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Thirty-third Day of Omer.
Year. No. Name.
Day. Fasts and Feasts.

Gregorian Date. 6670 9 Sivan

1
Rosh-Chodesh..

Wednesday, June 8 5670 9 Sivan

6
First Day of Pentecost.

.Monday, June 13 5670 10 Tammuz 1 Rosh-Chodesh.

Thursday-Friday, July 7-8 5670 10 Tammuz .17 Fast of Tammuz.

.. Sunday, July 24 11 Ab or Av. 1 Rosh-Chodesh.

.Saturday, August 6 11 Ab or Av. 9 Fast of Av.....

... Sunday, August 14 5670 12 Ellul 1 Rosh-Chodesh.

.Sunday-Monday, September 4-5 5671 1 Tishri

1 First Day of New Year. Thurs., Oct. 4, or sunset, Oct. 3 DE 12 5671 1 Tishri 3 Fast of Gedaliah..

Thursday, October 6 1 Tishri

10
Yom-Kippoor.

Thursday, October 13 1 Tishri

13
First Day ofTabernacles.

Tuesday, October 18 1 Tishri

21
Hoshannah-Rabbah.

Monday, October 24 1 Tishri

22
Sh'mini-Atseres.

Tuesday, October 25
1 Tishri
.23 Simchas Torah.

Wednesday, October 26 2 Chesvan

1

Rosh-Chodesh.... Wednesday-Thursday, November 2-3 3 Kislev 1 Rosh-Chodesh.

.Friday, December 2 3 Kislev

25
First Day of Chanukah.

.Monday, December 26 5671 4 Tebet

1 Rosh-Chodesh.. Saturday-Sunday, Dec. 31-Jan. 1, 1911

CHINESE CALENDAR, YEAR 4607. The year 1910 corresponds nearly with the Chinese year 4607, or the 47th year of the 76th cycle of 60 years, and contains 354 days: 1st Month begins Feb. 10.....lasts 29 days) 7th Month begins Aug. 6...... lasts 30 days 20 Month begins Mch. 11. ....lasts 30 days 8th Month begins Sept. 4.... lasts 29 days

3d Month begins Apr. 10. ....lasts 29 days 9th Month begins Oct. 3...... lasts 30 days e: 4th Month begins May 9.....lasts 29 days 10th Month begins Nov. ...lasts 30 days 25th Month begins June 7. ....lasts 30 days 11th Month begins Dec. 2......lasts 30 days Uit 6th Month begins July 7.....lasts 29 days 12th Month begins Jan. 1, 1911..lasts 29 days

MAHOMETAN CALENDAR, A. M, 8019.
The year 1328 is the 8th of the 45th cycle of 30 years and has 854 days.
Month.s

Lasts,
-Month.-

Lasts,
Years. No. Name.
Begins. days. Years. No. Name.

Begins. days. 1... Muharrem Jan. 13 30 | 1328...8... Shaban

.Aug. 8 29 1328.. 2...Saphar

Feb. 12
29 1328...

9... Ramadan *Sept. 6 30 1328.. 3...Rabia I. .Mch. 13 30 1328...10... Schawall Oct.

6 29 1328. 4... Rabia II.

.Apr. 12 29 1328...11...Dul Kaeda.. Nov. 4 30 1328 5...Jomhadi I. .May 11 30 1328...12... Dulheggia .Dec. 4 29 1328.

6...Jomhadi II......June 10 29 1329... 1... Muharrem...Jan. 2, 1911 1328... 7...Rajab

July 9 30

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*Fasting. tFeast of Bairam.
SEASONS; ALSO SUN'S APPARENT PATH THROUGH THE ZODIAC.

Eastern Standard Time.
Sun enteri,
Sign. Con. Date. H.M.

D. H.M.
Dec. 22,6 12 a.m., 1909. Winter begins and lasts 89 0 32 S. of Equator.
Jan. 21.
Feb. 20.
Mch, 21, 6 64 a.m., 1910. Spring begins and lasts 92 19 46 N. of Equator.
Apr, 21.
May 21.
June 22, 2 40 &.m., 1910. Summer begins and lasts 93 14 42 N. of Equator.
July 21.
Aug. 23.
Sept. 23, 6 22 p.m., 1910. Autumn begins and lasts 89 18 42 S. of Equator.
Oct. 23.
Nov. 23.
Dec. 22, 04 p.m., 1910. Wirter begins and

Tropical year365 642
H. M.

