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10. To languish with pleasure or tender. in all

ness. spest. To sounds of heav'nly harps she dies away,

And melts in visions of eternal day. Papa into 11. To vanish.

This battle fares like to the morning's Far, end it When dying clouds contend with growing lights nou

Skakspears treg.

The smaller stains and blemishes may e -ive, away and disappear, amidst the brightness the "dison.

surrounds them; but a blot of a deeper nature

casts a shade on all the other beauties, and darke bam. ens the whole character, Addison's Specials

12. [In the style of lovers.) To languish n his

with affection.

The young men acknowledged, in love-letter, -yder. that they died for Rebecca.

13. To wither, as a vegetable.

Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone; but if it dic, it bring

eth forth much fruit. -lore?

14.

To grow vapid, as liquor. !

Die. n. š. pl. dice. [, Fr. dis, Welsh] Pipe 1. A small cube, marked on its faces with cath.

numbers from one to six, which game *heir sters throw in play.

Keep a gamester from the dice, and a good

student from his book, and it is wonderful , and -hich,

I have set my life upon a cast, sease,

And I will stand the hazard of the dice. Shelt

He knows which way the lot and the dice stal

fall, as "erfectly as if they were already sent and

2. Hazard; chance.

Eftsoons his cruel hand sir Guyon staid, stin

Temp'ring the passion with advisement slow,

And must'ring might on enemy dismay'd; az'd;

, zid, cie.

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Till he he dieted to my request.

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Milk appears to be a proper diet for human He sauc'd our broth as Juno had been sick, bodies, where acrimony is to be purged or avoid- And he her dieter. Sbaksp. Cymboineed; but not where the canals are obstructed, it Diete'TICAL. c.lj. (daithsexo.) Rebeing void of all saline quality. Arbutbact.

DIETE'TICK. 'S tating to diet; belong.. Food regulated by the rules of medi

ing to the medicinal cautions about the cine, for the prevention or cure of any

use of food. disease.

He received no other counsel than to refrain I commend rather some diet for certain sea- from cold drink, which was but a dietettral causons, than frequent use of physick; for those diets tion, and such as culinary prescription might alter the body more, and trouble it less. Bacon. have afforded.

Brosun's Vul. Ers: I restrained myself to so regular a diet, as to This book of Cheyne's became the subject of eat flesh but once a-day, and a little at a time, conversation, and produced even sects in the without salt or vinegar. Temple. dietetick philosophy

Arluth. on Alinaris. 3. Allowance of provision.

To DIFFER. vin. [différo, Latin,}
For his diet, there was a continual diet giren 1. To be distinguished trom; to have
him by the king.

Jeremiaba
To Diset. v.a. [from the noun.)

properties and qualities not the same

with those of another person or thing. 1. To feed by the rules of medicine. She diets him with fasting every day,

If the pipe be a little wet on the inside, it will The swelling of his wounds to mitigate,

make a.digering sound from the same pipe dry.

Bacon. And made him pray both early and eke late.

Thy prejudices, Syphax, won't discern

Fairy Queen.
Shew a while like fearful war,

Wliat virtues grow from ignorance and choice,
To diet rank minds sick of happiness,

Nor how the hero differs from the brute.

Addison's Cato.
And parge th' obstructions which begin to stop
Our very veins of life. Sbakspeare's Henry iv.

The several parts of the same animal differ in
He was not taken well; he had not din'd:

their qualities.

Arbuthnot. The veins unfill'd, our blood is cold; and then

2. To contend; to be at variance. We post upon the morning, are unapt

A man of judgment shall sometimes hear To give or to forgive; but when we've stuf'd

ignorant men differ, and know well within him. These pipes, and these conveyances of blood,

self that those which so differ mean one thing, With wine and feeding, we have suppler souls

and yet they themselves never agree.

Bacon, Than in our priestlike fasts; therefore I'll watch

Here uncontroll'd you may in judgment sit;

We'll never differ with a crowded pir. Roroe. I will attend my husband, be his nurse,

Shakspeare.

3. To be of a contrary opinion.

In things purely speculative, as these are; and Diet his sickness; for it is my office. Sbaksp.

no ingredients of our faith, it is free to differ Henceforth my early care

from one another in our opinions and senti. Shall tend thee, and the fertile burden ease;

Burnet's Theory. Till , dieted by thee, I grow mature

There are certain measures to be kept, which In knowledge as the gods, who all things know.

may leave a tendency rather to gain than to irri.

