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Act of July 6, 1812 (2 Stats., 784).

AN ACT making further provisions for the Army of the United States, and for other

purposes.

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SEC. 2. That to any army of the United States, other than that in which the Inspector-General

of the Army shall serve, it shall be lawful for the President to appoint deputy inspector-general,

who shall be taken from the line of the Army, and who shall each, in addition to his pay and other emoluments, be entitled to fifty dollars per month, which shall be in full compensation for his extra services. And that there shall be, to each of the foregoing deputies, such number of assistant deputies (not exceeding three to each department) as the public service may require, who shall, in like manner, be taken from the line, and who shall, each, be entitled to thirty dollars per month, in addition to his pay and other emoluments, which shall be in full compensation for his extra services:

And provided also, That the President of the United States be, and he is hereby, authorized to appoint any of the officers named in this act during the recess of the Senate, to be submitted to the Senate at their next meeting for their advice and consent.

Sec. 3. That all letters and packages to and from the Inspector-General shall be free from postage.

Act of March 3, 1813 (2 Stats., 819).

AN ACT for the better organization of the general staff of the Army of the United

States.
That the
Inspector-General's

departments shall consist of the following officers, that is to say, an Adjutant and InspectorGeneral, with the rank, pay, and emolument of a brigadier-general, and not exceeding

eight inspectors-general, sixteen assistant inspectors-general.

SEC. 2. That the President of the United States be, and is hereby, authorized, if he shall deem it expedient, to assign one of the brigadiersgeneral to the principal Army of the United States, who shall, in such case, act as Adjutant and Inspector-General, and as chief of staff of such Army. SEC. 3. That

all the other inspectors-general sball have the brevet rank and the pay and emoluments of a colonel of infantry; the

assistant inspectors-general : shall have the brevet rank and the pay and emoluments of a major of cavalry. Sec. 4. That

the assistant inspectors-general shall be taken from the line. The

inspectors-general may be taken from the line or not, as the President may deem expedient.

Sec. 11. That all letters and packets to and from the Adjutant and Inspector-General, inspectors-general,

which relate to their official duties, shall be free from postage.

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Act of March 3, 1815 (3 Stats., 224).

AN ACT fixing the military peace establishment of the United States.

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SEC. 3. That there shall be

four brigade inspectors. The brigade inspectors appointed under this act shall be taken from the line.

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May 17, 1815.

And the President of the United States has further judged proper, that, in addition to the provision for a general staff, which is specifically made by the act of Congress, certain officers shall be retained, under the special authority given by the act, until circumstances will permit of their discharge, without material iniurv to the service; and that the following shall be the

GENERAL STAFF.

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An adjutant and Inspector-General, to be provisionally retained.
Four brigade inspectors.

(General Orders, A. and I. G.'s Office.)

Act of April 24, 1816 (3 Stats., 297). AN ACT for organizing the general staff and making further provisions for the

Army of the United States. That, in addition to the act providing for a military peace establishment, the provisions of the act of March the third, one thousand eight hundred and thirteen, for the better organization of the general staff be, and the same are hereby, so far established that the general staff shall in future consist of one adjutant and inspector general of the Army, and

one inspector-general ... and an assistant to every brigade, which shall supersede the brigade inspectors now existing.

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SEC. 5. That the pay and emoluments of the inspector-generals of divisions be, and is hereby, raised to be equal to the pay and emoluments of the adjutant-generals of division.

Act of March 2, 1821 (3 Stats., 615).

AN ACT to reduce and fix the military peace establishment of the United States.

SEC. 6. That there shall be

two inspectors-general, with the rank, pay, and emoluments of colonels of cavalry.

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Act of March 3, 1825 (4 Stats., 127). AN ACT to authorize the sale of unserviceable ordnance, arms, and military stores.

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SEC. 2. That the inspection or survey of the unserviceable stores shall be made by an inspector-general or such other officer or officers as the Secretary of War may appoint for that purpose.

Act of March 2, 1827 (4 Stats., 238).
AN ACT amendatory of the act regulating the Post-Office Department.

SEC. 4. That the inspectors-general

be authorized to frank, and to receive letters and packets by post free of postage.

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Act of July 5, 1838 (5 Stats., 256). AN ACT to increase the present military establishment of the United States, and

for other purposes.

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Sec. 7. The President is authorized to appoint two assistant adjutantsgeneral, with the brevet rank of major, and four, with the brevet rank of captain, who shall be taken from the line of the army, and in addition to their own shall perform the duties of assistant inspectorsgeneral when the circumstances of the service may require.

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Act of August 23, 1842 (5 Stats., 512).
AN ACT respecting the organization of the Army, and for other purposes.

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SEC. 4. That within one month of the passage of this act the offices of one inspector-general

shall be abolished.

