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the piece, or from imported woven-edge cloth, and of carbon paper in the manufacture of which tissue paper wholly imported is used. T. D. 21726.

Typewriter ribbons, manufactured by the Carter's Ink Company, of Boston, Mass., from imported nainsook or woven-edge cloth. T. D. 21726, extended. T. D. 28942.

Typewriter ribbons, manufactured by the Schlegel Manufacturing Company, of Rochester, N.Y., wholly with the use of imported cotton yarn. T. D. 29396.

Typewriter ribbons, manufactured by Mittag & Volger, New York City. T. D. 29532.

Typewriter ribbons, manufactured by Union Typewriter Company, Bridgeport, Conn. T. D. 29879.

Typewriter ribbon cloth, for and on account of Hormann, Schutte & Co., of New York City, by the Standard Bleachery Company, of Carlton Hill, N. J., with the use of imported unbleached muslin. T. D. 28792.

Typewriter ribbon cloth and slit ribbon cloth, manufactured for and on account of Hormann, Schutte & Co., of New York City, with the use of imported unbleached muslin. T. D. 28792, 29225, revoked. T. D. 29333.

Umbrellas, manufactured by Rose Bros. & Hartman, of Lancaster, Pa., wholly or in part from imported materials; allow under T. D. 9983.

Umbrellas and parasols, with cases and ties, manufactured by Burchell Brothers, of New York, N.Y., from silk, silk mixed, or cotton imported in the piece. T. D. 22068.

Umbrellas and parasols: Extension of T. D. 22068, for drawback on umbrellas and parasols furnished with cases and ties, manufactured by Burchell Brothers, to similar manufactures by Follmer, Clogg & Co., of New York, N.Y. T. D. 24344.

Umbrellas and parasols: T. D. 22068, extended to cover umbrellas and parasols, manufactured by Rose Brothers & Co., of Lancaster, Pa., the fabrics of which are made from imported materials. T. D. 25758.

Umbrelias, parasols, and cane handles, manufactured by Morgenstern & Goldsmith, of New York City, with the use of imported parts, known as tops, posts, and mounts. T. D. 27903.

Umbrella handles and frames, umbrella sticks and walking sticks, mounted or trimmed, or both, manufactured by Switzer & Schussel, of New York, N.Y., wholly or in part from imported materials, unassembled or plain. T. D. 20667.

Underwear garments of the brands "Flaxall," "Wallace," and "Rex," manufactured by the Linen Underwear Company, of Greenwich, N.Y., wholly or in part from imported linen yarn and linen cloth. T. D. 28375.

Underwear, knit. (See Knit underwear.)

Underwear, Wright's Health, manufactured by the Wright's Health Underwear Company, of Troy, N.Y., with the use of imported cotton yarns. T. D. 26323, extended. T. D. 28153.

Vacuum brakes. (See Railway cars.)

Vacuum special hard grease, No. 3, manufactured by the Vacuum Oil Company, of Rochester, N.Y., in part of imported fish-oil cake. T. D. 24641.

Valves, cornet. (See Cornets.)

Varnish, manufactured wholly from imported alcohol, and shellac; base allowance on quantity of such alcohol used, to be determined by official weight or measure of the exported article,

(Note.- Accuracy and precision in customs proceedings are so essential to the interests of importers that the services of a competent broker are usually worth vastly more than the small cost of such services.)

and ascertainment of percentage of alcohol contained therein, from samples taken as ordered by the collector, and submitted to a Government chemist for analysis.

When the quantity of exported varnish is found by a United States gauger, the chemist shall report percentage of alcohol by volume, and if quantity is found by a United States weigher, such percentage shall be reported by weight.

The quantity of alcohol found, by reference to weigher's returns and chemist's reports of percentages by weight, may be reduced to gallons of absolute alcohol by dividing the number of pounds of such alcohol found by 6.62.

Manufacturer's declaration on drawback entry must show quantity or percentage by volume of alcohol in exported varnish.

