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meets in New York on March 1 and 2, and I wish to make a proposition to meet the International presidents with a properly constituted committee from the printers' league acting under instructions from the body to discuss with the board the application and license for the use of the union label.

"It is a recognized fact that since the issuance of this application and license the use of the label has declined in popularity, and, as corroboration of my statement, I refer you to the list published in the Social Side for February, wherein you will sce some sixty-five former users who have declined to reapply on certain grounds.

"The volume of objections to the legality of this application that have been received by this office, and which were discussed at a board meeting last night, resulted in my instructions to address you and ask you to state time, place and date to confer with the league committee to consider and advise on a proposition which it is generally expected would be of interest to both sides, and would result in a more dignified and more general use of the label and would relieve the local council of the stigma now placed upon it by the majority of employers as being practically, and to all purpose, a combination in restraint of trade.

"It will afford me much pleasure to receive your acceptance of the league's proposition prior to the 26th of this month, at which time the league meets to consider this and other matters of general interest to the trade. "With best wishes, I am,

"Fraternally yours,

“(Signed) D. W. GREGORY,

Corresponding Secretary." A reply is received from Mr. Lynch, under date of February 23, stating that that communication should have gone to you. I regret that I shall not be able to have a reply from you before the date set for the league meeting, February 26, but I shall hope to have one in the near future.

If it is at all possible, let me have word from you by telephone tomorrow, so that I may communicate it to the mecting and then a letter from you at your convenience.

Fraternally yours,
(Signed) D. W. GREGORY,

Corresponding Secretary. A delegation consisting of William F. Moran, president, and L. P. Straube, secretary of the Chicago Allied Printing Trades Council, was granted the privilege of the floor and addressed the Joint Board on label matters in Chicago, particularly with reference to a case of the illegal use of the label in that jurisdiction that had been taken into the courts and decided adversely to the organization. The Chicago representatives recommended to the board that provision be made for a joint ownership of the label on the grounds that it could be better protected in this manner than under the present arrangement. President Lynch, of the International Typographical Union, spoke at length upon this subject, and its further considera. tion was made a special order of business for 10 A. M. on March 2.

Representatives Rosenson and Brady, of the Greater New York Allied Printing Trades Council, were granted the privilege of the floor, and invited the members of the Joint Conference Board to become the guests of the Greater New York Allied Printing Trades Council at 5:30 P. M. on March 1. On motion the invitation was accepted.

Mr. Woll moved that Third Vice-President Brady, of the Photo-Engravers', and Third VicePresident Smith, of the International Typographical Union, be granted the courtesies of the board

and seats in the meetings. The motion was car. ried.

President Glockling then presented the following communication from Attorney Cohen, referring to the law on trade marks:

DECEMBER II, 1908. Mr. Robert Glockling, President Joint Conference

Board, Allied Printing Trades, New York, N. Y.:

DEAR MR. GLOCKLING-Pursuant to our conver. sation recently had in this city, I beg leave to submit to your board the following:

The law of trade marks, as it existed some years ago, needed expensive and elaborate injunction suits to enforce the rights of the owner of the trade mark. Only the civil remedies of restraint and money damages were awarded, and the trouble and expense of the litigation being borne by the parties, principally the plaintiff.

The modern statutes, passed within the last ten or fifteen years, protect the labels of trade unions, and most of the states make the infringement of that label a criminal offense, as well as giving damages and an injunction.

As soon as the property right was recognized, in other words, with a right valuable enough to steal, thieves sprang up to steal it.

The Journeymen Tailors' Union of America in 1902 prosecuted a number of infringements, employing special counsel to try the cases.

The expense would sometimes run over $100 for a single

I was appointed at the time, and it devolved upon me to devise a way that all infringements could be prosecuted at a minimum of expense.

I had learned, in trying these cases in Denver, that the bulk of the work was in gathering the evidence, the getting the witnesses into court and having them ready when wanted; the rest was the duty of the prosecuting attorney.