D. H. M.
89 0 32

92 19 46 89 18

93 14 42

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The sun will be 7 15 14 longer north of the Equator than south of it. This is due to the slower motion of the earth (apparent motion of the sun) when the earth is near its aphelion or furthest point in its orbit from the sun during the summer months.

THE PLANETS. Mercury will be brightest (1) as a morning star, west of the sun, rising about ih. 20m. before the sun, February 8-16 and October 6-14. He will be furthest west of the sun February 19 (27°) and October 11 (18°). (2) As an evening star, east of the sun, setting about lh. 25m. after the sun, January 6-14, April 13-21 and December 22-30. He will be furthest east of the sun January 10 (19°) ind December 24 (20°).

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On two other occasions Mercury will be at his greatest angular distance from sun, but other conditions will be such as to render it difficult if not impossible see him.

Look for a red "star" near the sunrise or sunset points of the horizon about hour before sunrise or an hour after sunset within the limits of the dates given ar you will be very apt to catch this elusive planet.

Venus will be brightest as an evening star January 7, and as a morning ste March 18-19. At the beginning of the year she will be an evening star and so cor tinue until February 12, after which she will be a morning star until November 2 and then an evening star until the end of the year. On February 12 she will pal between the earth and sun (inferior conjunction), and on November 26 she will be the opposite side of the earth from the sun (superior conjunction). This planet very beautiful when at or near her greatest brilliancy, and at such times will cast distinct shadow in the dark of the moon: An added feature of interest is her phase for in the course of her orbit she presents all the phases of the moon and with a fá greater difference in apparent size or diameter, as shown by the annexed figures:

EXPLANATION: A-15 days befo superior conjunction, or November 1 1910. B-At greatest elongation (angula distance) west of the sun, April 23, 191 C-When brightest as a morning sta March 18-19, 1910. D-Just after in ferior conjunction, February 17-28, 191 E-15 days after superior conjunctio December 11, 1910. F-At greatest elor gation east of the sun, July 7, 1911. GWhen brightest as evening sta January 1-10, 1910. H–Just before in ferior conjunction, February 1, 1910.

All these phases may be seen by th aid of a small telescope or gold fiel

glass. The motion of Venus past th stars is so rapid that it is very interesting to follow her in her journeyings.

As he orbit is within that of the Earth's she will more than make the circuit of the heaven in a year.

In connection with the following data, see “Chart of the Heavens," als table of "Rising, Southing and Setting of the Planets." Here follows a tour of th heavens, with Venus (time, 365 days):

January 1 as an evening star in V, moving slowly eastward: Stationary Januar 20 in eastern retrogrades, moving slowly west past the stars, until March 3, whe she will be west of her place on January 1 and stationary again. Being at inferio conjunction February 12 she will not be visible for a few days before and after tha date. As a morning star she will first be seen low in the east the last week in Feb ruary, and will advance with increasing velocity past the stars until August 5: the her daily rate of motion will decrease until October 8 and then increase until Decem ber 20. As shown by the figure, she will appear largest early in February and steadil diminish in size throughout almost the entire year, until at the last she will be ap parently only one-thirty-sixth of her size in February.

On April 23 she will attain her greatest angular distance west of the Sun (46° appearing. as in B in the figure, a half-moon phase. with the illuminated hemispher toward the Sun. Throughrut May, June and July, Venus and Saturn will be more less close companions in the eastern morning sky. June 5 they will be only four min utes of arc, or one-eighth of the Moon's apparent diameter, apart, Venus being th most northern. On the previous day (June 4) the Moon will pass south of and clos to them, but too late in the morning to see them at the time of nearest approac Both will be occulted by the Moon on this occasion. This grouping of these three bodie will take place near the boundary line between # and p. By June 25 Venus will b only 5° below the Pleiades, and by July 6 about the same distance above (N.) Aldebaran, the brightest star of the Hyades. On or about Julv 20 she will be clos to the great Crab Nebula in 8, and between the tips of the Bull's horns, with th glorious Capella just above (N.) and the brilliant Orion nearly equally distant belo her. From this time on she will rise later and later, until the time of her superi conjunction on November 26, becoming invisible considerably before that date. August 10 she will be nearest to and just south of Castor and Pollux, in Ol, and o September 10. Regulus, in the handle of the Sickle in n will be close to and south her. About the last we shall see of her, as she becomes lost in the morning twiligh she will be about 5° above (N.) of Spica in mwith Mars just south of hera beaut ful stellar combination in the twilight. When she is next visible she will be on th other (E.) side of the sun as an evening star. the last half of December, being ju above the Milkmaid's Dipper in f. See “Conjunctions, etc,' for various conjunction with the Moon.

