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Note VIII.

A pigmy scraper on a fiddle,

Wha us’d to trystes and fairs to driddle.

To driddle. A contemptuous phrase applied to the walking or other motions of people who are deformed, or diminutive in stature.

Note IX.

At kirns an' weddings we'se be there,
An' 0! sae nicely's we will fare !
We'll bouze about, &c.

A Scotch wedding lasted three or four days in ancient times: Feasting, dancing, and other merriment, afforded rare doings for the strolling minstrels.

Note X.

And while I kittle hair on thairms.
i.e. while I rub a horse-hair bow upon cat-gut.

Note XI.

Wi' ghastly ee, poor Tweedle-dee
Upon his hunkers bended.

To sit on one's hunkers, to sit with the hips hanging downwards, and the weight of the body depends ing on the knees.

No. XII.

An' by that stowpe, my faith an' hope,

An' by that dear Keilbagie !
If e'er ye want, or meet wi' scant,

May I ne'er weet my craigie!

This is a deeply-solemn oath for a tinker ; but it must be remembered that his resources never failed while any of his neighbours' property remained unsecured. The faith to be put in their curses is pro-verbial.

That dear Keilbagie. Keilbagie is a well-known kind of whiskey, in great request among the jovial inhabitants of Posie NANSJE's barn.

Note XIII.

Her lord, a wight of Homer's craft,

Tho' limpin' wi' the spavie,
He hirpled up, and lap like daft,
An' shor'd them Dainty Davie'

O boot that night.

The strolling bard seems rejoiced at getting rid of one of his doxies ; and merrily shores, ar makes a blythe threatening promise of the tune called “Dainty Davie,' into the bargain.

Note XIV.

I am a bard, of no regard

Wi' gentle-folks, an' a' that ;
But Homer-like, the glowran-byke,

Frue town to town I draw that.

The glowran-byke. Byke is a term applied to a swarm of bees. Here it means a multitude of people, whom the bard draws from their houses, like so many bees, to listen to his lilting.

Note XV.

They toom’d their pocks, they pawn'd their duds. i.e. they emptied their wallets, and pawn'd their rags.

FINIS,

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PAGE
Beneath a green shade I fand a fair maid . 133
Bess the Gawkie.

2
Bide

ye,
bide
ye yet

161
Bide
ye yet

163
Billet, by Jean Gradden

172
Blink owre the burn, sweet Betty

66
Bothwel Banks (note)

76
Braw, braw lads of Galla-water

127
Bruce's Address to his Army (Burns, Note) 165
Cauld kail in Aberdeen.

142
Cauld kail in Aberdeen .

141
Cromlet's lilt

82
Down the burn Davie

65
Duncan Gray (Burns)

137
Fairest of the fair (Note)

37
Go to the ewe-bughts Marion .

S6
Guid yill comes, and guid yill goes

117
Hee, balow, my sweet wee Donald (Note).

63
I dream'd Ilay where flowers were springing( Burns) 130
I hae been at Crookie-den (Note)

34
I'm owre young to marry yet (Burns)

107
Johnie's grey breeks .

22
Lewie Gordon

89
Look up to Pentland's tow'ring tap

17
Macpherson's Farewell (Burns)

108
Maggie Lauder

94
Mary's dream.

51
May eve, or Kate of Aberdeen

27
Mili, millo

133

PAGE

60
84
110
91
90
166

6
74
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12

My ain kind dearie 0
My dearie if thou die
My Jo Janet
O corn rigs an' rye rigs .
Oh ono chrio
Raving winds around her blowing (Burns)
Roslin castle
Sae merry as we twa hae been
Saw

ye

Johnnie cummin, quo' she
Saw ye nae my Peggy
Sheriff Muir
Strathallan's lament (Burns)
Strephon and Lydia
Tarry woo
The banks of the Devon (Burns)
The battle of Sheriff-muir (Burns)
The birks of Aberfeldy (Burns)
The blaithrie o't
The blaithrie o't
The boatie rows
The bonie, brucket lassie
The bridal o't .
The bush aboon Traquair
The collier's bonnie lassie
The drucken wife oʻGalloway
The happy marriage (Note)
The highland lassie O (Burns)
The jolly beggar ·
The lass of Patie's mill
The lord o' Gordon had three dochters
The posie (Burns)
The ranting dog the daddie o't (Burns)
There's nae luck about the house.
The rock an' the wee pickle tow
The tears of Scotland
The turnimspike
The wauking of the faulds

145
122
106

57
132
158
112
38
40
45
72
167
77
60
185

47
115
53
30
86
49
184

68
174
124
32
92

.

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