Milton. tate those who differ with you in their sentia We have lived upon expedients, of which no

ments.

Addison's Freebolder. country had less occasion : we have dieted a heal

Others differ with me about the cruth and thy body into a consumption, by plying it with

reality of these speculations. Cheyne. Swift.

DIFFERENCE. n. s. [differentia, Latin.) 1. State of being distinct from somethingi contrariety to identity.

Where the faith of the holy church is one, a Sbaksp. Othello. difference between customs of the church doch no harm.

Hooker. 2. The quality by which one differs froin

another

This nobility, or difference from the vulgar, was not in the beginning given to the succession

of blood, but to the succession of virtue. n. s. [diet and drink.]

Raleigh, Thus, born alike, from virtue first began The dif'rence that distinguish'd man froin mans

He claim'd no title from descent of blood; or apothecary's medicines.

But that, which made him noble, made him good.

Dryden, Locke. Though it be useful to discern every variety

that to be found in nature, yet it is not convenient to consider every difference that is in things, and divide them into distinct classes under every such difference.

Locke. 3. The disproportion between one thing

and another, caused by the qualities of
each.
You shall see great difference betwixt out

Bohemia and your Sicilia. Sbaksp. Winter's Tale.

Oh the strange difference of man and man!
Dict.

To thee a woman's services are due;
My fool usurps my body. Sbaksp. King Lear.

Here might be seen a great difference between men practised to fight, and men accustomed only to spoil.

Hayward

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DIET-DRINK.

For th' equal die of war he well did know,
So both to battle fierce arranged are;

Fairy Druction
In which his harder fortune was to fall

Under my spear: such is the die of war.
Thine is th' adventure, thine the victory:
Well has thy fortune turn'd the die for the

Druis
3. Any cubick body.

Young creatures have learned spelling af words
by having them pasted upon little far tablets a

dies.
Dis. n. s. plur. dies. The stamp usedia

coinage. zond.

Such variety of dies made use of hy Woodin - to

stamping his money, makes the discovery of

counterfeits more difficult.
one? Diser. 22. s. (trom die.] One who fel.

lows the trade of dying;
clothes.

The fleece, that has been by the dier stain?

Never again its native whiteness gain'd. Was ruth

There were some of very low rank and person

fessions who acquired great estates: coktu in.

diers, and shoemakers gave public shows to lo

people. e in

DÍ'ET. 2. s. [dieta, low Latin ; diants aris

1. Food; provisions for the mouth i
victuals.

They cared for no other delicacy of fare,

curiosity of diet, than to maintain life. Rele el.

Time may come, when men
With angels may participate; and find

one who dis

have

physick instead of food.
2. To give food to.

I'm partly led to diet my revenge,
For that I do suspect the lusty Moor
Hath leapt iato my seat.
3. To board ; to supply with diet.
1. To eat by rules of physick.
2. To eat; to feed.

Ijoin with thee calm peace and quict;
Spare fast, that oft with gods doth ciet. Milton.
Medicated liquors ; drink brewed with
medicinal ingredients.

The observation will do that batter than the
lady's dict-drinks,
Diet, nis. [from dies, an appointed

day, Skinner; from diet, an old Ger-
man word signifying a multitude,
Junims.) An assembly of princes or
estates.

An emperour in title without territory, who
can ordain nothing of importance but by a diet,
or assembly of the estates of many free princes,
ecclesiastical and temporal.

Raleigh.
D'ETARY. adj. [from diet.] Pertaining

to the rules of diet.
DIETER. 2.5. [from diet.] One who

prescribes rules for eating ; one who
prepares food by medicinal rules.

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No inconvenient diet, nor too light fare.

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DIGLADIA’TION. 1. s. [digladiatio, Lat.) ture of prevalent humours, may be collected
A combat with swords; any quarrel or

from spots in our nails, we are not averse to
concede.

Brown's Vulg. Errours, contest.

Aristotle seems purposely to intend the che- To DIGRE'SS. vi n. [digressus, Latin), rishing of controversial digladiations, by his own 1. To turn aside out of the road.. atfection of an intricate obscurity. Glanville.