Mars will not be conspicuously hright at any time this year. He will be a evening sta: until September 27 and afterward a morning star. At the beginning the year he will be in eastern # and close to h. having been in ó with the ringe planet December 31, 1969, when was only 30 N. of h. Bq March 10 he will ha advanced to eastern P, just below the seven stars cr Pleiades, and the last week March he will pass irst alore the Hyades. April 20 he will be about midway betwee Canella on the N. and the Belt of Orion on the S.; by June 1 in ( S. of Castor an Pollux. and August 1 close to and N. of Regulus in the Sickle in N. His conjun tion with Spica Virginis and Venus October 24 has already been alluded to unde

Abou

'Venus," when o will be 30 N. of Spica and (October 22) less than 1° S. of .. At he close of the year he will be in m close to and above (N.) of the red star Antares.

Jupiter will be brightest March 31, as an evening star. He will be an evening tar from January 4 to October 19. and a morning star until January 4 and after Ictober 19. At the beginning of the year he will be in m and remain in that conteilation until November, when he enters .. October 1 he will pass 3° N. of Spica, etting in the evening twilight. The superior planets, those exterior to the earth, ay be very properly called "all night” stars at or close to the time of their opposion, or when they rise at sunset and set at sunrise. This will be approximately the ise with 4 until March 31.

Saturn will be brightest October 27, being at that time an all night star. Не nay also be considered an evening star until April 16 and after July 30, and as a norning star from April 16 to July 30. He will be in eastern # and will cross the ne into p and return again into # at the close of the year. At no time will he e near any bright stars for which he might be mistaken. His wonderful ring system vill be best seen during the summer months.

Uranus will be brightest July 16 as an evening star, and then only faintly isible to the naked eye.

Neptune will be brightest as an evening star January 8. Both Uranus and ieptune are too distant and faint to be objects of general interest.

ECLIPSES, 1910. There will be four eclipses this year, two of the Sun and two of the Moon, as ollows:

I. Total of the Sun, May 9, invisible in the United States, visible in the outhern Pacific and Indian oceans.

II. Total of the Moon, May 23-24, beginning on the evening of the 23d, and isible in North, Central and South America, except Alaska. Visible as follows: Partiall Total

Total Partial
Standard Begins Begins/Middle Ends Ends
Time.
H.M. H.M. H.M. H.M. H.M.

ECLIPSE ater-Colonial 11 46 1 9 1 34 1 59

3 22 astern 10 46 09 0 34 059 2 22

NOON entral 9 46 11 9 11 34 11 59 1 22

ARTAS [ountain 8 46 10 9 10 34 10 59

022 acific

7 46 9 9 9 34 9 59 11 22 laskan 6 46 8 9 8 34 8 59 10 22

ECLIPSE IZ Hawaiian *5 15 6 38 7 3 7 28 8 51

MAY 23-24

FIG. 1 *Before sunset.

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III. Partial of the Sun, November 2, invisible in United States, except Alaska nd Hawaiian Islands. Visible as follows:

Yakutat, Alaska, marks the eastern limit of the eclipse. Throughout Alaska rest of Yakutat, and Hawaii, the sun will set more or less eclipsed. Begins, Honoalu, 3:45 p. m.; size, digit. Begins, Nome, Alaska, 1:39 p. m.; size, 5 digits t sunset. Mean tin:e. IV. Total of the Moon, November 16, visible as follows:

See Fig. 1, upper por

tion, for the path of Partial Total

Total Partial

the Moon through the Standard Begins Begins Middle Ends Ends

Earth's shadow, from
Time.
H.M. H.M. H.M. H.M. HI.M.

West to East, passing nter-Colonial

6 44 7 55 81 8 47 1 9 58 from (a) to (c) in 2h. astern 5 44 6 55 7 21 7 47

8 58

7m. entral

4 44 5 55 6 21 6 47 7 58 As the figure indicates, Countain

Moon 4 55 5 21 5 47 6 58 the first eclipse of the acific

4 21 4 47 5 28 Moon, May 23-24, occurs laskan.

