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RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES AND BENEFITS PAID TO LOCAL UNIONS-JUNE 1, 1908, TO MAY 31, 1909

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German-American

1, Philadelphia, Pa.
2. Cincinnati, Ohio,
3, St. Louis, Mo..
4, Buffalo, N. Y.
5, Rochester, NY
6, Cleveland, Ohio..
7. New York, N. Y.
8, Newark, N. J..
9, Chicago, III.
10. Milwaukee, Wis.
11, Baltimore, Md..
12, Louisville, Ky.
13, St. Paul-Min'polis, Minn,
14, Indianapolis, Ind.
15, Evansville, Ind.
16, Pittsburg, Pa.
18, Belleville, Ill.
19, Columbus, Ohio,
20, Davenport, Iowa.
21, Detroit, Mich
23, Winnipeg, Man.
25, Wheeling, W. Va..

Total...

$220 10
184 75
333 09
126 82

34 99
141 1+
1,433 86

136 92
431 34
278 46
108 01
46 74
76 80
50 73
45 34
97 11
41 20
42 28
43 37
72 15
53 57
24 00

$94 80

82 35
121 25
59 25
14 10
59 25
473 45

47 85
161 40
122 10
53 55
19 50
35 25
21 60
21 60
42 30
21 55
16 05
17 70
43 65
19 50
12 60

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77 98 1,454 59

80 00
116 28
70 40
52 50
49 00
72 73
30 10

60 15
719 25
55 05
43 05
24 75
33 95
26 25
34 35
14 25

75
51 55
103 85
131 25
31 55

77 19 222 28 375 70 49 41

* The supplies, sundries, etc., column includes receipts from cash returned, from the sale of supplies, returned transportation of Home inmates, donations to the Home library fund, and arrearages collected on the eight-hour assessment. RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES AND BENEFITS PAID TO LOCAL UNIONS-JUNE 1, 1908, TO MAY 31, 1909

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Recapitulation,
Typographical

$205,520 60 $18,546 31 $26,423 38 $193,112 90 $443,603 19 $169,231 07 $193,112 90 $81,259 22 $36,525 00 $116,268 67 $65,664 00 $218,457 67
German-American

4,128 40

13 25 1 00 4,022 76 8,165 41 2,582 00 4,022 76 1,560 65 975 00

165 00 1,916 00 3,056 00 Mailers..

5,333 75 124 32
666 75 4,168 21 10,293 03 4,089 82 4,168 21 2,035 00

675 00
35 00

710 00
Newspaper Writers.

291 00

4 00
36 45 220 82 552 27 222 70 220 82

108 75
Miscellaneous

11,312 25 3,432 15 1,415 65 16,160 05 13,189 71 1,415 65 1,554 69
Total...

$215,273 75 $30,000 13 | $30,559 73 $202,940 34 $478,773 95 $189,315 30 $202,940 34 $86,518 31 $38,175 00 $116,468 67 $67,580 00 $222,223 67 * The supplies, sundries, etc., column includes receipts from cash returned, from the sale of supplies, returned transportation of Home inmates, donations to the Home library fund, arrearages collected on the eight-hour assessment, interest and other sundry receipts. The receipts here given include individual subscriptions, $78.29; advertising, $3,353.86. THE OLD AGE PENSION FUND.

In this report it is unnecessary to reproduce the history of the old age pension fund.

The press has given so much publicity to this great feature of our beneficent policy that the manner of its inauguration is as well known to non-members as to members of the International Typographical Union. No trade union undertaking in America has been so widely discussed or carefully watched by students of economical and sociological subjects. All marvel at the successful inauguration of the plan and at the ease with which it became a part of our business. The old age pension law is a monument to the wisdom of the convention that framed it and to the membership which placed thereon the stamp of its approval by an overwhelming majority.

The fund is young. Our experience with it is limited, in the collection of the assessment, to fourteen months—two months in the last fiscal year and twelve in the present year, closing May 31, 1909. It was estimated by the committee preparing the law that an assessment of one-half of I per cent on the total earnings of all members would produce $168,000 per year, and it was thought that the annual payments to pensioners would aggregate $104,000. This estimate was deemed conservative and was based upon the best data then obtainable. Actual experience with the fund has proven surprising. Its receipts have been far in excess of the estimate and the expenditures therefrom considerably less than was anticipated, with this result:

RECEIPTS. June 1, 1908-Balance in fund.

$26,377 18 May 31, 1909-One-half of i per cent assessment

201.468 69 May 31, 1909--Interest

1,415 65 May 31, 1909–Pensions returned.

