goods of any description to a height exceeding three feet above the deck; the master of the ship, and also the owner, if he is privy to the offence, shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding 5l. for every hundred cubic feet of wood goods carried in contravention of this section, and such penalty may be recovered by action or on indictment, or to an amount not exceeding 100%. (whatever may be the maximum penalty recoverable) on summary conviction.

Provided that a master or owner shall not be liable to any penalty under this section

(1.) In respect of any wood goods which the master has considered it necessary to place or keep on deck during the voyage on account of the springing of any leak, or of any other damage to the ship received or apprehended; or

(2.) If he proves that the ship sailed from the port at which the wood goods were loaded as deck cargo at such time before the last day of October as allowed a sufficient interval, according to the ordinary duration of the voyage, for the ship to arrive before that day at the said port in the United Kingdom, but was prevented from so arriving by stress of weather or circumstances beyond his control; or

(3.) If he proves that the ship sailed from the port at which the wood goods were loaded as deck cargo at such time before the 16th day of April as allowed a reasonable interval, according to the

ordinary duration of the voyage, for the ship to arrive after that day at the said port in the United Kingdom, and by reason of an exceptionally favourable voyage arrived before that day.

Provided further, that nothing in this section shall affect any ship not bound to any port in the United Kingdom which comes into any port of the United Kingdom under stress of weather, or for repairs, or for any other purpose than the delivery of her cargo.

Deck and Load Lines.

25. Every British ship (except ships under 80 tons register employed solely in the coasting trade, ships employed solely in fishing, and pleasure yachts) shall be permanently and conspicuously marked with lines of not less than 12 inches in length and 1 inch in breadth, painted longitudinally on each side amidships, or as near thereto as is practicable, and indicating the position of each deck which is above water.

The upper edge of each of these lines shall be level with the upper side of the deck plank next the waterway at the place of marking.

The lines shall be white or yellow on a dark ground, or black on a light ground.

26. With respect to the marking of a load-line on British ships, the following provisions shall have effect:

(1.) The owner of every British ship (except ships under 80 tons register employed solely in the coasting trade, ships employed solely in fishing, and pleasure yachts) shall, before entering his ship outwards from any port in the United Kingdom upon any voyage for which he is required so to enter her, or, if that is not practicable, as soon after as may be, mark upon each of her sides amidships, or as near thereto as is practicable, in white or yellow on a dark ground, or in black on a light ground, a circular disc 12 inches in diameter, with a horizontal line 18 inches in length drawn through its centre. (2.) The centre of this disc shall indicate the maximum load-line in salt water to which the owner intends to load the ship for that voyage.

(3.) He shall also, upon so entering her, insert in the form of entry delivered to the collector or other principal officer of Customs a statement in writing of the distance in feet and inches between the centre of this disc and the upper edge of each of the lines indicating the position of the ship's decks which is above that centre.

(4.) If default is made in delivering this statement in the case of any ship, any officer of Customs may refuse to enter the ship outwards.

(5.) The master of the ship shall enter a copy of this statement in the agreement with the crew before it is signed by any member of

the crew, and no superintendent of any mercantile marine office shall proceed with the engagement of the crew until this entry is made.

(6.) The master of the ship shall also enter a copy of this statement in the official log-book.

(7.) When a ship has been marked as by this section required, she shall be kept so marked until her next return to a port of discharge in the United Kingdom.

27. With respect to the marking of a load-line on British ships employed in the coasting trade, the following provisions shall have effect:

(1.) The owner of every British ship employed in the coasting trade on the coasts of the United Kingdom (except ships under 80 tons register employed solely in that trade) shall, before proceeding to sea from any port, mark upon each of her sides amidships, or as near thereto as is practicable, in white or yellow on a dark ground, or in black on a light ground, a circular disc 12 inches in diameter, with a horizontal line 18 inches in length drawn through its centre.

(2.) The centre of this disc shall indicate the maximum load-line in salt water to which the owner intends to load the ship, until notice is given of an alteration.

(3.) He shall also once in every 12 months, immediately before the ship proceeds to sea, send or deliver to the collector or other principal officer of Customs of the port of registry of the ship a statement in writing of the distance in feet and inches between the centre of the disc and the upper edge of each of the lines indicating the position of the ship's decks which is above that centre.

(4.) The owner, before the ship proceeds to sea after any renewal or alteration of the disc, shall send or deliver to the collector or other principal officer of Customs of the port of registry of the ship notice in writing of such renewal or alteration, together with such statement in writing as before mentioned of the distance between the centre of the disc and the upper edge of each of the deck-lines.