2. To depart from the main design of a Di'GNIFIED. adj. (from dignify.) In- discourse, or chief tenour of an argu.

vested with some dignity: it is used ment. chiefly of the clergy.

In the pursuit of an argument there is hardly Abbots are stiled dignified clerks, as having room to digress into a particular definition, as some dignity in the church. Ayliffe's Parergon. often as a man varies the signification of any DIGNIFICA’tion. B. s. (from dignity. ]

Locke. Exaltation.

3. To wander ; to expatiate. I grant that where a noble and ancient de- It seemeth (to digress no farther) that the scent and merit meet in any man, it is a double Tartarians, spreading so far, cannot be the Isdignification of that person. Walton's Angler: raelites.

Brereworden To DIGNIFY. v.a. (from dignus and 4. To go out of the right way, or comfacio, Latin.]

mon track; to transgresa; to deviate. 1. To advance ; to prefer; to exalt.

Not in use. Used chiefly of the clergy:

I am come to keep my word, 2. To honour; to adorn; to give lustre Though in some part I am forced to digress,

Which at more leisure I will so excuse
to; to improve by some adventitious
excellence, or honourable distinction.

As you shall well be satisfied. Sbaksp.
Such a day,

Thy noble shape is but a form of wax,
So fought, so follow'd, and so fairly wor,

Digressing from the valour of a man. Shaksp. Came not till now to dignify the times

DIGRE'SSION. n. s. [digressio, Latin.) Since Cæsar's fortunes! Sbaksp. Henry iv. A passage deviating from the main te.

Not that we think us worthy such a guest, nour or design of a discourse. But that your worth will dignify our feast.

The good man thought so much of his late

Ben Jonson. conceived commonwealth, that all other matters
No turbots dignify my boards ;

were but digressions to him.

Sidney. But gudgeons, founders, what my Thames af.

He, she knew, would intermix fords.

Pope. Grateful digressions, and solve high dispute Di'GNITARY. n. s. [from dignus, Latin.] With conjugal caresses.

Milton A clergyman advanced to some dignity, Here some digression I must make, t'accuse to some rank above that of a parochial Thee, my forgetful and ungrateful muse.

Denhamn priest. If there be any dignitaries, whose preferments

To content and fill the eye of the understandare perhaps not liable to the accusation of super

ing, the best authors sprinkle their works with fluity, they may be persons of superior merit.

pleasing digressions, with which they recreate the
Swift.
minds of their readers.

Dryden.
Di'GNITY. 1. s. [dignitas, Latin.)

2. Deviation, 3. Rank of elevation.

The digression of the sun is not equal; but,

near the equinoctial intersections, it is right and Angels are not any where spoken so highly of as our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, and are

greater; near the solstices more oblique and

lesser. not in dignity equal to him. Hooker. DIJUDICATION. n. s. (dijudicatio, Lat.)

Brown's Vulg. Errours: 2. Grandeur of mien; elevation of aspect.

Judicial distinction. Some men have a native dignity, which will procure them more regard by a look, than others Dike. ^.s. (dic, Saxon ; dyk, Erse.] can obtain by the most imperious commands

I. A channel to receive water.

Clarissa. The dykes are fill’d, and with a roaring sound 3. Advancement; preferment; high place.

The rising rivers float the nether ground. Dryd. Faster than spring-time show'rs comes thought,

The king of dykes! than whom no sluice of
on thought,
And not a thought but thinks on dignity. Sbaks.

With deeper sable blots the silver flood. Pope.
For those of old,

2. A mound to hinder inundations.
And these late digniiies heap'd up to them. Shaks. God, that breaks up the flood-gates of so great
4. [Among ecclesiasticks.] By a dignity

a deluge, and all the art and industry of man is we understand that promotion or pre

not sufficient to raise up dykes and ramparts ferment to which any jurisdiction is To DILA'CERATE.

against it.

Cowley. annexed. Myliffe's Parergon.

v. a. [dilacero, s. Maxims ; general principles : xugal

Latin.) To tear ; to rend; to force acai,

The infant, at the accomplished period, struge The sciences concluding from dignities, and

gling to come farth, dilacerates and breaks chose principles known by themselves, receive not sa

parts which restrained him before. Brown, Esfaction from probable reasons, much less from

DILACERA’TION. 1. s. [from dilaceratio, bare asseverations.