We then adopted following method: As soon as an infringement came to the notice of a local branch the secretary, wrote me the facts; if they were incom: plete, I wrote him to investigate them further, and would tell him what was essential. If a clear case did not exist, I advised him to drop it; if a good case developed, I told him how to go ahead, giving him full instructions, and telling him where the law of his state could be found, and the de. cisions of his supreme court, if any there were, and he was further instructed to put these, with all the facts, before the prosecuting attorney of his county. As a result, we have convicted nineteen out of every twenty cases brought, most of them, seeing that we were prepared, pleading guilty instead of standing trial.

This prompt following us of infringements has stopped them in some communities, and the cost for the legal work has run from $7 to $15 a case.

Where the locals have to prosecute, it nearly always costs them more than this, and, in not knowing how to go about it, many infringements are abandoned. Under our system, the local, through its secretary or business agent, gets the witness and gathers the evidence and the International Union furnishes the legal advice, so that each does a share of the work, and our success has fully demonstrated the wisdom of doing this work systematically. Respectfully submitted,

HENRY Cohen.

Action upon this communication was deferred until after the consideration of other matters fore the joint board.

Two communications were read from the secre. tary of the Cincinnati Allied Printing Trades Council, setting forth that the council in that city had been in very bad shape, and that most of the organizations of which it was composed were in arrears for dues and assessments. During the dis. cussion upon these communications the information was brought about that most, if not all, of the organizations that had been in arrears at the

time these communications were sent in had since paid up and were now in good standing, and it was urged by Mr. Berry that the presidents of the various international organizations take up with the officers of subordinate unions the necessity of keeping in good standing in the allied trades council. Mr. Lynch, of the International Typographical Union, suggested that a letter signed by the officers of the Joint Conference Board be sent to the officers of the Cincinnati Allied Printing Trades Council, with a request that copies of the same be sent to the officers of the various subordi. nate unions connected therewith. Mr. Freel, of the International Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union, moved that a committee be appointed to draft a letter along the lines suggested by Mr. Lynch. This motion was carried, and Messrs. Lynch and Berry were appointed on this committee.

The following communication was received from Herman Jurgensen, of Hoboken, N. J.:

HOBOKEN, N. J., February 23, 1909. Mr. John W. Hays, Secretary-Treasurer Interna.

tional Typographical Union:

DEAR SIR-The above union hereby makes aplication to you for a charter for a local allied printing trades council.

We have held a joint meeting with No. 94 and No. 323, and it is the sense of the committee of each organization that it will be to the best interest of all parties concerned to form an allied printing trades council in Hudson county.

Trusting that you will give this matter your at. tention, I beg to remain,

Yours fraternally,
(Signed) HERMAN JURGENSEN,

Corresponding Secretary. 314 Park avenue.

The secretary-treasurer was instructed to send a copy of the joint agreement to Mr. Jurgensen, and call his attention to section 12 contained therein, which it was believed covered the matter on which inquiry was made, and at the same time inform him that the Joint Conference Board does not is. sue charters.

Thomas Henry, president, and Alfred Valentine, secretary-treasurer, of the New York Job Pressfeeders' No. 1, were granted the privilege of the floor, President Henry addressing the Joint Conference Board. During Mr. Henry's address a delegation from the New York Allied Printing Trades Council, consisting of President Carroll, Secretary Connelly, Treasurer Canary and H. Rosenson, were admitted. President Henry's remarks were principally upon a decision previously rendered through the secretary-treasurer of the Joint Conference Board. After he finished Mr. Berry, of the International Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, made an explanation as to the decision of the joint board as handed down by ex-Secretary-Treasurer Bramwood as to the standing of the Job Pressfeeders' Union No. 1, with especial reference to its scale, and moved that the same recognition be given Job Pressfeeders' Union No. I as is given other unions. This motion was seconded by Mr. Miller, of the International Typographical Union. President Carroll, of the New York Allied Printing Trades Council, addressed the meeting and requested that the joint

board take no action on Job Pressfeeders' Union No. I at this time, and explained to the board the workings of the New York Allied Printing Trades Council and the various conditions they had found it hard to overcome. Mr. Berry spoke at length in favor of his motion, and President Henry, of Job Pressfeeders' Union No. 1, again took the floor in defense of his organization. Mr. Freel, of the International Stereotypers' and Electrotypers Union, moved as a substitute that it be de. clared by the Joint Conference Board that there is nothing contained in the decision of the Joint Con. ference Board referring to the Job Pressfeeders' Union No. 1 that affects its standing under the joint agreement. Delegate Woll spoke at length upon the question.