(5.) If default is made in sending or delivering any notice or statement required by this section to be sent or delivered, the owner shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding 1007.

(6.) When a ship has been marked as by this section required, she shall be kept so marked until notice is given of an alteration.

28. Any owner or master of a British ship who neglects to cause his ship to be marked as by this Act required, or to keep her so marked, or who allows the ship to be so loaded as to submerge in salt water the centre of the disc, and any person who conceals removes, alters, defaces, or obliterates, or suffers any person under his control to conceal, remove, alter, deface, or obliterate any of the said marks, except in the event of the particulars thereby denoted

being lawfully altered, or except for the purpose of escaping capture by an enemy, shall for each offence incur a penalty not exceeding 1007.

If any of the marks required by this Act is in any respect inaccurate, so as to be likely to mislead, the owner of the ship shall incur a penalty not exceeding 1007.

Investigations into Shipping Casualties.

29. For the purpose of rendering investigations into shipping casualties more speedy and effectual, it shall be lawful for the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain to appoint from time to time some fit person or persons to be a wreck commissioner or wreck commissioners for the United Kingdom, so that there shall not be more than three such commissioners at any one time, and to remove any such wreck commissioner; and in case it shall become necessary to appoint a wreck commissioner in Ireland the Lord Chancellor of Ireland shall have the appointment and the power of removal of such wreck commissioner.

It shall be the duty of a wreck commissioner, at the request of the Board of Trade, to hold any formal investigation into a loss, abandonment, damage, or casualty (in this Act called a shipping casualty) under the eighth part of "The Merchant Shipping Act, 1854," and for that purpose he shall have the same jurisdiction and powers as are thereby conferred on two justices, and all the provisions of "The Merchant Shipping Acts, 1854 to 1876," with respect to investigations conducted under the eighth part of "The Merchant Shipping Act, 1854," shall apply to investigations held by a wreck commissioner.

30. The wreck commissioner, justices, or other authority holding a formal investigation into a shipping casualty, shall hold the same with the assistance of an assessor or assessors of nautical engineering or other special skill or knowledge, to be appointed by the commissioner, justices, or authority out of a list of persons for the time being approved for the purpose by a Secretary of State.

The commissioner, justices, or authority when of opinion that the investigation is likely to involve the cancellation or suspension of the certificate of a master or mate, shall, where practicable, appoint a person having experience in the merchant service to be one of the assessors.

Each assessor shall either sign the report made on the investigation, or report to the Board of Trade his reasons for his dissent therefrom.

The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain may from time to time, with the consent of the Treasury so far as relates to fees, make, and when made revoke, alter, and add to general rules for

carrying into effect the enactments relating to formal investigations into shipping casualties, and in particular with respect to the summoning of assessors, the procedure, the parties, the persons allowed to appear, the notice to such parties and persons or to persons affected, and the amount and application of fees.

All such rules, while in force, shall have effect as if enacted in this Act.

Every formal investigation into a shipping casualty shall be conducted in such manner that if a charge is made against any person that person shall have an opportunity of making a defence.

31. A wreck commissioner may, at the request of the Board of Trade, by himself, or by some deputy approved by the Board of Trade, institute the same examination as a receiver of wreck under section 448 of "The Merchant Shipping Act, 1854," and shall for that purpose have the powers by that section conferred on a receiver of wreck.

32. In the following cases

(1.) Whenever any ship on or near the coasts of the United Kingdom, or any British ship elsewhere, has been stranded or damaged, and any witness is found at any place in the United Kingdom, or

(2.) Whenever a British ship has been lost, or is supposed to have been lost, and any evidence can be obtained in the United Kingdom as to the circumstances under which she proceeded to sea or was last heard of,

the Board of Trade (without prejudice to any other powers) may, if they think fit, cause an inquiry to be made or formal investigation to be held, and all the provisions of "The Merchant Shipping Acts, 1854 to 1876," shall apply to any such inquiry or investigation as if it had been made or held under the eighth part of "The Merchant Shipping Act, 1854."

33. A formal investigation into a shipping casualty may be held at any place appointed in that behalf by the Board of Trade, and all enactments relating to the authority holding the investigation shall, for the purpose of the investigation, have effect as if the place so appointed were a place appointed for the exercise of the ordinary jurisdiction of that authority.

Miscellaneous.

34. Where under "The Merchant Shipping Acts, 1854 to 1876," or any of them, a ship is authorized or ordered to be detained, any commissioned officer on full pay in the naval or military service of Her Majesty, or any officer of the Board of Trade or Customs, or any British Consular Officer may detain the ship, and if the ship after such detention, or after service on the master of any notice of

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