Brown.

Latin.]. The act of rending in two. 6. (In astrology.) The planet is in dig

The greatest sensation of pain is by the obnity when it is in any sign.

struction of the small vessels, and dilaceration of Digno’TION, n. s. [from dignosco, Lat.] the nervous fibres.

Arbutbrios Distinction ; distinguishing mark.

To DILA'NIATE. V. a. [dilanio, Latin.] That temperamental digmotions, and conjec- To tear; to rend in pieces.

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ture of prevalent humours, may be collected or

from spots in our nails, we are not averse to
concede.

Browa's Vulg. Errexts,
To DIGRE'SS. v. 1. (digressus, Latin)

1. To turn aside out of the road. dle. 2. To depart from the main design of a

discourse, or chief tenour of an argu. ed

ment.

In the pursuit of an argument there is hardly room to digress into a particular definition, as

often as a man varies the signification of any -]

Lala 3. To wander ; to expatiate.

It seemeth (to digress no farther) that the le Tartarians, spreading so far, cannot be the ks» raelites.

Brerum d 4. To go out of the right way, or com

mon track; to transgresa; to deviate. t. Not in use.

I am come to keep my word, re

Though in some part I am forced to digress,
Which at more leisure I spill so excuse
As you shall well be satisfied. Sbakia

Thy noble shape is but a form of was,
Digressing from the valour of a man. Sbak,
Digre'ssion. n. s. (digressio, Latin.)
1. A passage deviating from the main te-
nour or design of a discourse.

The good man thought so much of his late conceived commonwealth, that all other matters were but digressions to him. Siduey.

He, she knew, would intermix Grateful digressions, and solve high dispute With conjugal caresses.

Miltos. Here some digression I must make, t'accuse Thee, my forgetful and ungrateful muse

.

Derben To content and fill the eye of the understand. ing, the best authors sprinkle their works with pleasing digressions, with which they recreate the minds of their readers.

Dryden

. 2. Deviation,

The digression of the sun is not equal; but, near the equinoctial intersections, it is right agd greater; near the solstices more oblique and lesser.

Brown's Pulg. Erreari DIJUDICATION. 5. s. (dijudicalio

, Lat.} Judicial distinction. Dike. 1. so [dic, Saxon ; dyk, Erse.) 1. A channel to receive water.

The dykes are fill'd, and with a roaring sound The rising rivers float the nether ground. Dry

The king of dykes! than whom no sluice of With deeper sable blots the silver flood. Pepe. . A mound to hinder inundations.

God, that breaks up the flood-gates of so great a deluge, and all the art and industry of man is not sufficient to raise up dykes and ramparts

Coachay. 7 DILA'CERATE. v. a. [dilacere,

Rather than they would dilaniate the entralls Dilus'd, it rises in a higher spliore;
of their own mother, and expose her thereby to Diates its drops, and softens into ais. Prior
be ravished, they met half way, in a gallant I mark the various fury of the winds;
kind.

Howel's England's Tears. These neither seasons guide, for order binds: To DILA'PIDATE. vin. (dilapido, La- . They now dilate and now contract their force; tin.) To go to ruin; to fall by decay,

Various their speed, but endless is their course.

Prior. DILAPIDA'TION. n. s. [dilapidatio, Lat.)

The second refraction would spread the rays The incumbent's suffering the chancel,

one way as much as the first doth another, and io or any other edifices of his ecclesiastical dilate the image in breadth as much as the first living, to go to ruin or decay, by neg- doth in length.

Nrutora lecting to repair the same : and it like 2. To relate at large; to tell diffusely wise extends to his committing, or

and copiously. suffering to be committed, any wilful

But he would not endure that woful thoan

For to dilate at large; but urged sore, waste in or upon the glebe-woods, or

With piercing words, and pitiful implore, any other inheritance of the church.

Him hasty to arise.

Fairy Queen. Ayliffe's Parergon.

I observing, 'Tis the duty of all church-wardens to prevent Took once a pliant hour, and found good means the dilapidations of the chancel and mansion

To draw from her a prayer of earnest heart house belonging to the rector or vicar. Ayliffe, That I would all my pilgrimage dilate, DILATABI’LITY. n. s. [from dilatable.] Whereof by parcels she had something heard, The quality of admitting extension. But not distinctively.