Varnish (see, also, Black varnishes), manufactured by Wm. Zinsser & Co., of New York, N.Y., in the manufacture of which no other than imported alcohol has been used. T. D. 23886.

Varnishes: Regulations, T. D. 22069, amended in particular of official weighing of exported black varnishes and japans. T. D. 25246.

Veilings, manufactured by Stern & Stern, of New York, N.Y., with the use of marabout or mousseline de soie. T. D. 24128.

Veilings, chiffon. (See Chiffon veilings.)

Veils and veilings, manufactured from imported netting and Tuxedo veiling, chiffon, mousseline de soie, marabouts, and malines, by Weil Brothers, New York. T. D. 25548.

Velveteen dress binding, manufactured by the Kursheedt Manufacturing Company, of New York City, in part from velveteen imported in the piece; allow under T. D. 16596.

Velvets, silk. (See Silk velvets.)
Velvets, Zanoni. (See Zanoni rugs and velvets.)

Venetian blinds, manufactured by the Burlington Venetian Blind Company, of Burlington, Vt., in part with the use of imported, interwoven, cotton ladder tape. T. D. 28683.

Ventilator, car. (See Railway cars.)
Vermilion colors, dry. (See Dry Colors.)

Vests: Department's regulations, T. D. 27389, extended to cover men' clothing, manufactured by Heidelberg, Wolff & Co., of New York City, from imported fancy vestings. T. D. 28192.

Vienna sweet chocolate, manufactured by Runkel Bros., of New York. T. D. 18474.

Victor innersoling, manufactured by the Chandler Oil Cloth and Buckram Company, of East Taunton, Mass., .in part from imported burlap. T. D. 24650.

Victor talking machines. (See Talking machines.)
Vitriol, blue. (See Sulphate of copper.)

Vulcanized rubber and steel truss springs, manufactured by the Vulcanized Rubber Company, of New York, with the use of imported spring steel. T. D. 29325.

Wagons. (See Carriages and wagons.)

Waists, ladies', manufactured by Kauffman & Harris, of Philadelphia, in part from imported laces and embroideries. T. D. 25210, extended. T. D. 29213.

Waists, ladies' silk, manufactured by J. & M. Cohn, of New York, with the use of imported Japanese or Habutai silk. T. D. 25210.

Waists and suits, manufactured by the Silberberg Brothers

(Note.-Accuracy and precision in customs proceedings are so essential to the interests of importers that the services of a competent broker are usually worth vastly more than the small cost of such services.)

Waist Company, of New York City, with the use wholly or in part of imported materials. T. D. 28980.

Wall coverings, manufactured by H. B. Wiggin's Sons of Bloomfield, N. J., wholly with the use of imported burlaps. T. D. 23235.

Wall coverings, manufactured by the Tex-Ta-Dor-Na Manufacturing Company, of Columbus, Ohio, with the use of imported burlaps. T. D. 23235, extended. T. D. 27105.

Wall coverings: T. D. 23235, extended to cover wall coverings, manufactured by Joseph Bancroft Sons Company, of Wilmington, Del., with the use of imported burlaps. T. D. 27268.

Wall coverings: T. D. 23235, extended to cover wall coverings, manufactured by the Cott-a-lap Company, of New Haven, Conn., with the use of imported burlap. T. D. 27599.

Wall coverings, manufactured for and on account of F. A. Foster & Co., of Boston, Mass., by the Waltham Bleachery and Dye Works, of Waltham, Mass., wholly with the use of imported burlaps. T. D. 23235, extended. T. D. 29355.

Wall coverings, manufactured by the Richter Manufacturing Company, of Tenafly, N. J., with the use of imported burlaps and other woven materials. T. D. 27316.

Washington powder, gold dust. (See Gold dust washing powder.)

Wastage allowance: Box shooks and wooden boxes. (See Box shooks and wooden boxes.)

Wastage allowance: Lead, articles manufactured from. (See Lead.)

Washers, lead. (See Lead washers.)
Washtubs. (See Bath and wash tubs.)