Rises.
Eclipsed.

4 58 when the Moon is at her lawaiiant ..!

ascending node, while

this one takes place at tInvisible.

the other or descending

node. VESTA, THE PLANETOID. Vesta, the brightest of the Asteroids and the only one ever visible to the naided eye when brightest, may be seen in September and October, being brightest 7 October 28. She will then be in the constellation Cetus, the whale. Her motion ill be westward past the stars in the head of the whale. The last of September he will be almost two degrees from the brightest star of the constellation, Menkar; arly in November, five degrees north of Mira, the wonderful variable star. It will e interesting to watch her pass one degree north of Gamma Ceti on October 10, and ur degrees north of Delta Ceti on the 13th. These stars are of the fourth magitude or about two degrees brighter than Vesta. On October 28 Vesta will be

the meridian at midnight and about 47 degrees up from the southern horizon in titude 40 degrees. She will not be well situated for visibility again until Februy, 1912.

MERIDIAN PASSAGE, RISING AND SETTING OF THE PLANETS.

Washington Mean time. All P. M. figures are in black type.

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-Sets

-Sets-
Ir-Rises-

-SetsH MH MH MH MH MH MH MH MH MH MH MH January

11 3 01 8 281 8 11 6 251 0 441 0 52 6 101 0 14! 0 24 6 221 0 361 0 42 January

1il 391 8 15 8 3 6 51 0 30 0 41 5 33 11 47 11 52 5 44 11 54 11 58 January

21 2 5 7 481 7 39 6471 0 17 0 31 4 5611 10/11 16 5 6 11 17 11 21 February 11 1 101 6 57 6 50 5 281 0 4 0 18 4 1310 27 10 33 4 25 10 36 10 41 February 11) Sol Rises, 5 11 11 501 0 11 3 291 9 43 9 48 3 49 10 210 7 February 21 12th) mo. mo. 4 56 11 39 0 3 2 52 9 5 9 10 3 13 9 29 9 32 March

1/10 281 481 4 59 4 44 11 31 11 55 2 18 8 261 8 35 2 45 8 59 g 6 March

11 9 53 17 4 29 4 30 11 21 11 47| 1 35 7471 8 0 2 9 8 23 8 30 March

21 9 31 3 56 4 8 4 16 11 11 11 38 0 47) Sets 1 34 7 501 7 57 April

1 9 171 3 401 3 52 2 11 0 11 30 11 581 5 571 5 54 0 561 7 131 7 21 April

11 9 10 3 29 3 39 4910 50/11 2011 141 5 131 5 SOS Rises April

21) 9 7 3 21 3 28 3 37 10 39 11 7 10 31) 4 39) 4 29 Inv.) mo. May

1 9 6 3 12 3 16 3 25 10 28 10 58 9 481 3 42 3 41 11 14 4 54 4 Мау.

3 1

13 10 15 10 461 9 6 3 9 3 7 10 38 417 4 Мау.

0/10 0/10 31 8 251 228 228 10 3 3 41 3 30

7 411 1 53 153 9 25 3 2 2 51 June. 9 131 2

ning 2 1 5 1 5 8 491 2 25) 2 14 June

6 24 0 27 0 26 8 14 1 50 1 37 July 9 26 2 41

54711 44 11 42 7 37 1 12 July

5 11 11
711 6

7 1 0 351
July.
21 9 471 2

38 8 15 8 34 4 36 10 31 10 29 6 24 12 August. 1/10

1 22 754 8 10 3 59 9 53 9 49 August. 11/10 13

7 33 7 46 3 251 9 18 9 14 5 August.

21 10 251 3 373 13 051 711 721 | 2 52 8 43 8 38 4 25 10 September. 110 36) 3 56 3 36 34) 6 48 6 55 2 16 8 5 7 59| 3 41 91 September. 11/10 461 4 15 4