56 00

738, or practically $897 per member. No other American trade union can show an equal average earning capacity. We have been exceedingly for. tunate in enjoying a prosperous year. While other trades have had as many as two-thirds of their members unemployed, the printing business in union offices has been uniformly good, and to the steady employment of the great majority of the membership is due the large sum received upon the pension assessment.

The pension is paid once in every four weeks, the plan being to give each pensioner thirteen checks in twelve months. It will be remembered payments upon the pension began with the month of August, 1908. At the close of business on May 31, 1909, ten payments had been made, cov. ering the forty weeks ending May 10, 1909. The amount paid to pensioners, as was shown in the foregoing table, was $67,580, an average of $1,689.50 per week. Had this ratio been maintained for fifty-two weeks-one year--the demands upon the fund would still have been far less than its revenue. The possibility of constantly increas. ing expenditures, because of the continual addition of names to the pension roll, is discussed by the executive council in its report.

Applications for the pension to the number of 647 had been received up to May 31, 1909. Of this number 48 petitions were disapproved, I was withdrawn, 580 were approved and action upon 18 was pending. Death invaded the ranks of the pensioners on 38 occasions, leaving 542 pensioners on the roll on the date above named.

The following table contains a list of unions having members upon the pension list, the number of members on the pension roll from each local, the amount paid to them to May 31, 1909, and the total membership of each union:

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12 45 14 14

5 148

5 7 2 5

EXPENDITURES. Paid to pensioners.

.$67,580 00 Clerical work.

1,501 25 Books and printing..

455 35 Expressage

13 75 Total

69,550 35 Balance in fund May 31, 1909....... $ 159,767 17

The foregoing statement shows a comparatively small amount of interest to have been received upon the pension fund. To obtain the highest rate of interest the surplus in the fund was divided into time deposits. On such deposits interest is paid but once in six months. For this reason the interest actually received on the fund during the fiscal year appears small, but the accumulated interest which will be received in the next fiscal year will show the surplus fund to be earning 3 per cent compounded semi-annually.

In the twelve months covered by the above table the average paying membership of the International Typographical Union was 44,921. Thus the monthly receipts from the pension assessment have averaged $16,789.05; 37.3 cents per member per month, or $4.48 per member per year.

These fig. ures mean that the total earnings of the average membership during the year aggregated, $40,293,

1, Indianapolis, Ind... 2, Philadelphia, Pa. 3, Cincinnati, Ohio. 4, Albany, N. Y 5, Columbus, Ohio 6, New York, N. Y. 7, Pittsburg, Pa 8, St. Louis, Mo.. 9, Buffalo, N. Y 10, Louisville, Ky. 12, Baltimore, Md.. 13, Boston, Mass 15, Rochester, N. Y. 16. Chicago, MI.. 17, New Orleans, La. 18. Detroit, Mich 20, Nashville, Tenn.. 21, San Francisco, Cal. 22, Dubuque, Iowa. 23, Milwaukee, Wis. 27, Mobile, Ala. 28. Galveston, Texas 30, St. Paul, Minn. 33, Providence, R. I. 34, Columbia, S. C. 35, Evansville, Ind 39. Grand Rapids, Mich.. 42, Minneapolis, Minn.. 43, Charleston, S. C. 45, Leavenworth, Kan. 46. Sacramento, Cal. 47, New Haven, Conn.. 48, Atlanta, Ga

424 901 515 424

269 6,553

576 1,107

342 244 471 1,312

194 3,304

340 422 217 884

52 390 53 66 330 173 45 62 106 433 26 35 162 116 222

19

7 29 7 4 3 19 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1

$1.696 00 5,984 (0) 1,988 00 1,500 00

464 00 18,636 00

768 00 772 00 100 00 488 00 732 00 1,664 00

960 00 3,932 00

896 00 604 00

384 00 2,160 00

44 00 160 00 132 00 156 00 340 00 160 00 160 00 160 00 208 00 240 00 64 00 100 00 624 160 00 160 00

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Number and Name of Union

501 134 514

It will be noted that the membership of these unions is over two-thirds of the total membership of the International Typographical Union; that the 542 pensioners comprise 1.7 per cent of the membership of the unions with which they are af. filiated and 1.15 per cent of the total membership of the International Union.

A table showing the age of members at the time of making application for the pension, together with the number drawing the pension, disapproved, dead and pending, follows:

NUMBER AND AGE OF APPLICANTS.

