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Sic fate e'er lang shall thee betide,

Tho' thou may gayly bloom a while;
Yet sune thou shalt be thrown aside,
Like

ony common weed and vile. *

* The following are the old words of this song:

I do confess thou ’rt smooth and fair,

And I might have gone near to love thee;
Had I not found the slightest prayer

That lips could speak, had power to move thee:
But I can let thee now alone
As worthy to be lov'd by none.

I do confess thou’rt sweet, yet find

Thee such an unthrift of thy sweets,
Thy favours are but like the wind

That kisseth every thing it meets.
And since thou can’st with more than one,
Thou’rt worthy to be kiss’d by none.

The morning rose, that untouch'd stands,

Arm’d with her briars, how sweetly smells !
But pluckd and strain'd through ruder hands,

Her sweet no longer with her dwells;
But scent and beauty both are gone,
And leaves fall from her, one by one.

Such fate, ere long, will thee betide,

When thou hast handled been awhile!
Like sere flowers to be thrown aside,

And I shall sigh, while some will smile,
To see thy love to every one
Hath brought thee to be lov'd by none!

This

THE SOGER LADDIE.

The first verse of this is old; the rest is by Ramsay.The tune seems to be the same with a slow air, called Jacky Hume's Lament-or, The Hollin Buss-or, Ken ye what Meg o' the Mill has gotten?

WHERE WAD BONIE ANNIE LIE.

The old name of this tune is—

Whare'll our Gudeman lie.

A silly old stanza of it runs thus

O whare'll our gudeman lie,

Gudeman lie, gudeman lie,
O whare'll our gudeman lie,

Till he shute o'er the simmer?

This song may be seen in Playford's Select Ayres, 1659, folio, under the title of a Song to a forsaken Mistresse.

It is also printed in Ellis's Specimens of the early English Poets, vol. iii. p. 395.

Up amang-the hen-bawks,

The hen-bawks, the hen-bawks,
Up amang the hen-bawks,

Amang the rotten timmer.

GALLOWAY TAM.

I have seen an interlude acted at a wedding to this tune, called, The Wooing of the Maiden.These entertainments are now much worn out in this part of Scotland.---Two are still retained in Nithsdale, viz. Silly puir auld Glenae; and this one, The Wooing of the Maiden.

AS I CAM DOWN BY YON CASTLE WA'.

This is a very popular Ayrshire song.

As I cam down by yon castle wa',

And in by yon garden green,
O there I spied a bonnie bonnie lass,

But the flower-borders were us between.

A bonie bonie lassie she was,
As ever mine

eyes
did

see ;
O five hundred pounds would I give,

For to have such a pretty bride as thee.

To have such a pretty bride as me!

Young man ye are sairly mista'en; Tho' ye were king o' fair Scotland,

I wad disdain to be your queen.

Talk not so very high, bonnie lass,

O talk not so very, very high ; The man at the fair that wad sell,

He maun learn at the man that wad buy.

I trust to climb a far higher tree,

And herry a far richer nest:
Tak this advice o' me, bonnie lass,

Humility wad set thee best.

0, FOR ANE AND TWENTY, TAM.

Tune- The MOUDIEWORT.

This song is mine.

An' O, for ane and twenty, Tam!

An' hey, sweet ane and twenty, Tam!
I'll learn my kin a rattling sang,

An' I saw ane and twenty, Tam!

They snool me sair, and haud me down,

And gar me look like Blundie,* Tam!
But three short years will soon wheel roun',

And then comes ane and twenty, Tam!

An O, for ane and twenty, Tam!

An' hey, sweet ane and twenty, Tam! Pll learn

my

kin a rattlin sang,
An' I saw ane and twenty, Tam!

*“ This looks just like Jock Blunt himsel."

This is commonly said of a person who is out of countenance at a disappointment.-Jamieson.

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