261 6 30 1 44 7 31 7 24 September 21 10 53 4 33 4 23

-Rises

i i2) 657 849 2 24 October 111 0 4 50 4 46

mo. mo. 0 411 6 24 6 16 1 381 7 17 October

11 11 61 5 21 5 9 11 31 5 401 5 45 Ot Rises 0 56 6 36 623 October

21 11 13 5 20 5 34 11 15 5 311 5 39 Inv.) mo. mo. 0 101 5511 5 November.. 1 11 21 5 59 6 11 0 5 22 53 11 41 5 27 5 39 11 23 November.. 11 11 301 671 6 25 10 46 514 5 28 10 33 4 581 5 10 10 41 November 211 00 Sets 10 33 5 7 9 581 4 24 4 38 9 59 December 1) Inv.) éve. eve.10 201 4 591 5 19 9 30 3 581 4 12 9 17) 3 December 111 0 91 11 4 41 10 8 4 52) 5 14 8 58 3 271 3 42 8 36 December 21) 0 25 5 25 4 55 9 571 4 451 5 10 8 26 2 57 3 12|| December.. 1 31 0 401 5 43 5 13 9 471 4 401 5 6) 753 2 24 2 411 g *26th.

+27th. 119th. 816th. SITUATION OF THE PLANETS FOR THE SUNDAYS; ALSO MOON'S POSI

TION FOR THE YEAR.

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Apogee... 431

15

3-30 3 Perigee.. 17

3-301 24 Highest.. 22

511-29 Lowest... 9

20 2 Ascend ing Node. 21

16

6 3-301 26 U Descend. ing Node. 8 4 3430/ 26 23 20 17

9 6 2-30 27 - On

Equator..) 2—16 12—26 12—258–226–192–15—29/12—261923 5–1912–1930 13—26/10—23

Feb. F

Oct. 3o &

8–30

LVIN

Explanation of Signs.—p Aries. 8 Taurus. O Gemini. Cancer. 22 Leo. m Virgo. A Libra. m Scorpio. Sagittarius. y Capricornus. o Aquarius.

Pisces. The place indicated for the planets is for the first, second, third, fourth TE and fifth Sundays of each month, in the order of the planets.

Note. — The Moon will “run high" from "Lowest" to "Highest," and "run low" from "Highest" to "Lowest." The Full Moon will be highest of the year at meridian passage December 16 and lowest June 22. She will begin to run lower March 21 and decrease in altitude until June 22, and then increase ("run higher") until December 21, after which she will gradually get lower until June 22. This because the Full Moon must always be on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, and hence when the Sun is lowest in declination the Moon must be st, and when the Sun is highest the Moon must be lowest. The difference between extremes being 57° or (234° +5°)x2, 5° being the inclination of the orbit of the Moon to the ecliptic.

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7 42 am. 260 $ 0. Inferior.

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6

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27

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23 ent. 2, Aut. begins.
80
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6 Apr. 6

4
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pm.
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5 43 am.
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2
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1 43 am.

pm.
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12
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h 1° 28' s.
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6
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1° 5' N.

7

am.

6 23 Gr. El.W. of O, 46° 13' 10 am.

90° 11' N.

am. May 2 Gr.El. E. of O, 20° 55' 11 am.

8 ŏ 0° 20' N.

pm. 93° 54' N. 59

1° 39' S. - 0° 23° N.

31

27 0° 58' S. 90. Tot. ecl. Inv.

Nov. 1

90° 28' S.

6 37 am 11 o 1° 57' S. 7 38 am.

20. Partial eclipse. Invisible. 19

1 59 am. 4 3° 5' s.

3 $ 0.

4 $ 0° 10's.

am. Total eclipse.

Visible.

4 3. o 0° 33' s. 9 am.
$ 0. Inferior.
25

0
pm.
12 $ 0. Superior,

9

am. 27 in Aphelion: 3

8 53 am. pm.

h 1° 13' S. 29 o ♡

Visible. đ 1° 59' N.

pm.

Total eclipse. June 2 Stationary. 6

8 am.

Superior.

am. ? 0° 13' N. 7 44 am.

28

27 0° 23' S.
h 0° 2. N.
9 32 am.

Oc.
h. 0° 4' N

9
am.
Dec. 1

2° 2' N.
9
03° 6' S.
11 8 pm.
12

4 48 pm.

h 1° 2' S.
15
13° 9 s.
8 48 am.

22 ent. 1, Winter begins 11 50 am. 19

1 Gr. El.W. of O, 22° 48' 9 pm.

24 Gr. El. W. of O, 20°.

pm. 22 ent. 5, Sum. begins. 2 32 am.

9 12 am.

26 ». 20° 16' N. 27 ho. h 90° E. of O. 12

85 pm, pm. 28

đ 1° 38 N.

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