Secretary Connelly, of the New York Allied Printing Trades Council, made a statement as to previous actions of Job Pressfeeders' Union No. 1 that had been the cause of many difficulties which the allied trades council had to meet.

Secretary Valentine, of the Job Pressfeeders' Union No. 1, also took the floor in defense of his organization.

Mr. Lynch, of the International Typographical Union, moved that the matters to be brought before the board by the New York Allied Printing Trades Council and the Printers' League of Amer. ica be made a special order of business for in o'clock, Tuesday, March 2, this to include an invi. tation to all parties who may be interested to be present during the discussion. Motion adopted. Then moved by Mr. Lynch that action on the motion offered by Mr. Freel in reference to the Job Pressfeeders' Union No. 1 be deferred until after the special order of business on Tuesday. Motion seconded by Mr. Woll. Mr. Berry, of the International Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, opposed the motion to postpone. Messrs. Lynch, Freel and Woll supported the motion, which was adopted.

Mr. Lynch, of the International Typographical Union, then offered the following resolution, which was unanimously adopted, with instructions to the secretary that a copy be sent to the widow of Mr. Jackson, a copy to the officers of New York Typographical Union No. 6, and to the officers of the New York Allied Printing Trades Council:

"RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED BY THE JOINT CONFERENCE BOARD OF THE ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUN

CIL OF NORTH AMERICA.

We have learned with deep regret of the untimely death of George W. Jackson, formerly president of the New York Allied Printing Trades Council and organizer for Typographical Union No. 6.

“Mr. Jackson was always an earnest worker for the best interests of all of the workers in the printing industry, and as a result of his efforts the conditions of these workers were materially improved. Of a lovable and genial disposition, always striving for a better and higher life and more comforts and happiness for the working class, Mr. Jackson endeared himself to all with whom lie came in contact.

"Resolved, that the Joint Conference Board, composed of representatives of the International Typographical Union, the International Pressmen and Assistants' Union, the International Brother. hood of Bookbinders, the International Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union and the International Photo-Engravers' Union, expresses its sor. row in the death of George W. Jackson, and conveys its condolences to his bereaved widow.

“(Signed) R. GLOCKLING, (Signed) J. W. Hays,

President. "Secretary-Treasurer."

ber meeting, ordered the proposition of striking the Twentieth Century Company submitted to a referendum vote. The stereotypers, not being involved, refrained from voting on the proposition. Pressmen's Union No. 40 and Press Assistants' Union No. 14 voted affirmatively. The other unions of the council have not, thus far, returned their vote on the proposition. The typographical union took no vote, but requested the council to defer action until the matter could be referred to the Joint Conference Board, as that body might offer.

The council acceded to the request of No. 49, and the matter is now respectfully laid before your honorable body for such action as may be deemed advisable.

Respectfully submitted,

WILLIAM TANNER,
E. A. BRAITHWAITE,
JOSEPHINE PERRY,
Thomas P. RODGERS,

AUG. C. STEFFENS,
Committee for the Council.

Mr. Lynch moved that the secretary-treasurer of the Joint Conference Board make arrangements for a time when the joint board could call on President Ridder, of the American Newspaper Pub. lishers' Association, for the purpose of paying its respects to that association through its president. The motion was adopted.

The meeting then adjourned to 3 P. M.

MONDAY AFTERNOON.

The Joint Conference Board reconvened at 3 P. M. with the same members present as were in attendance at the morning session.

The following communication from the Denver Allied Printing Trades Council was received and given consideration:

FEBRUARY 5, 1909. To the National Joint Conference Board:

Denver Allied Printing Trades Council respect. fully refers to your honorable body the following case;