Watches and parts of watches, manufactured wholly or in part of imported materials. T. D. 20581.

Watches, manufactured by D. Gruen, Sons & Co., of Cincinnati, Ohio, with the use of imported movements, allowed under T. D. 20581. T. D. 27521.

Watches and watch movements, manufactured by the Trenton Watch Company, of Trenton, N. J. T. D. 21963.

Watches, Waterbury. (See Waterbury watches.)

Watch men's clocks, manufactured by the Newman Clock Company, of Chicago, Ill., from imported clock movements and domestic metal cases and keys. T. D. 22800.

Watchmen's clocks: Department's instructions, T. D. 22800, extended to cover watchmen's clocks, manufactured by E. Imhauser & Co., of New York, N.Y. T. D. 23924.

Watchmen's clocks and keys, manufactured by E. O. Hausburg, of New York, with the use of imported works, metal cases, and key blanks. T. D. 22800, extended. T. D. 29283.

Watchmen's time clocks. (See Clocks.)

Water gates, manufactured in part from imported pig iron by the Florence Iron Works, of Florence, N. J. T. D. 24694.

Water gauges of locomotives. (See Locomotive parts.)

Water pipe, manufactured by William Cramp & Sons' Ship and Engine Building Company, of Philadelphia, Pa., in part from imported pig iron. T. D. 24227.

Water pipe, manufactured by the Holthoff Machinery Company, of Cudahy, Wis., for Joseph T. Ryerson & Son, of Chicago, Ill., wholly from imported iron plates. T. D. 24229.

Water pipe, cast-iron. (See Cast-iron water pipe.)
Water pipe, cast-iron, and other castings, manufactured by

(Note.-Accuracy and precision in customs proceedings are so essential to the interests of importers that the services of a competent broker are usually worth vastly more than the small cost of such services.)

the Central Foundry Company, of New York City, with the use of imported pig iron. T. D. 24227, extended. T. D. 28753.

Water-tube steam boilers, manufactured by the Babcock & Wilcox Company, of New York, N.Y., with the use in part of imported wrought-steel headers. T. D. 22067.

Water wheels. (See Turbine and other water wheels and power transmitting machinery.)

Waterbury watches, manufactured by the Waterbury Watch Company, of Waterbury, Conn., in part from imported balances, crystals, dials, hair springs, and sheet steel; allow under T. D. 12265.

Water, Florida. (See Toilet waters, etc., and Barry's Florida water.)

Water-tube steam boilers, manufactured by the Babcock & Wilcox Company, of New York, N.Y., with the use in part of imported wrought-steel headers. T. D. 22067.

Waterproof clothing, manufactured by A. J. Tower, of Boston, Mass., in part from imported linseed oil; allow under T. D. 12051.

Waterproofed cloths: Department's instructions of May 17, 1899; to the collector of customs at New York, N.Y., regarding waterproofed cloths, manufactured by the “Rigby process, in so far as they are applicable, extended to cover waterproofed cloth manufactured by the Rhode Island Worsted Company, of Indian Orchard, Mass. T. D. 23913.

Weighing machines, manufactured by E. & T. Fairbanks & Co., of St. Johnsbury, Vt., with the use of imported pig iron. T. D. 24710, amended. T. D. 27993.

Welting. (See Leather welting.)
Welting, leather. (See Leather welting.)
Wheels. (See Locomotive and railway car wheels.)
Wheels, car. (See Locomotive and railway car wheels.)

Wheels, locomotive and railway car. (See Locomotive and railway car wheels.)

White lead. T. D. 18117.

White lead (dry or in oil), manufactured by the National Lead Company, of New York City, and the Chadwick Lead Works, of Boston, Mass., from imported pig lead or pig lead and oil; allow under T. D.'s 10692, 1178 and 15108.

White lead, dry" or "in oil," manufactured by Harrison Bros. & Co., Incorporated, of Philadelphia, Pa., from none but imported metallic lead. T. D. 24384.

