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CHAP. XX.

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DEBATES ON THE NEW ADMINISTRATION IN THE HOUSE - OF COMMONS. · DEBATES ON THE SAME SUBJECT IN THE HOUSE OF LORDS. SPEECH OF THE EARL GREY.

THE BUDGET. CORN BILL. AMENDMENT OF

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THE DUKE OF WELLINGTON.

ABANDONMENT OF THE

BILL. DEBATES RESPECTING IT IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS. MR. ÇANNING'S ILLNESS, DEATH, AND FUNERAL.

The debates, conversations, or discussions which took place on the subject of the new Administration in the two Houses of Parliament amounted altogether to the number of fourteen. The History of the first in both Houses has already been given. That of the remaining twelve remains to be told. Mr. Canning having been present at those which occurred in the House of Commons himself, took care to answer the attacks to which he thought it necessary to reply. But in the other House of Parliament, where he was not present, attacks were made upon him, to which to this hour no answer has yet been given.

In some of these debates, the observations which were made degenerated into coarseness of abuse. Such observations it is not intended to notice ; for there is no advantage in snatching from oblivion the intemperate remarks of individuals, which were made in moments of excitement, which they themselves probably regret having made, and which in no way injured Mr. Canning's reputation.

Upon others, of a different description, some remarks must be offered.

In the House of Commons, the night following the first debate in the House of Lords, the debate originated with Mr. Dawson, who, in an irregular way, interrupted General Gascoyne in his speech upon the Shipping Interest, by stating that he had a question of considerable importance to put to the head of His Majesty's Government. At that moment, Mr. Canning was not in the House ; but while a few words were passing between Mr. Huskisson and Mr. Dawson, on the subject of his absence, he himself entered. Mr. Dawson then asked his question, which was,

“ whether any arrangement had “ been made, or was in contemplation, for filling up

the offices of Master of the Mint, Judge Advocate, and Surveyor General of the Woods “ and Forests?" To this question Mr. Canning

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returned the laconick answer, “ Yes,” an an. swer which was received with loud and reiterated cheering; and Mr. Dawson, professing his inability to understand what the cheering meant, proceeded “ for the sake of enabling himself to

. « make some observations,” to move “ that an “ address should be presented to the King, “ praying that copies of the Commissions of the “ Master of the Mint and Judge Advocate “ might be laid before the House.”

The only portion of the Honourable Member's speech of any importance, is that in which he urged the necessity of the Catholick Question being immediately brought forward by the new Government, and its supporters.

Mr. Brougham rose to “ second” the motion, and after having complimented Mr. Dawson upon the “unblushing openness of his factious cons duct,” proceeded to expose the fallacy of the reasoning by which he had attempted to shew, that it was the bounden duty of the supporters of the Catholick claims, who had joined the Government, to bring forward immediately a motion in their favour. “ The Catholicks," said the learned Gentleman, " had too often, he was “ afraid, taken a lesson of indiscretion from their “ friends; let them now take a second lesson, “ a wiser one, from the advice and tuition of “ the Honourable Member for Derry (Mr. Daw“son); for if the Catholicks could doubt now,

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“ for a moment, they must be mad — literally “ and absolutely mad, -that the especial course " calculated to ruin their interests, was for them “ to follow the advice which that Honourable « Gentleman and his friends threw out to them. “ Let the Catholicks, if they have feared their

hostility, let them now on every account be “ apprehensive of their friendship. Let them “ trust to the effects of time, and of discussion, “ of better lights breaking out in various ways, “ and freer opinions, in England. Let them

rely upon the effect of their own forbearance, “ of their abstinence from offensive and provok.

ing topicks. Let them suspect bad advisers, “ and endeavour to conciliate the hostility of “ those, who opposed them from honest and sin“ cere prejudices; let them avoid the counsels “ and seductions of rash and intemperate friends : “ but above all, let them fly from the advice of “ their open, avowed, and determined enemies, “ who were now endeavouring, in order to pro“ mote their own private and party purposes, to “ force them on to a conduct, which could have " no end but in their ruin."

In a subsequent part of his speech, Mr. Brougham pointed out the inconsistency of the

very same individuals, who had held agitating “ the Catholick Question a fortnight back the “ very worst thing in the world, being then only “ anxious without a moment's delay to bring it

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« forward.” He then called the Governinent, “ if ever Government deserved the name, ef“ fective, generally consistent, able, honest, and

enlightened; denied the eagerness of the

Whigs for place," and described the scruples which they raised before they consented to join the Government “ as squeamish and uncalled sv for.” He then shewed how he had long approved of Mr. Canning's principles of foreign policy; and concluded by declaring his determination to give the Government a cordial, zealous, and disinterested support.

Mr. Canning then rose for the purpose, and he said not without the hope, of being able to persuade the House to place General Gascoyne in that priority to which by the invariable practice of the House he was entitled. He said that “ he must take leave to suggest to the Honour“ able Member, that proceedings so irregular “ brought with them generally their own cure, “ from the disgust which they never failed to “ excite. The trick was too bare; priority was “ due to General Gascoyne, although the in

terpolated topics were perhaps more interesting; but (he must remind the House) there “were large interests at stake, upon the decision “ of the subject, fixed for discussion that evening, “ which ought not to be lightly risked, and “ which would not fairly admit of postpone- ment."

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