Sbaksp. Oikelio We take notice of the wonderful diletability To DILA'te. vin. er extensiveness of the gullets of serpents: I 1. To widen ; to grow wide. have taken two adult mice out of the stomach His heart dilates and glories in his strength. of an adder, whose neck was not bigger than my

Addison,
Ray.

2. To speak largely and copiously.
By this continual contractibility and dilatibi-
lity, by different degrees of heat, the air is kept

It may be behoveful for princes, in matters in a constant motion.

of grace, to transact the same publickly, and by

Arbuthnot.
DILÁTABLE. adj. [from dilatı.] Capa-

themselves; or their ministers to dilate upon it, ble of extension.

and improve their lustre, by any addition or eloquence of speech.

Clarendon. The windpipe divides itself into a great num- DILATOR. n. s. [from dilate.) That ber of branches, called bronchia: these end in mall air bladders, dilatable and contractible, ca

which widens or extends. pable to be inflated by the admission of air, and

The buccinatores, or blowers up of the cheeks, to subside at the expulsion of it.

and the dilators of the nose, are too strong in

Arbuthnot.
Dilata'rios. n.s. (from dilatatio, Lat.] Di'LATOŘINESS. n. s. [from dilatory.]

cholerick people.

Arbutbnet. 1. The act of extending into greater space : opposed to contraction,

The quality of being dilatory; slow. The motions of the tongue, by contraction DILATORY. adj. [dilatiore, Fr. dila

ness;

sluggishness.
and dilatation, are so easy and so subtle, that you
can hardly conceive or distinguish them aright.

torius, Lat.) Tardy; slow ; given to
Holder,
procrastination

addicted to delay i 2. The state of being extended; the state in which the parts are at more distance

sluggish; loitering.

An inferior council, after former tedious suits

in a higher court, would be but dilatory, and so Joy causeth a cheerfulness and vigour in the

to little purpose.

Hayward eyes; singing, leaping, dancing, and sometimes

What wound did ever heal but by degrees? tears: all these are the effects of the dilatation,

Thou know'st we work by wit, and not by and coming forth of the spirits into the outward

witchcraft?
Bacon's Natural History.
And wit depends on dilatory time.

Shakse.
The image of the sun should be drawn out

These cardinals trifle with me; I abhor into an oblong form, either by a dilatation of

This dilatory sloth, and tricks of Rome. Sbaksa every ray, or by any other casual inequality of

Dilatory fortune plays the jilt
Neziton.

With the brave, noble, honest, gallant man,
To throw herself away on fools and knaves.

Otway. A dilatory temper commits innumerable crucks ties without design.

Addison's Spectator. Dile'ction. n. s. [dilectio, Latin.] The act of loving; kindness.

So froe is Christ's dilection, that the grand
Spesser. condition of our felicity is our belief. Boyle.

DILEMMA. η. 5. [διλημμα.]
Milten.

1. An argument equally conclusive by

contrary suppositions. A young rhetorician applied to an old sophist to be

taught the art of pleading, and barMilton.

gained for a certain reward to be paid, when he should gain a cause.

The master sued for his reward, and the Waler.

scholar endeavoured to elude his claim

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Latin.] To tear; to rend; to force in two.

The infant, at the accomplished period, struga gling to come forth, dilacerates and breaks chose parts which restrained him before. Broren. LACERAʼtion. 1. s. [from dilaceratie

, Latin.]. The act of rending in two.

The greatest sensation of pain is by the ob truction of the small vessels, and dilaceratien of he nervous fibres.

Arbutbrea DILA'NIATE. 7. a. [dilanio, Latin.] Jo tear; to rend in pieces.

the refractions.
TÓ DILA’TE. v.a. (dilato, Latin.)
1. To extend ; to spread out ; to enlarge :
opposed to contract.
But ye thereby much greater glory gate, ,
Than had ye sorted with a prince's peer;

For now your light doth more itself dilate,
And in my darkness greater doth appear.

Satan alarmid,
Collecting all his might, dilated stood,
Like Teneriff, or Aðas, unremov'd.

Opener of mine eyes,
Dim erst; dilated spirits, ampler heart,
And growing up to godhead : which for thee
Chiedy I sought; without thee can despise.

