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VIII. How to Read....

.Noah Porter 235

IX. Washington Asks Pardon..

236

X. The Frost*..

Miss Hannah F. Gould 236

XI. Sir Isaac Newton..

.Bulfinch 238

XII. Life Compared to a River.

Robert Hall 239

XIII. The Ship on Fire*..

Charles Mackay 240

XIV. Old Things.

242

XV. The Rain..

243

XVI. The Old Oaken Bucket*. .Samuel Woodworth 244

XVII. The Iron Age..

. Journal of Mines 245

XVIII. Pleasant Homes..

.J. G. Holland 246

XIX. The Home of my Childhood*. Graham's Magazine 248

XX. Words Fitly Spoken......

. Extracts 249

XXI. The History of Postage Stamps... St. Nicholas 251

XXII. The Daisy*.

.James Montgomery 252

XXIII. The Structure of Birds..

254

XXIV. A Touching Plea for Birds... Henry Bergh (adapted) 257

XXV. Sowing*

258

XXVI. The World we Live in... T. De Witt Talmadge 259

XXVII. Scene from the Little Merchant... Maria Edgeworth 261

XXVIII. Clear the Way*.

263

XXIX. Iceland....

Picture Gallery of Nations 265

XXX. Life in Russia..

Marshall Jewell 267

XXXI. Beautiful Handg*.

268

XXXII. Androcles and the Lion....

T. Day 269

XXXIII. How to Move an Audience..

.Herries 271

XXXIV. The Old Barn*...

Alfred B. Street 272

XXXV. The Shell on the Shore.. English Magazine 275

XXXVI. Fidelity Rewarded...

276

XXXVII. The Three Bells*.

..John G. Whittier 279

XXXVIII. Decisive Integrity...

William Wirt 281

XXXIX. The Petrified Forests of California..

283

XL. The King's Picture*.

285

XLI. An End of all Perfection.. .Lydia H. Sigourney 286

XLII. Ossian's Address to the Sun

289

XLIII. Auction Extraordinary* ...... Lucretia Davidson 290

XLIV. The Mocking Bird of America ..J. J. Audubon 291

XLV. The Mocking Bird's Song*

.J. R. Drake 293

XLVI. The American Indian.... Charles Sprague 295

XLVII. Nicholas Nickleby Seeking for a Situation. . Dickens 296

XLVIII. Tell me, ye Winged Winds*. ... Charles Mackay 301

XLIX. The Bobolink..

Washington Irving 302

L. The Two Sisters*.

Felicia D. Hemans 304

LI. Branches or Types of Animals...

308

LII. Precepts.

. Sir Matthew Hale 310

LIII. The Solitary Reaper*

Wm. Wordsworth 311

LIV. A Fable....

Theodore Parker 312

LV. Cheerfulness .

313

LVI. Better than Gold*.

Alexander Smart 315

LVII. Home A Mother's Love

Albert Barnes 316

LVIII. Gil Blas and the Old Archbishop...A. R. Le Sage 318

LIX. Charcoal's Story*.

.Happy Hours 322

LX. Sponge....

Manual of Commerce 323

LXI. Small Beginnings not to be Despised...

326

LXII. An April Day*.

.... Geoffrey Chaucer 329

LXIII. Death of Alexander Hamilton . .Pres. Nott 330

LXIV. The Grave of Aaron Burr..

332

LXV. Ring Out, Wild Bells * Alfred Tennyson 334

LXVI. An Army of Monkeys..

Lieut. Reid 335

LXVII. Enthusiasm Necessary to Success.Prof. W. Mathews 338

LXVIII. Spring*.

Mary Howitt 339

LXIX. God only can Satisfy our Affections.W.E. Channing 340

LXX. Paper.....

341

LXXI. The Winds*.

Hannah F. Gould 344

LXXII. A Curtain Lecture of Mrs. Caudle. Douglas Jerrold 346

LXXIII. Educated Observers

... Hearth and Home 349

LXXIV. Longing*.

James Russell Lowell 351

LXXV. Appetite....

.Horace Mann 352

LXXVI. Water-Spouts

354

LXXVII. Solitude*.

William Cowper 355

LXXVIII. Nothing Lives for Itself Alone.... .John Todd 357

LXXIX. The Stranger on the Sill*.

.T.B. Read 360

LXXX. The Sensitive Author..

.R. B. Sheridan 361

LXXXI. Sorrow for the Dead.

Washington Irving 365

LXXXII. Hymn of the Churchyard*. .H. W. Longfellow 368

LXXXIII. Soliloquy of King Richard III. . Wm. Shakespeare 369

LXXXIV. Origin of Yankee Doodle....

370

LXXXV. How the United States came to be called Uncle Sam. 372