The Twentieth Century Printing Company, prior to some fourteen months ago, was what is consid. ered a thorough union office, employing members of the various unions composing this council, includ. ing a member of Pressmen's Union No. 40. About that time a young man, Orville Tudor by name, appeared on the scene and claimed to have purchased an interest in the Twentieth Century concern and assumed the duties formerly performed by the aforesaid member of Pressmen's Union No. 40. He made application to Platen Pressmen's Union No. 1 for membership and was rejected. Later he made application to No. 40 and was again rejected. The label was withdrawn from the office at that time, and since its withdrawal the concern has employed members of the typographical, bindery women's and press assistants' unions continuously, but no member of No. 40, the young man before spoken of performing the task that would fall to a member of No. 40 were he employed therein. No. 40 appealed to the council for redress, standing upon her right to reject the Tudor application and claiming it to be obligatory on the other unions represented in the office to withdraw their members therefrom or to force the employment of a No. 40 man for such duties as come under the jurisdiction of that organization, contending that conditions prevailing in the office were contrary to the laws of the allied printing trades council. Typo. graphical Union No. 49 resisted the effort to withdraw its members from this office on the ground that Pressmen's Union No. 40 had acted arbitrarily in rejecting the Tudor application, accepting the claim that the aforementioned individual was possessed of the rights of ownership in the Twentieth Century concern and entitled to employment therein; that, being a young man against whose record nothing derogatory had been shown, and citing the further fact that as he was performing the duties aforementioned satisfactorily to the office where employed, he should have been accepted by either No. 1 or No. 40, and the danger of introducing a non-union concern in Denver averted.

The allied printing trades council, at its Decem

On motion the secretary of the Joint Conference Board was instructed to inform the Denver Allied Printing Trades Council that the board has no jurisdiction in this case. If the man referred to-Orville Tudor-feels dissatisfied with the action of either No. I or No. 40 he has the right to appeal to the president of the International Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union. Motion adopted.

An amendment which was offered to section 23 of the joint agreement at the November, 1908, meeting was then called up by Mr. Berry, of the International Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, who had presented it. During the discussion of the amendment to section 23, President J. T. Carey, of the International Brotherhood of Papermakers, asked to be admitted to the meeting, and, under the following agreement entered into at the December, 1907, meeting of the Joint Conference Board, it was decided that President Carey was at all times entitled to be present during the sessions of the board:

It is agreed between the International Brother. hood of Papermakers, party of the first part, and the International Typographical Union, the Inter. national Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, the International Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union, the International Brotherhood of Bookbinders and the International Photo-Engravers' Union, constituting the Joint Conference Board, party of the second part, that in consideration of effort on the part of the party of the second part in behalf of the union label of the International Brotherhood of Papermakers, this effort to be ex. erted in the way of moral influence, that the party of the first part will make no demand on the party of the second part that will involve the party of the second part in a contest with the employers because of the non-use of the product of the members of the party of the first part.

For the purpose of giving the greatest effect to the foregoing agreement in the interest of the party of the first part, the International Brotherhood of Papermakers is accorded the privilege of sending a representative to the meeting of the Joint Conference Board of the party of the second part, as outlined in the agreement between the units of the party of the second part. This

representative is to have a voice on all matters that affect the interests of the International Brotherhood of Papermakers, but no vote.

“The foregoing agreement is to continue until amended, abrogated, or changed by mutual con. sent."

Mr. Carey addressed the meeting, setting forth the conditions existing in his organization and named a number of companies that were turning out strictly non-union products.

After Mr. Carey concluded his remarks the joint board again took up the discussion of Mr. Berry's amendment to section 23, and the question was discussed at some length by Messrs. Berry, Lynch, Freel and Woll. After this discussion Mr. Freel, of the International Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union, moved as a substitute for Mr. Berry's amendment that we strike out all of section 23 after the word "board" in the seventh line. This substitute was adopted.

The following resolutions, which were adopted by San Francisco Allied Printing Trades Council, and referred to the Joint Conference Board, were then taken up and the secretary-treasurer was instructed to notify the San Francisco organization that the action of the board in amending section 23 disposed of the question contained in the resolutions:

SAN FRANCISCO, February 3, 1909. J. W. Bramwood, Secretary Joint Conference

Board, Indianapolis, Ind.:

DEAR SIR-By direction of San Francisco Allied Printing Trades Council, I transmit herewith copy of a resolution recently passed by that body:

"Resolved, That San Francisco Allied Printing Trades Council urge upon the representatives to the Joint Conference Board the adoption at its next meeting of the proposed amendment to scction 23, or such other amendment as in the judgment of the board will modify the unjust competition now prevailing in the commercial printing industry through the agency of the one man label shop."

Respectfully, submitted, with the request that the same be laid before the board.