Through all the air his sounding strings dilate
Sarrow, like that which couch'd our hearts of

late,

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I

by a dilemma: If I gain my cause, I DILUCIDATION. 1.s. (from dilucidatid, shall withhold your pay, because the Latin.] The act of making clear ; judge's award will be against you; if I explanation ; exposition. lose it, I may withhold it, because I DILJENT. adj. (diluens, Latin.] Hav. shall not yet have gained a cause. On ing the power to thin and attenuate the contrary, says the master, if you other matter. gain your cause, you must pay me, be- DI'L VENT. 1. s. [from the adjective.} cause you are to pay me when you gain That which thins other matter. a cause ; if you lose it, you must pay There is no real diluent but water: every fluid me, because the judges will award it.

is diluent, as it contains vater in it. Arbuibnot, A dilemma, that Morton used to raise bene- To DILU'TE. v.a. [diluo, Latin.] volence, some called his fork, and soinc his 1. To make thin; to attenuate by the crotch.

Bacon's Henry vii. admixture of other parts. Hope, whose weak being ruin’d is

Drinking a large dose of diluted tea, as she Alike if it succeed, and if it miss ;

was ordered by a physician, she got to bed. Whom good or ill does equally confound,

Locke. And both the horns of fate's dilemma wound.

"The aliment ought to be thin to ditute, de Cowley.

mulcent to temper, or acid to subdue. Arbutb. 2. A difficult or doubtful choice; a vex- 2. To make weak. atious alternative.

The chamber was dark, lest these colours A strong dilemma in a desp'rate case !

should be diluted and weakened by the mixture To act with infamy, or quit the place. . Swift. Dilu’TE. adj. Thin; attenuated.

of any adventitious light.

Newton. A dire dilemma, either way I'm sped; I foes they write, if friends they read, me dead.

If the red and blue colours were more dilute

Pope. and weak, the distance of the images would be Di'LIGENCE. 11. s. [diligentia, Latin.)

less than an inch; and if they were more in

tense and full, that distance would be greater. Industry; assiduity; constancy in bu

Newton. siness; continuance of endeavour; un- DILU’TER. 1. s. [from dilute.] That intermitted application ; the contrary which makes any thing else thin. to idleness.

Water is the only diluter, and the best dissolDo thy diligence to come shortly unto me. vent of most of the ingredients of our aliment. 2 Timothy.

Arbuthnot on Aliments. Brethren, give diligence to make your calling DILU'TION. n. s. [dilutio, Latin.]

The and election sure.

2 Petor.

act of making any thing thin or weak. DI'LIGENT. adj. [diligens, Latin.] Opposite to dilution is coagulation or thicken1. Constant in application; persevering

ing, which is performed by dissipating the most in endeavour ; assiduous ; not idle;

liquid parts by heat, or by insinuating some sub

stances, which make the parts of the fluid conot negligent; not lazy.

here more strongly.

Arbuthnot on Aliments, Seest thou a man diligent in his business, he DILU'VIAN. adj. [from diluvium, Latin.) shall stand before kings.

Proverbs.

Relating to the deluge. 2. Constantly applied ; prosecuted with Suppose that this diluvian lake should rise to activity and perseverance; assiduous. the mountain tops in one place, and not diffuse And thie judges shall make diligent inquisition. itself equally into all countries about.

Burnet Deuteronomy. DIM. adj. [dimme, Saxon; dy, Welsh; DILIGENTLY.adv. (from diligent.] With dow, Erse.)

assiduity; with heed and perseverance; 1. Not having a quick sight; not seeing not carelessly; not idly; not negli- clearly. gently.

For her true form how can my spark discern, If you inquire not attentively and diligently, Which, dim by nature, art did never clear? you shall never be able to discern a number of

Davieso mechanical motions.

Bacon. 2. Dull of apprehension. The ancients have diligently examined in what The understanding is dim, and cannot by its consists the beauty of good postures. Dryden. natural light discover spiritual truths.

Rogers. Dill. n. s. [Dile, Saxon.] An herb, 3. Not clearly seen ; obscure ; imper

which hath a slender, fibrose, annual fectly discovered. root; the leaves are like those of fen- We might be able to aim at some dim and nel ; the seeds are oval, plain, streaked,

seeming conception, how matter might begin to

exist by the power of that eternal first Being., and bordered.

Locke. Dill is raised of seed, which is ripe in August. Something, as dim to our internal view, Mortimer. Is thus perhaps the cause of all we do.

