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writers allow that 4000 of them fell, among whom there were only two of equestrian rank.

Such was the great battle of Bannockburn, which completely secured the independence of Scotland, established the family of Bruce on the throne, and inspired the English with such a dread of Scottish valour, that for many years they never would venture to oppose any number of Scotsmen in the field. Robert arailing himself of his present advantage, marched directly to England, and ravaged, without opposition, all the northern counties; besieged Carlisle, and took Berwick by assault. In return for some of his noble prisoners, he received his wife, his daughter, and sister, and all the Scottish nobles and gentlemen who had been prisoners since the reign of Edward I.; the liberty of his other captives was purchased at immense ransoms, which were a ner accession of wealth to the kingdom,

ADIEU TO FAIR SCOTLAND.

Adieu to fair Scotland, the land of my birth,
Farewell to your mountains, your glens, and the Firth;
To islands far distant I straitway am bound;
Where loud did the name of Columbus resound;
But enjoy the few moments while here I remain,
The cause of my leaving can never give pain.
But how can I part from all I love here?
My father, my mother, and kindred so dear?
Affection still whispers, abide in the north,
But duty commands with my John to go forth.
With submission 1 yield to the mandate above,
And set off with the man I most ardently love.

Contented I'll sail to Jamaica's warm lands,
Confiding my all in my dear husband's hands;

And when settl'd there in health, sickness, or mirth,
I'll think of dear Scotia the place of my birth.
But enjoy the few moments we still have to spare,
I'll then bid adieu to the friends that are here. *

* This beautiful piece, which breathes the air of Arcadian simplicity and tenderness, has been transmitted to us by a young Gentleman, with the following remarks:-" The subject of these verses is a young lady, lately resident in Fifeshire, whose amiable disposition, as well as her great personal and mental accomplishments, had commanded the esteem of all her acquaintance. A Gentleman from the West Indies, a friend of the author, had engaged her heart; and upon their marriage she left the land of her nativity, and all those mountains and valleys which the place of her birth had rendered dear to her, and which ever will be associated in her mind with the days of her youth, and with those companions, who, in the enjoyment of her company, used to ramble through the woods of Balgonie, and along the banks of the water of Leven, to accompany the object of her affections to the sultry climate of Jamaica, leaving many a youthful swain to lament her departure, and many a friend to feel the sensible blank her absence has produced. The author, conceiving what must be the struggle of her feelings upon such an occasion—feelings of parental and kindred affection, grappling with those of youthful love, and at the same time being well aware which of them would have the ascendency, composed the above verses,

and sent them to the young lady immediately after her marriage. They are here offered for insertion, without the knowledge of the lady or her husband; and conceiving that the same feelings must have a place in the bosom of every one who is situated in similar circumstances, it is supposed that they will be read with interest by many an individual, each associating with them in his own mind those friends whom his ardent wishes may still pursue over the trackless path of the mighty ocean.”

ADIEU MY LOV'D HARP.

TUNE—“ Lough Sheeling." Adieu my lov’d harp, for no more shall the vale Re-echo thy notes, as they float on the gale; No more melting pity shall sigh o'er thy string, Or love to thy tremblings so tenderly sing. When battle's fell strife launch'd its thunders afar, And valour's dark brow wore the honours of war, 'Twas thou breath'd the fame of the hero around, And

young emulation was wak’d by the sound. Ye daughters of Erin, soon comes the sad day, When over the turf where I sleep ye shall say“ Oh! still is the song we repaid with a tear, And silent the string that delighted the ear!”

FINIS.

INDEX

TO THE

ENGLISH SONGS,

IN THE ALPHABETICAL ORDER

OF

THE FIRST LINES.

AUTHORS.

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A BLOOMING flower my Julia chose,

53
A dying thrush young Edward chose,

94
Ah
ope, Lord Gregory, thy door,

Pindar,

124
Ah sigh not for love,

43
Ah sure a pair were never seen,

Sheridan, 133
Ah tell me ye swains,

95
Ah the shepherds mournful fate,

Hamilton, 143
All lovely on the sultry beach,

W. Wallace, 124
All in the downs the fleet was moor'd,

Gay, 150
Alone to the banks of the dark rolling Danube, · Campbell, 25
A rose tree full in bearing,

OʻKeeffe,

24
A simple swain of rustic mould,

106
one night in my garret I sat, Rogers,
As whistling o'er the fallow land,

145
Begone dull care,
Bright Chanticleer proclaims the dawn,

Dibdin, 149
Canst thon leave me thus, my Katy,

Burns,

96
Cease rude Boreas, blust'ring railer,

Steevens,

104
Come all ye jolly sailors bold,

Hoare, 58
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• 130

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42

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Come cheer up my lads,
Come each jolly fellow,
Come join with me ye rural swains,

A. Wilson, 127
Come let us dance and sing,

Coleman, 74
Could love be found in woman's breast,
Dark lours the night,

128
Deep in a vale a cottage stood,

8
Deep in the fountain of this beating heart,

57
Deserted by the waning moon,

Dibdin, 24
Don't you remember a poor peasant's daughter,
Drink to me only with thine eyes,

B. Jonson, . 136
Encompass'd in an angel's frame,

135
Ere around the huge oak that o'ershadows, O'Keefe,

28
Faint and wearily the way-worn traveller, Coleman, 76
Fair Ellen like a lily grew,

14
Fair modest flower of matchless worth, W. Reid 69
Fair Sally once the village pride,

81
Farewell my soul's best treasure,

110
Farewell to the land where the gloom of my glory, Byron, 61
Farewell thou stream that winding flows, Burns, 98
Fly not yet, 'tis just the hour,

T. Moore, . 139
For ever fortune wilt thou prove,

Thomson, 42
For England when with fav'ring gale,

Dibdin, 68
Friend of my soul this goblet sip,

108
From hope's fond dream,

89
From the white blossom'd sloe,

44
Go where glory waits thee,

T. Moore, . 85
Had I a heart for falsehood fram'd,

Sheridan, 21
Hail England, dear England,

L. Hunt,

117
Haste ye rankling cares away,

Cherry,

11
Here a sheer hulk lies poor Tom Bowling, Dibdin,

101
Here's to the maiden of blushing fifteen, Sheridan,

99
Her hair is like the golden clue,

120
Her mouth with a smile,

87
He was fam'd for deeds of arms,

47
Hope, no more thou soft beguiler,

103
Hope told a flattering tale,

72
How blest has my time been,

T. Moore,
How lovely the hour when the sun,

T. Wilson, . 153
How stands the glass around,

115
How sweet at close of eve,

103

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