Fraternally yours,

(Signed) GEORGE A. TRACY, President San Francisco Allied Printing Trades

Council.

Communications were then received from the Greater New York Allied Printing Trades Council as follows:

New York, March 1, 1909. To the Joint Conference Board of the Allied Print

ing Trades Council: GENTLEMEN—The Allied Printing Trades Council of Greater New York requests that you take under consideration the following matters, which are creating much confusion in the councií, hindering our progress and endangering the welfare of the coun. cil by reason of possible serious dissensions: We appreciate that the Joint Conference Board may not have the power to make actual decisions in every case, but we would ask that the interna. tionals interested be requested to tender a de. cision to the Joint Conference Board, and that such decisions be given to this local council from

First. A decision was given May 1, 1908, by the Joint Conference Board to the Allied Printing Trades Council of Greater New York to the effect that the local Job Pressfeeders' Union No. 1 had no control over the issuance and withdrawal of union labels in New York city other than the local council voluntarily was disposed to grant. The job pressfeeders' delegates claim that this decision is wrong, quoting their international president as

their authority. You will oblige the local council if you will render a further verbal or written opin. ion on this decision.

Second. The matter of jurisdictional contention over wrapping single papers by the bindery women workers and mailers is very detrimental to the progress of the council, and we request that the Joint Conference Board ask the International Brotherhood of Bookbinders and International Typographical Union representatives to reach a decision as quickly as possible.

Respectfully submitted,

Tuomas J. CARROLL, President,

MORTON B. CONNELLY, Secretary, Allied Printing Trades Council of Greater New York.

New YORK, March 1, 1909. To the

Joint Conference Board of the Allied Print. ing Trades Council of North America: GENTLEMEN—The Allied Printing Trades Council of Greater New York requests that the Joint Con. ference Board take into consideration means and methods to induce greater co-operation by subordinate unions and councils in the union label campaign, and the possibility of joint action by the printing trade unions, a matter in which they are mutually concerned, to wit: Publishing of school textbooks and purchase of same by, public school boards; uniform label agreements and methods in granting the right to use the union label; combined efforts in attaching large unfair printing plants whose products, such as magazines, cata. logues, calendars, papers, etc., are widely distributed; contract and systematic label work in fra. ternal societies; prosecution of fraudulent and imi. tation union label violators and safeguards designed for their protection.

We believe that every subordinate union should be compelled to associate itself in every local coun. cil, and that the local council should affiliate with central bodies of their vicinity, and would request that each international should so instruct its local people.

We believe that some central bureau of exchange should be established to collect and diffuse the experience gained by active label workers, leaving it to the discretion of the Joint Conference Board as to what shape this may take, but offering as a suggestion that every council which can afford it should attend a National Allied Printing Trades Council convention for this purpose.

Respectfully submitted,
(Signed) THOMAS J. CARROLL, President,

Morton B. CONNELLY, Secretary, Allied Printing Trades Council of Greater New

York.

On motion it was decided that action on these communications should be deferred until after consideration of the special order of business on Tuesday.

Moved by Mr. Freel, and seconded by Mr. Berry, that the joint agreement as amended be printed after the adjournment of this meeting. Motion adopted.

President Glockling appointed Messrs. Freel, Woll and Berry as the auditing committee to audit the accounts of ex-Secretary-Treasurer Bramwood,

Mr. Woll, of the International Photo-Engravers' Union, then nominated J. W. Hays for secretary. treasurer of the Joint Conference Board, and, there being no opposition, Mr. Hays was declared elected.

The question of the purchase of steel labels was brought up and discussed at some length. Secretary Connelly, of the New York Allied Printing Trades Council, gave his opinions at some length as to the durability and desirability of the steel labels, after which he was requested to have the manufacturer of these steel labels appear before

your board.

.

the Joint Conference Board at some time during this session. On motion the board then adjourned to 10 A, M., March 2.

TUESDAY, MARCH 2. The Joint Conference Board reassembled pursu. ant to adjournment, at 10 A. M. on the above date, with President Glockling in the chair, and the following answering roll call:

International Printing Pressmen and Assistants Union-George L. Berry, of Cincinnati, Ohio.

International Stereotypers' and Electrotypers' Union-James J. Freel, of New York, N. Y.