Pope. DILU'CID. adj. [dilucidus, Latin.]

4. Obstructing the act of vision; nat lu. 1. Clear; not opaque.

minous; somewhat dark. 2. Clear; plain; not obscure.

Her face right wondrous fair did seem to be, To Dilu'cIDATE. v. a. (from dilucidare, That her broad beauty's beam great brightness Latin.) To make clear or plain ; to

threw explain; to free from obscurity.

Through the dim shade, that all men might it see. - I shall not extenuate, but explain and diluci

Spenser. date, according to the custom of the ancients:

To Dim. v. a. (from the adjective.] Brown's Vulg. Errours, 1. To cloud; to darken; to hinder from

On

gain

Thrice chang’d.

Popes

se, I DILUCIDA’TION. ... (from délucidati: - the

Latin.) The act of making clear; if I explanation ; exposition. Ese I DILUENT. adj. (diluens, Latin.) Har.

ing the power to thin and attenuate you

other matter. - be- Di’LUENT. 2. s. [from the adjective.]

That which thins other matter. - рау

There is no real diluent but water: every fuit at. is diluent, as it contains rater in it. Arbúibats bene- To DILU’TE. v.a. (diluo, Latin.] e his 1. To make thin ; to attenuate by the y VII.

admixture of other parts.

Drinking a large dose of diluted tea, as she was ordered by a physician, she got to bed

.

Lacko nd. The aliment ought to be thin to dilute

, der wlsy.

mulcent to temper, or acid to subdue. Arbuto vex, 2. To make weak.

The chamber was dark, lest these colours

should ise diluted and weakened by the mixture wift. of any adventitious light.

Nratu, DILU'TE. adj. Thin; attenuated. lead.

If the red and blue colours were more bilate and weak, the distance of the images would be

less than an inch; and if they were more in in.)

tense and full, that distance would be greater. bu

Neatients un. Dil U'TER. 1. s. [from dilute.] That ary which makes any thing else thin.

Water is the only diluter, and the best dissala vent of most of the ingredients of our aliment.

Arbutbrot en Aliauto ling DILU’TION. n. s. [dilutis, Latin.) The

act of making any thing thin or weak.

Opposite to dilution is coagulation or thickering, which is performed by dissipating the most liquid parts by heat, or by insinuating some sebe stances, which make the parts of the fiuid cohere more strongly.

Årbutbngt en Alsace he Dilu’vian. adj. [from diluvium, Latin.) rbs.

Relating to the deluge. ith

Suppose that this diluvian lake should rise t the mountain tops in one place, and not difere

itself equally into all countries about. Buret 9. DIM. adj. [dimme, Saxon ; dy, Welsb; th

dow, Erse.]

1. Not having a quick sight; i. clearly.

For her true form how can my spark dişcerta Which, dim by nature, art did never clear? 2. Dull of apprehension.

The understanding is dim, and cannot by its natural light discover spiritual truths. Regeri 3.

a full perception of light, and free ex. What judgment I had, increases rather than

diminishes; and thoughts, such as they are, come ercise of vision.

crowding in so fast upon me, that my only difAs where the Almighty's lightning brand does

ficulty is to chuse or to reject. Dryden. light,

Crete's ample fields diminish to our eye; k dias the dazed eyen, and daunts the senses

Before the Boreal blasts the vessels fly. Pope quite.

Spenser's Fairy Queen. k hath been observed by the ancients, that DIMI'NISHINGLY. adv. (from diminish.] much use of Venus doth dion the sight; and yet In a manner tending to vilify, or leseunuchs, which are unable to generate, are ne- sen. vertheless also dim sighted.

Bacon. I never heard him censure, or so much as Every one declares against blindness, and yet

speak dirinishingly of any one that was absent. who almost is not fond of that which dims his

Locke. sight?

Locke. DIMINUTION. n. 5. (diminutio, Latin.]
For thee I dim these eyes, and stuff this head,
With all such reading as was never read. Popes

1. The act of making less : opposed to 2. To make less bright; to obscure.

augmentation. A ship that through the ocean wide,

The one is not capable of any diminution or By conduct of some star, doth make her way,

augmentation at all by men; the other apt to admit both.