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2015 115 290 55 42 142 201 43 41 111

78 101 88

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43A 72

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57 46

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51 34 34 29 35 35 31 21 34 39 29 28

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63 64 65 66 67 68 09 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 88 93

36 31 31 18 16 32 19 13 11

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$536 00

152 00 544 00 412 00 548 00 612 00

56 00 100 00 396 00 480 00

96 00 640 00 504 00 312 00 320) 00 160 00 228 00 124 00 40) 00 100 00

40 00 160 00 320 00 132 00 324 00 816 00

16 00 316 00) 112 00

16 00 320 00 2,164 00

112 00 644 00 460 00

72 00 304 00 224 00

64 00 160 000 120 00

60 00 480 00 276 00

64 00 160 00 72 (0) 100 00 161) 00 100 00 156 00 80 00 48 (0 316 00 164) 00)

88 00 612 00 161 00 232 00 128 00 112 00 160 00

48 00 208 00

96 00 204 00 156 00 164) 00 160 00

139

1

2 17 1 5 3 1 3 3 1 2 2 1 3 2 1 1

49, Denver, Colo... 52, Troy, N. Y. 53, Cleveland, Ohio.. 54, Raleigh, N. C.. 55, Syracuse, N, Y. 57, Dayton, Ohio... 58, Portland, Ore.. 59, Quincy, i11. 61. Cambridge, Mass. 62, Utica, N. Y 63, Toledo, Ohio. 64, Lafayette, Ind.. 67, Lockport, N. Y. 71, Trenton, N. J 72, Lansing, Mich. 76, Terre Haute, Ind. 78, Fort Wayne, Ind. 79, Wheeling, W. Va 80, Kansas City. Mo.. 82, Colorado Springs, Colo. 85, St. John, N. B., Canada. 86, Reading, Pa. 87. Housion, Texas.. 88, Hannibal, Mo.. 9), Richmond, Va.. 91, Toronto, Ont., Canada. 92, Little Rock, Ark. 93, Macon, Ga. 95, Helena, Mont, 97, Peru, Ind 100, Norwich, Conn... 101, Washington, D.C. 102, Ottawa, Ont., Canada 103, Newark, N. J 104, Birmingham, Ala 107, Rock Island. 111. (Tri-City). 111, Knoxville, Tenn. 112, Scranton, Pa. 113, Atchison, Kan. 117, Springfield, Ohio. 118, Des Moines, Iowa.. 122, Kalamazoo, Mich. 127, Hartford, Conn. 130, Halifax, N. S., Canada 132, Camden, N. J... 136, Duluth, Minn.. 138. Austin, Texas..... 139, Stratford, Ont., Canada 145, Montreal, Canada (French).. 146, Charleston, W. Va. 150, Eazabeth, NJ: 154, Ann Arbor, Mich. 158, Springfield, Mo... 167, Schenectady, N, Y 172, San Antonio, Texas.. 173, Dallas, Texas 174, Los Angeles, Cal. 176, Montreal, Can. (English). 177. Springfield, Ill.... 180, Sioux City, Iowa. 181, Meadville, Pa... 183, Savannah, Ga.. 185, Bradford, Pa. 19), Omaha, Neb. 192, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 1%, Logansport, Ind. 199, Zanesville, Ohio. 200), Youngstown, Ohio. 203, Council Bluffs, Iowa 217, Murphysboro, Ill. 301, Richmond, Ind. 424, Orange, N. J.. 461, Cairo, Ill. 468, Yonkers, N. Y 641, Ennis, Texas. German-American

1, Philadelphia, Pa.
2, Cincinnati, Ohio.
3, St. Louis, Mo.
6, Cleveland. Ohio.
7, New York, N. Y
9, Chicago, 111.
10. Milwaukee, Wis..
18, Belleville, 111.

Total. ...

40 172

19 105 171

50 116 64

2

13 13 27 14 12 10 6 7 6 1 1 2 1

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97

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*Includes one withdrawn.

An analysis of the ages of the pension appli. cants develops the notable fact that the average age of the 647 applicants is 69.6 years. Of the total number, 62.5 per cent (405) are between 60 and 70 years; 33 per cent (214) are septuagenarians; 4.1 per cent (27) are octogenarians; while one is a nonagenarian. There are now two women on the pension roll---Miss E. Louise Bryant, of New Haven (Conn.) Union No. 47, and Mrs. Elizabeth V. Foran, of San Francisco (Cal.) Union No. 21.

DISAPPROVED APPLICATIONS. In the considering of applications for the pension the executive council experiencedl difficulty in getting satisfactory data concerning the continuous membership of some applicants on account of incomplete local records and the absence of a record of all members at headquarters. It was surprised to find among the petitioners a number who had not been active members of the organization for several years.