International Brotherhood of Bookbinders—Robert Glockling, of New York, N. Y.

International Photo-Engravers' Union-Matthew Woll, of Chicago, Ill.

International Typographical Union-James M. Lynch, Hugo Miller and J. W. Hays, of Indianapolis, Ind.

International Papermakers' Union-J. T. Carey, of Watertown, N. Y.

Representatives Moran and Straube, of the Chi. cago Allied Printing Trades Council, appeared before the Joint Conference Board on its opening and made further statements setting forth the con. ditions of the organization they represented. Mr. Woll, of the International Photo-Engravers' Union, supported the Chicago proposition, and moved that an additional section be added to the joint agreement providing for the adoption of a Joint Conference Board label and the amendments of sec. tions 19,

20 and 21, to conform thereto. Mr. Lynch, of the International Typographical Union, opposed the Chicago proposition and the amendment of Mr. Woll. Mr. Berry, of the pressmen, supported the Woll amendment, but advocated a thorough investigation before any steps along these lines were taken.

Mr. Lynch stated he would make no objections to an investigation, as suggested by Mr. Berry, provided Delegate Woll would withdraw his amendments.

Discussion on this question was interrupted by the arrival of the time for the special order set for ui o'clock to hear from the representatives of the Printers' League and the New York Allied Printing Trades Council.

President Francis, of the Printers' League of America, made a statement for the league, informing the Joint Conference Board that the league had inaugurated a new regime in that it stood ready and desired to co-operate with the printing trades organizations. He then took up at some length the question of the union label, stating that the members of the Printers' League be. lieved that the license as now granted by the allied printing trades council for the use of the label was not such as could be signed by the members of the league. That the members of the league believed in the union label and desired an agreement whereby membership in the league would be a sufficient guarantee to secure the use of the label. He stated further that the members of the New York Allied Printing Trades Council did not appear to realize the difference in the pol

icy the Printers' League of America is trying to pursue and that which had been pursued by previ. ous organizations of employers. The league members guarantee at all times to employ only union men, so far as this is possible, and one of the requirements for membership in the league is will. ingness to run a union office and hold confer. ences for the purpose

of settling differences through conciliation, the members of the league believing that the rules at present being enforced by the New York Allied Printing Trades Council were burdensome. He believed that a certificate signed by the president of the league should be all that was necessary to guarantee the proper use of the label, and that in case of any violation of the label agreement the matter be taken up and disposed of between the Printers' League and the Joint Conference Board. He also believed that one of the greatest stumbling blocks to bringing about an agreement such as desired was the going into business of union men who do not live up to the rules of their own organization. He believed that the contract which the allied printing trades council now demanded should be signed reduced the number of people who were willing to use the label, and he presented for the consideration of the Joint Conference Board the following form of contract which he believed to be a good basis on which to negotiate for the adoption of an agree. ment suitable for the purposes of the league and the New York Allied Printing Trades Council:

Suggestions. It is suggested that any member of the Printers' League, properly vouched for by the president of that body as being in good standing and keeping the constitution of the league, should, if he desires it, be entitled to the use of the label. He should present an application on the following order: New York,

1909.

a member of the Printers' League of America (New York Branch No. 1), hereby applies for the use of the label of the Allied Printing Trades Council of Greater New York, under the provisions of the agreement entered into between the aforesaid organizations. (Signed)

President. Attest

Contract. This agreement, made this

day of 190.., between the Printers' League of America (New York Branch No. 1), party of the first part, and the Allied Printing Trades Council of Greater New York, party of the second part, witnesseth:

Whereas, The members of the party of the first part, employers of organized labor, are desirous of securing the use of the label issued by the party of the second part; and,

Whereas, The party, of the second part, recog. nizing the principles of the party of the first part, by its fraternal support of organized labor, witnessed by its employment of members of organized labor, are willing to permit the use of its label by the members of the party of the first part; it is

Agreed, That the members of the said Printers' League of America (New York Branch No. 1) may, upon the following conditions, be entitled to, and the party of the second part hereby licenses them to use said label so long as they remain members of the said party of the first part:

1. The applicant's application is to bear the en: dorsement of the president of the party of the first part and the attest of its properly constituted official.

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