White lead, dry, manufactured by the United Lead Company, of New York City, wholly with the use of imported pig lead. T. D. 27927.

White lead in oil, manufactured by the National Lead Company, of New York, manufactured in part from imported linseed oil, or oil produced wholly from imported linseed. T. D. 23294.

White lead in oil, manufactured from reimported dry white lead, dutiable under paragraph 483, act of 1897. T. D. 23899.

White lead, in oil and in water, manufactured by the United Lead Company, of New York City, in part with the use of imported pig lead. T. D. 27927, extended. T. D. 29284,

White lead, red lead, orange mineral, and litharge, manufactured by William J. Matheson & Co., Limited, of New York, N.Y., manufactured in whole from imported lead. T. D. 22976.

White metal, manufactured by Holmes, Booth & Hayden, of

(Note.- Accuracy and precision in customs proceedings are so essential to the interests of importers that the services of a competent broker are usually worth vastly more than the small cost of such services.)

Waterbury, Conn., in part from imported nickel; allow under T. D. 11734.

Wilton rugs, manufactured by Harrison, Townsend & Co., of Norristown, Pa., in part from imported Botany worsted yarns; allow under T. D. 16610.

Windows, railway car. (See Railway cars.)
Window sash, glazed. (See Glazed window sash.)

Windsor ties, manufactured by Mendelsohn Bros., of New York City, wholly from "Habutai” and other Japanese silks imported in the piece; allow under T. D. 16903.

Wine of cardui. (See Cardui.)

Wintersmith's tonic, manufactured by Arthur Peter & Co., of Louisville, Ky., partly from imported alcohol. T. D. 23157.

Wintersmith's tonic, manufactured by Arthur Peter & Co., of Louisville, Ky., with the use of imported alcohol and sugar refined from imported raw sugar. T. D. 24926

Wintersmith's vino tonico, manufactured by Arthur Peter & Co., of Louisville, Ky., with the use of imported alcohol and hard refined sugar made from imported raw sugar. T. D. 24926, amended. T. D. 27094.

Wire, copper-nickel, manufactured by the Driver-Harris Wire Company, of Harrison, N. J., wholly with the use of imported copper-nickel alloy bars. T. D. 28754.

Wire and hemp cable. (See Wire rope.)

Wire and wire fencing, round, plain, or galvanized, manufactured by the American Steel and Wire Company from steel billets produced by the Maryland Steel Company, of Sparrow Point, Md., in part from imported materials. T. D. 17355, 22890 and 22997.

Wire, barbed, manufactured by the Consolidated Steel Wire Co., Allentown, Pa. T. D. 18048.

Wire, boning and back, manufactured by M. Cohn & Co. T. D. 18035.

Wire cables. (See Wire rope.)

Wire fencing, composed of round wire, galvanized or ungalvanized, entitled to drawback when exported as wire; base allowance on quantity of such wire appearing in the exported fencing.

The manufacturer's declaration on the drawback entry must show, separately, the quantity and gauge of the wire appearing in the strands, barbs, and staples of the fencing, and give the particulars of the manufacture of such wire, as required in case of “Wire, round, plain or galvanized.”

In liquidating entries for drawback on wire fencing, allowance for wastage of materials for the strands, barbs, and staples shall be made as on the different kinds and sizes of wire used, if exported separately.

The quantity of the exported fencing shall be determined by a United States weigher and samples shall be taken as ordered by the collector, for export official verification of the declarations of the manufacturer and exporter as to sizes, and relative quantities of wire used and percentages of spelter adhering thereto.

Wire fencing (barbed), manufactured by the Consolidated Steel and Wire Company (Iowa Barbed Wire Department), of Allentown, Pa., from steel billets made by the Maryland Steel Company, of Sparrow Point, Md., from imported iron ore and ferromanganese, and delivered to said Consolidated Steel and

(Note.—Accuracy and precision in customs proceedings are so essential to the interests of importers that the services of a competent broker are usually worth vastly more than the small cost of such services.)

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