Hooker. When as a storm hath dim'd her trusty guide, 2. The state of growing less : opposed to Out of her course doth wander iar astray.

Spenser.

increase. All of us have cause

The gravitating power of the sun is transTo wail the dimming of our shining star. Sbaksp. mitted through the vast bodies of the planets Thus while he spake, each passion dimm'd his without any diminution, so as to act upon all face,

their parts, to their very centres, with the same

Miltor. force, and according to the same laws, as if the The principal figure in a picture is like a king part upon which it acts were not surrounded among his courtiers, who dims all his attendants. with the body of the planet.

Newton. Dryden.

Finite and infinite seem to be looked upon DIMENSION. n. s. [dimensio, Latin.]

as the modes of quantity, and to be attributed Space contained in any thing ; bulk;

primarily to those things which are capable of extent ; capacity. It is seldom used

increase or diminution.

Locke. but in the plural. The three dimen

3. Discredit ; loss of dignity; degradasions are length, breadth, and depth.

tion.
He tried

Gladly to the
The tomb, and found the straight dimensions

Heroick laureld Eugene yields the prime; wide.

Nor thinks it diminution to be rank'd

Dryden.
My gentleman was measuring my walls, and 4. Deprivation of dignity ; injury of re-

In military honour next.

Pbilips taking the dimensions of the room.

Swift.
DIME'NSIONLESS. adj. (from dimension.]

putation.
Without any definite bulk.

Make me wise by thy truth, for my own soul's

salvation, and I shall not regard the world's Dimensionless through heav'nly doors. Milton.

opinion or diminution of me. King Charles, Diue'nsive, adj. (dimensus. Lat.] That

They might raise the reputation of another, marks the boundaries or outlines.

though they are a diminution to his. Addisoz. All bodies have their measure, and their space;

5. [In architecture.) The contraction But who can draw the soul's dimensive lines?

of the diameter of a column, as it

ascends.

Davies. battle ; the act of fighting; contest,

Small; little; narrow; contracted,

The poor wren,
Dict.

The most diminutive of birds, will fight,
The act of halving ; division into two
(dimidiatio, Latin.]
Her young ones in her nest, against the owl.

Sbaksp. Macbeth.
Dict. It is the interest of mankind, in order to the

advance of knowledge, to be sensible they have 1. To make less by abscission or destruc

yet attained it but in poor and diminutive mea. tion of any part; the opposite to ir

Glanville's Scepsis. The light of man's understanding is but a short, diminutive, contracted light, and looks not beyond the present.

South. Locke, If the ladies should once take a liking to such

a diminutive race of lovers, we should, in a little time, see mankind epitomized, and the whole species in miniature.

Addison. 3. To take any thing from that to which

Milton. They know how weak and aukward many of

those little diminutive discourses are. Watts. DIMI'NUTIVE. n. s. [from the adjective.) 1. A word formed to express littleness :

as lapillus, in Latin, a little stone ; mai. sonette, in French, a little house; -maniken, in English, a little man.

He afterwards proving a dainty and effeminate youth, was commonly called, by the diminutive of his name, Peterkin or Perkin. Bacon.

ing

Je;

In they passid

on.

DecatION. 9. , [dimicatio, Lat.) Dimi'N UTIVE. adj. (diminutivus, Latin.]

not seeing

DIMIDIA'TION. n. s.

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Not clearly seen; obscure ; imperfectly discovered.

We might be able to aim at some dis and seeming conception, how matter might begin sa exist by the power of that eternal first Being.

Something, as dim to our internal view, thus perhaps the cause of all we do. Potem 4. Obstructing the act of vision; not luminous; somewbat dark.

Her face right wondrous fair did seem to beg That her broad beauty's beam great brightness

threw Through the dim shade, that all men might it see

Spencer To Dim. v. a. (from the adjective.] 1. To cloud; to darken; to hinder from

That we call good which is apt to cause or in

crease pleasure, or diminisb pain in us.
2. To impair; to lessen ; to degrade.

Impiously they thought
Thee to diminish, and from thee withdraw
The number of thy worshippers.
it belongs : the contrary to add.
Nothing was diminished from the safety of the
king by the imprisonment of the duke. Hayw.
Ye shall not add unto the word which I com-
mand you, nęither shall you diminisb

aught from

Deuteronomy.
LO DIMI'NISH. V, 11. To grow less; to

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