Act of January 12, 1846 (9 Stats., 2). AN ACT to repeal the act which abolished the office of one of the inspectors-general

of the Army, and to revive and establish said office. That so much of the fourth section of an act approved the twentythird day of August, one thousand eight hundred and forty-two, entitled "An act respecting the organization of the Army, and for other purposes," as directs that the office of one inspector-general of the Army shall be, and the same is hereby, repealed; and all acts and parts of acts so repealed shall be, and the same hereby are, revived and continued in force.

Act of August 3, 1861 (12 Stats., 287). AN ACT providing for the better organization of the military establishment.

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SEC. 2. That the President, be, and he is hereby, authorized to appoint, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, in addition to the number authorized by existing laws and in accordance with existing regulations, five assistant inspectors-general, with the rank and pay of majors of cavalry

to have the pay, rank, and allowance and perform the duties of similar officers in the present military establishment.

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AN ACT to promote the efficiency of the Engineer and Topographical Engineer

Corps, and for other purposes.

SEC. 4.1 That the President of the United States is hereby authorized to appoint two additional inspectors-general for the United States Army, said inspectors-general to have the same rank and receive the same pay and allowances as now provided by law for inspectorsgeneral.

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Act of July 17, 1862 (12 Stats., 597).

AN ACT to amend the act calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the Union,

suppress insurrection, and repel invasion, approved February twenty-eighth, seventeen hundred and ninety-five, and the act amendatory thereof, and for other purposes.

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Sec. 10. That each army corps shall have

one assistant inspector-general, who shall bear,

the rank of lieutenantcolonel, and who shall be assigned from the army or volunteer force by the President.

Act of July 28, 1866 (14 Stats., 3.3.2). AN ACT to increase and fix the military peace establishment of the United States.

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SEC. 11. That there shall be four inspectors-general of the Army, with the rank, pay, and emoluments of colonels of cavalry; three assistant inspectors-general, with the rank, pay, and emoluments of lieutenant-colonels of cavalry, and two assistant inspectors-general, with the rank, pay, and emoluments of majors of cavalry.

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Act of March 3, 1869 (15 Stats., 315). AN ACT making appropriations for the support of the Army for the year ending

June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and seventy, and for other purposes.

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SEC. 6. That, until otherwise directed by law, there shall be no new appointments and no promotions

in the Inspector-General's Department.

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1 Section 4 of this act is repealed by section 3 of act of same date (12 Stats., 318).

2 Inspectors-general to designate, from time to time, what articles shall be kept by the Subsistence Department for sale to enlisted men. Provision repealed .n section 1144, Revised Statutes.

Act of June 8, 1872 (17 Stats., 338). AN ACT to authorize an appointment in the Inspector-General's Department. That the President be, and hereby is, authorized to nominate, and, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to appoint Nelson H. Davis, of the Inspector-General's Department, to the rank and place therein to which he is entitled, and which he would have held had the law of promotions by seniority under the act of March third, eighteen hundred and fifty-one and the army regulations of eighteen hundred and sixty-three been carried out: Provided, That no officer in said department shall, by this act, be reduced from his present grade, nor shall any pay or allowance be made to any officer under it, except from the date of his confirmation: And prorided further, That no promotion to the grade of inspector-general shall hereafter be made until the number of inspectors-general is reduced to four.

Act of March 3, 1873 (17 Stats., 582). AN ACT to provide for the establishment of a military prison, and for its government.

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SEC. 5. That one of the inspectors of the Army shall, at least once in three months, visit the prison for the purpose of examining into books and all the affairs thereof, and ascertain whether the laws, rules, and regulations relating thereto are complied with, the officers are competent and faithful, and the convicts properly governed and employed, and at the same time treated with humanity and kindness. And it shall be the duty of the inspector, at once, to make full report thereof to the Secretary of War.

Act of June 16, 1874 (18 Stats., 77). AN ACT to authorize an appointment in the Inspector-General's Department.

Whereas a vacancy of lieutenant-colonel in the Inspector-General's Department of the Army originated on the thirteenth of June, eighteen hundred and sixty-seven, to which Major Absalom Baird was entitled to be promoted under the laws then in existence, but from which he was excluded by reason of another appointment in said department previously made, and whereas an act of Congress approved June eighth, eighteen hundred and seventy-two, which was passed with the intention of rectifying this wrong, has failed to secure to Major Baird his just rights: Therefore,

That the Presidert be, and hereby is, authorized to nominate and promote Absalom Baird to be lieutenant-colonel and assistant inspectorgeneral, to date from June thirteenth, eighteen hundred and sixtyseven; but no pay or allowance shall be made to him for any time prior to the passage of this act.

Act of June 23, 1874 (18 Stats., 244).

AN ACT reorganizing the several staff corps of the Army. That the Inspector-General's Department shall consist of one colonel, two lieutenant-colonels, and two majors, with the rank, pay, and emoluments of officers of said grades; that the Secretary of War may, in addition, detail officers of the line, not to exceed four, to act as inspectors-general: Provided, That officers of the line detailed as acting

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