These applicants had been on the honorary rolls of local unions, yet claimed continuous membership, and were aggrieved when their petitions were denied. In two or three cases the applicant was not, at the time of filing his pe

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EXPENDITURES-JUNE 1, 1908, TO MAY

31, 1909. Printing and mailing twelve issues. . $12,769 65 Paper

12,502 43 Postage

3,218 88 Addressing machine supplies.

414 27 Wrapping paper

502 27 Clerical work.

2,926 95 Halftones

114 44

tition, an active member of a local union, but based his claim for the pension upon the fact that he had held active membership for twenty continuous years before taking a withdrawal card or going on the honorary roll of a local union. Others had been suspended or expelled, and reinstated, without the payment of accumulated dues. Some had been in and out of the organization on honorable withdrawal cards. As consti ued by the executive council and the Boston convention of the International Union, an applicant must have been a continuous active member in good standing for twenty years immediately preceding the date on which his petition for the pension is filed to ren. der him eligible thereto. Persons on the honorary, exempt, or retired lists of local unions, or holding honorable withdrawal cards, are in no sense beneficiary members of the International Typographical Union. Membership in the parent organization can only be maintained by the regular payment of dues and assessments in monthly sequence, either by the individual or for him by his union. In the light of this fact, the applicants to whom the pension has been denied were not eligible to participate in the fund.

re.

Total

. $32,448 89 RECAPITULATION. Balance in fund June 1, 1918.

$545 45 Receipts to May 31, 1909....

30,559 73 Total

- $31,105 18 Expenditures

32,448 89 Excess of expenditures over ceipts

$1,343 71 In the foregoing calculation only the actual receipts and expenditures are given. Advertising accounts outstanding on May 31, 1909, amounting to $375.11, were not considered.

The receipts from advertising show a slight increase ($372.54) over the previous year, but the revenue from this source is by no means satisfac. tory, although the agency handling the advertising has exerted every possible effort to add to our patronage. Perhaps we are too conservative. Other trade papers are carrying the ads of concerns that are not union, and, in some cases, are on the unfair list. It has been our policy to refuse all copy from advertisers who might prove offensive to our readers because of their attitude towards labor. Magazines accepting such advertisements justify their position by the claim that the money of these advertisers is “as good to them as to any

Again, there are many good advertisers who have all trade papers upon their “unfair lists." Suffice it to say that nothing will be left undone that can add to the volume of acceptable advertising appearing in The JOURNAL.

The twelve issues of THE JOURNAL, printed and mailed in this year, comprised 1,616 pages and cover, a total of 1,664 pages including cover.

THE TYPOGRAPHICAL JOURNAL.

one."

The improvement of The JOURNAL, how to make it more interesting, instructive and useful to the organization, has been the subject of much thought. While our official paper has always been recognized as a leader in its class, there is no height in trade union journalism to which we, as an or. ganization, can not aspire. Of copy there has been no dearth. The problem has been to find space for it and keep the cost of THE JOURNAL within its rightful revenue. In an effort to do this, the editor's blue pencil has often worked overtime, much to the disappointment of many correspondents. Copy received has been edited with a view to eliminating from THE JOURNAL personalities and personal differences which should be settled among ourselves and not paraded before the public. Experience has taught us that the greatest good to the greatest number can only be attained by presenting a solid front to the common enemy. This has been the purpose and policy of THE JOURNAL and its editor, and it is a pleasure to state that all writers for the official paper are animated with a desire to build up rather than tear down or in any way hamper the progress of the organization. Though there have been differences of opinion between some of the correspondents and your secretary-treasurer, our relations in the main have been most pleasant.

In connection with this subject let us look for a moment at the cost of the publication of The JOURNAL, as shown in the following figures:

RECEIPTS-JUNE 1, 1908, TO MAY 31, 1909. Subscriptions from non-members.. Subscriptions from members.

26,436 55 Subscriptions from apprentices, etc.

202 03 Union cards

489 00 Advertising

BONDS OF LOCAL OFFICERS. Section 17, of the general laws of the International Union, requires every subordinate union to bond its fiduciary officers in an adequate sum in some reputable surety company. The law fur. ther provides that the officers of each local union shall report to the secretary-treasurer the amount for which the union's officers are bonded, the company issuing the bond and the renewals thereof from time to time. Numerous complaints have been made concerning this law by the smaller unions. The objecting locals hold that it is an injustice to require them to bond their secretaries when the amount in their treasuries is so small. In some instances secretaries have resigned rather than give bond, claiming that the law is a reflection upon their honesty. I am convinced, how. ever, that the law is an excellent one, and that its application should be further extended. At the present time the bond of each local secretary remains with the president, or executive committee, of the interested union. Occasions have arisen

$78 29

3,353 86

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