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LESSON 87.

How to Make Application

KEY WORDS: IN MAKING APPLICATIONS PLACE

THE EMPHASIS ON THE APPLICANT, AND GIVE THE

IMPORTANT DATA BRIEFLY.

You know how embarrassing it is to make application for a position. You know how discouraging it is not to be successful.

How should you speak in order to be successful?

Here are some methods of approach that are wrong. See if you can explain what is wrong with every one of these expressions:

1. Do you want to hire me to work here?

2. Have you a vacancy that I can fill?

3. Hew much do you pay for clerical work?

4. Would it do me any good to apply here?

What is the psychological way to overcome your own embarrassment, and to interest your prospective employer? Think out the answer.

Look at the poor approaches given above. On which person does every one of those expressions put the emphasis? «

Notice: Every question puts the emphasis on "you," the employer.

Where should it be?

On "I," the applicant.

Now notice the difference in these good approaches:

1. I worked in the Avery Library three and a half years as librarian.

2. I was head bookkeeper for Stern and Davis, who have gone out of business.

3. I have just been graduated from the Wells Commercial School, where I specialized in secretarial work.

4. Mr. Jacob Gorham, for whom I was draughtsman, suggested that I apply here for a position as draughtsman.

In your first sentence throw emphasis on yourself. In your following sentences continue the lead. Tell in a few quick sentences, what you have actually done.

Speak about yourself, and you increase your self-confidence.

Tell the facts simply, as facts; briefly, without conceit, and you will make a good impression.

Conceit is fatal. Avoid bragging, boastfulness, or "talking big." Talk simply, but give all the tacts.

Leave until the last whatever you have to say about hours and wages.

Learn this summary:

1. Put all the emphasis on yourself.

2. Give your most convincing point first.

3. Give your working history briefly and simply.

4. Avoid any show of conceit.

5. Speak last about hours and wages.

PROBLEM.

Think out the words you will use in applying for a position exactly similar to the one you now hold.

LESSON 88.

How to Canvass for Subscriptions

KEY WORDS: IN EVERY CANVASS STATE YOUR PRINCIPAL ERRAND AT ONCE, AND LATER ON ASSIGN A DEFINITE ACTION AS AN "EXPECTATION."

Sooner or later you will be called upon to take part in a canvass of some sort. You will be given a list of names and addresses, or you will be assigned to a certain district. How will you conduct your canvass in the most efficient way?

1. If you have a list of names and address, arrange the names according to addresses.

2. Lay out a route just as the postman does, so that you may go from address to address without retracing your steps.

How shall you speak when you have found the proper address?

Consider, first, to whom you shall speak.

Suppose that a child, a servant, or an attendant of some sort, meets you.

3. Ask for the person whom you wish to see, and send him your personal card. It is sometimes advisable to write a word of explanation, such as "The Business Men's League."

4. In any case, avoid any but the most general explanation to anyone but the person whom you wish to see.

Imagine, then, that you have, at last, come face to face with the desired person.

5. Explain the general nature of your errand:

"'The Business Men's League' is making a canvass to raise a fund to aid the families of employees who lost their lives in the war." That is your general thesis. That is the thesis that interested you, and set you to work. Tell it first.

6. Give some of the supporting details that will lead to favorable action.

"It is the intent of the committee to raise $500,000. We have just begun work, but already we have $126,000. Everyone is in favor of it."

7. Now tell what has been done by someone from whom little might have been expected. There is no more powerful inducement. You may be sure that the one to whom you talk will wish to equal those to whom he feels superior.

"Brown and Simpkins—we really expected nothir, r from them—gave $1,000. The Hutton Company gave $1,500."

8. Then add information about more important people. "The Gray Brothers, of course, gave liberally. They gave $25,000."

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