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If the additions, which I have deemed it my duty to submit to you be approved, the clerkships in the office of the Secretary of State (not including the Patent Office) will be as follows:

Chief clerk, employed under the act of July 27, 1789, $2,500.
Four clerks at $1,600 eacii,
Six clerks at $1,400 each.
One clerk at $1,450.
Two clerks at $1,000.
The number being the same as now authorized by law.

I transmit, for the more particular information of the committee, a copy
of the arrangement of the business assigned to the several clerks in the
Department.
I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

JOHN FORSYTH. Hon. Cave JOHNSON,

Committee of Ways and Means.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, January 26, 1837. Sir: Application having been made, in behalf of the Committee of Ways and Means, for a copy of the letter which I addressed to you on the 18th of February last, respecting the salaries of the clerks in this Department, I now enclose it, together with a copy of the regulations assigning to the various clerks their respective duties. In regard to this letter, it is proper to remark, that it was written principally with a view to the equalisation of the salaries of the clerks in this Department who were engaged in similar duties, and not in reference to a general increase of salaries throughout the Executive Departments, which has since been recommended by the committee, and to effect which a bill was reported to the House of Representatives in May last. I would not have it inferred, therefore, from the letter alluded to, that I think any further increase of compensation than was at that time proposed pot called for by the changes in the expenses of living in the District. In any new arrangement which the committee may contemplate, it is presumed that the apportionment will be made with due reference to the character of the duties to be performed, and the qualificatious they require. It will be seen by the regulations, a copy of which accompanies this letter, thai none of the clerks employed in this Department are employed as mere copyists, but that they all have other and more important services assigned to them. The clerks of the diplomatic bureau, especially, are charged with duties in a high degree ar. duous, responsible, and confidential, which require for their proper discharge superior education and talents, with the strictest integrity. Both justice and public policy demand that their compensation should be in proportion to these requirements; and I earnestly recommend that they should be placed upon a footing at least with the chief clerks of bureaus in the other Departments, and with the principal clerks in the Land Office. From the character of the services performed by the other clerks, it is thought reasonable that the lowest salary should not be less than $1,200 ; the allowance of which would appear to be justified by the scale observed in the adjustment at the last session of the salaries in the Land and Post Offices. With this view, the clerks of this Department should be divided, in respect to compensation, into four grades, the second of which should be upon an equality with the chief clerks of bureaus, and the principal clerks of the Land Office, and that they should be arranged in the following manner :

One of the first grade.
Three of the second grade.
Seven of the third grade.
Two of the fourth grade.

The salary of the translator, which is now $1,600, should also be increased. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

JOHN FORSYTH. Hon. CAVE Johnson.

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29,700

33,200

3,500

• Machinist and draughtsman.

.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

January 10, 1837. Sır: In reply to your letter of the 29th ultimo, I have the honor to inform you that the heads of the several offices (excepting the Auditor of the Post Office Department) were called on for reports as to the clerks in their respective offices, grading their salaries upon the principles established by the act for the reorganization of the Post Office Department. Those reports have been received from all, excepting the Commissioner of the General Land Office, and are herewith transmitted, for the favorable consideration of the cominittee.

As to the clerks in my own office, their salaries, as at present provided for by law, are as follows: One chief clerk

$2,000 00 Three clerks, each

1,600 00 Four clerks, each

1,400 00 Two clerks, each

- 1,150 00 Four clerks, each .

1,000 00 It will be perceived that the grades of clerks in my own office, as well as in the offices of the Secretaries of State, War, and Navy, are different from those in the subordinate bureaus; it being deemed necessary to employ in the executive offices persons on whom would devolve important duties of a highly responsible character; and, consequently, salaries of a higher grade were allowed by law, no doubt for the purpose of securing the services of coinpetent persons: to such were allowed $1,600.

In strict compliance with the request contained in your letter, I should be compelled to merge those clerks with those now receiving $1,400; yet I would suggest to the committee the propriety of still retaining a higher grade of clerks in the executive offices than are employed in the subordinate bureaus.

It may deserve consideration, whether the chief clerk in this and all the Departments should not be placed on an equality corresponding in some degree with the Assistant Postmasters General, and be required to have charge of, and be responsible for, the records and files of the office; and, moreover, be required officially to discharge the duties of the head of the Department, in case of his absence or sickness.

If these views, as to my own clerks, be approved, their salaries would then beOne chief clerk .

$2,500 00 Three clerks, each

1,800 00 Four clerks, each

1,600 00 Two clerks, each

1,400 00 Four clerks, each

1,200 00 Accompanying this is a tabular statement, prepared on this communication and the accompanying reports. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

LEVI WOODBURY,

. Secretary of the Treasury. Hon. C. JOHNSON,

Committee of Ways and Means, H. R.

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TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

First Comptroller's Office, January 3, 1837. Sir: In the communication addressed to you, under date of the 29th ultimo, by the Hon. C. Johnson, of the Committee of Ways and Means, a copy of which has been referred to this office, for a report in relation to the clerks employed in it, he requested that there should be prepared a statement of the clerks in the Treasury Department, and of the salaries they ought to have, so as to place them upon a footing of equality with the clerks in the Post Office Department, as regulated at the last session of Congress.

In compliance with this reference, I have the honor to subjoin hereto the names of the clerks in this office, the salaries they now receive, and the salaries which would place them, in this respect, on an equality with the clerks in the General Post Office Department.

Taking into consideration the enhanced prices of all the necessaries of life, I think I am justified in saying that the salaries of the messenger and assistant messenger in this office are inadequate to the support of themselves and families, and I have therefore taken the liberty to include them in this report, from a conviction that their case is equally entitled to consideration and relief. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE WOLF, Comptroller. Hon. LEVI WOODBURY,

Secretary of the Treasury.

Names of the clerks employed in the First Comptroller's Office, the sala

ries they now receive, and the salaries which would place them on an ; equality with the clerks in the General Post Office Department.

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TREASURY DEPARTMENT,

Second Comptroller's Office, Junuary 2, 1837. Sir: In reply to your communication of the 31st ultimo, relative to the salaries of the clerks in the office of the Second Comptroller, I beg leave to state, that the great amount of business accumulating in this office requires the most assiduous attention of each of the clerks now employed. When it is recollected that the expenditure of every dollar appropriated for the support of the army, the navy, for the pensioners, for the purposes of internal improvement, as also for annuities to the Indians, removal of Indians, and the claims growing out of Indian treaties, is accounted for through this office, and that every account and every voucher is to be critically examined, it will at once be perceived that the force now by law authorized is insufficient, even in ordinary times, to keep pace with the current business. Much more is it inadequate at the present time, in consequence of the increased amount of business arising from the numerous irregular accounts and disbursements growing out of the operations of the militia called into service for the suppression of Indian hostilities. Many of the accounts for that service must remain unadjusted, unless this office can be supplied with additional force.

The clerks are and will be required to give a strict observance to the duties of their respective stations; and a diligent employment of the time appropriated to public business is particularly enjoined. No one will be

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