LXXXVI. Niagara Falls*.....

.J. S. Buckingham 373

LXXXVII. Death of Absalom.

Bible Willis 376

LXXXVIII. Macaroni and Vermicelli. . Samuel Woodworth 379

LXXXIX. Oratory as an Art.

Sheridan Knowles 381

XC. Passing Away*.

.John Pierpont 383

XCI. Choice Extracts..

Pope, Blair and others 385

XCII. The Bell of Justice.. ..poetry by Longfellow 387

XCIII. The Speech of Brutus..

. Shakespeare 389

XCIV. Antony's Oration over Cæsar's Body* . Shakespeare 390

XCV. Selling Old Things..

.Century 393

[graphic]

If the training of the pupil has so far been in harmony with the teaching of the first three numbers of this series of Readers, little additional direction will be necessary here; if it has not, the application of those principles while teaching from this book will best insure satisfactory results. Specific rules can not make good readers. Expression is (or ought to be) the outward development of internal emotion - nature's method of telling secrets. Rules may be useful as helps, but they can not bind the earnest soul. Its pent-up fires will burst forth uncontrolled by them, seeking only to burn its own thoughts into the souls of others. Any conscious attempt to follow rules necessarily subordinates thought to form and weakens the effect. We can not look at the glass and at the same time distinctly see the view beyond.

A clear understanding of the matter to be read, a full appreciatfon of the thoughts to be expressed, a strong, earnest desire that the hearer should have a like appreciation of them, will naturally guide the voice and manner aright in giving the thoughts utterance. The Rule, then, which outranks, which embraces, all other rules, and without which all other rules are worthless, may be stated in these words:

COMPREHEND AND APPRECIATE THE THOUGHTS TO BE UTTERED — FEEL A NECES

SITY THAT THE HEARERS SHALL AS COMPLETELY COMPREHEND AND APPRE

CIATE THEM.

Add to this, clear and correct pronunciation, and you have the secret of the "beginning and end” of true eloquence.

Of necessity it follows that to secure improvement in the art of reading, the lessons must be carefully studied, - studied so as to become familiar with the forms of the words, with the meaning of the words, with the construction of the sentences, with the meaning of the sentences, and with the methods employed by the author to develop or embody his thoughts.

The analysis of the thought, by means of questions, is important as an aid to securing this understanding and appreciation of the subject matter. Preparing abstracts of the thoughts and incidents narrated, or writing them out more fully, are also important aids to the same end, while, in addition, they train to other results of no less importance.*

Let these things not be neglected. Let every lesson be subjected to one, at least, of these modes of treatment.

To aid the teacher in familiarizing the pupils with the words, those words not found in the first three Readers are placed in the back part of this book, where the new words of each lesson are placed by themselves, in the order of the para. graphs in which they occur, syllabicated, and pronunciation indicated by accent and diacritical marks. The marking is mostly confined to the accented syllable. The italic letters are silent; so are the unmarked vowels when two or more come together (one being marked), and the final e.

* See suggestions in introductions of Model Second and Third Readers.

KEY TO THE PRONUNCIATION OF THE WORD LESSONS.*

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* See also last paragraph on page 9.

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