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~' Magazine

V l . II.
3:12: ,_ PHILADELPHIA, SEPTEMBER, 1910. ,smmcopy

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Published monthly, except july and August, by McKinley Publishing Co., Philadelphia, Pa.

Copyright, 1910, McKinley Publishing Co.
Entered as second-class matter, October 26, 1909, m the Post-office at Philadelphia, Pa., u der Act of March 3, 1879.

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XACT references to some fifteen hundred of

the most useful and accessible works on English History will be found in this book.

" \Vith these it is possible for anyone to make the most of the library facilities at hand, or for the instructor to direct the collateral reading of his students with the maximum amount of efficiency, and the minimum amount of personal attention.

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Lewis’s Pupil’s Notebook an? Study Outline in Oriental and Greek History

McKinley’s Pupil’s Notebook an? Study Outline in Roman History

PRICE, 25 CENTS EACH

IIESE books help the pupil to understand the relations

between cause and result and to distin uish the landmarks

of history from the minor details iEl‘hey thus combine the topical and library methods of studying history. They are meant to train the pupil to co-ordinate and subordinate properly the various events, and also to insure a stated amount of thought and work in each day’s assignment. Each Study Outline is a skeleton of topics, with indications of subdivisions, and blank spaces in which the student may Write the sub topics and other brief notes to complete the outline. S see is left for numerous drawings and plans which he can readily make after consulting the books referred to. Fourteen outline maps are provided to be filled in with the eswntial geographical data. Many Special Topics are suggested for collateral reading, with copious page and chapter references to important books.

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You will furor adrcrtixcrs and publishm‘s by n

wulioniny this nuuluzinc in answering advertisements.

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CQNTENTS.

A History Time Chart, by E. Baucs-l'bnnss'r .......... 3

Introductory Courses at University of Wisconsin, by WAYLAND J. CHASE ............................

Preparation of the High School Teacher of History, by HAVEN W. Enwnnus ............................

June Examination Papers in History ................ 10 History in the Grades—Indian Treaties 11 and 17 History in the Secondary Schools: 13

“ Geographical Basis of American History," by ARTHUR M. WOLFSON: “Why We in America Study English History," by AnTnUn M. \VOLFSON; “The Fall of the 01d Roman Empire,” by D. C. KNOWLTON; “ The First Week in the Ancient History Class," by D. C. KNOWLTON.

Teaching of Recent History, by JOHN HAYNES ........ 18 Making History for History Teachers, by W. H. ALLEN 18 Periodical Literature, by HsNaY L. CANN0N .......... 19 Book Reviews: 20

Elliott’s “Biographical Story of the Constitution”; Abbott’s “Society and Politics in Ancient Rome ”; Forman‘s “History of the United States.”

Reports from the Historical Field. 22 \VAL'I'ER H. CusnlNd, Editor.

List of History Associations; Announcements; Notes and Personals; the N. E. A. Meeting; Indiana Association; the California Association.

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The History Teacher’s Magazine

Managing Editor, ALBERT E. MCKINLEY, Pn.D.

ASSOCIATE EDITORS PROF. Aa'rni's C. HOWLAND, University of Pennsylvania. PROF. FRED Mormow FLiNo, University of Nebraska. PROF. NORMAN M. 'lhn-zNHOLME, University of Iiiissotu‘i. PROF. HENRY L. CANNON. Leland Stanford, Jr., University.

DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS History and Civics in Secondary Schools: Aa'rnun M. Won-“son, Ph.D., DeWitt Clinton High School. New York. DANIEL C. KNOWLTON. Ph.D., Barringer High School, Newark, N. J. WILLIAM FAIRLEY. Ph.D., Commercial High School, Brooklyn, N. Y. C. B. NEWTON, Lawrenccville School. New Jersey. Amen-r H. SANFORD, State Normal School, La Cross, Wis. Current History: JonN HAYNES. Ph.D.. l)orchester High School, Boston. Reports from the Historical Field: \VALTER. ll. (‘nsnrNtL Secretary New England History Teachers’ Association. South Framingham. Mass. History in the Grades: ARMAND J. fiEBSON. Ph.l).. Robert Morris Public School, Philadelphia. SARAH A. DYNES. State Normal School, Trenton. N. J. LIDA Inn-z TALL, Supervisor of Grammar Grades, Baltimore, Md. CORRESPONDING EDITORS. HENRY JOHNSON, Teachers’ College, Columbia Univ., N. Y. Mnmti. HILL, Normal School, Lowell. Mass. II. W. EDWARDS, High School, Oakland, Ckil. \VALTER L. FLEMING. Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge. MARY SNANNON SMITH. Meredith College. Raleigh, N. C. MARY LOUISE CHILDS, High School, Evanston. Ill. E. Bauer; FORREST. London. England. JAMES F. WILLARD, University of Colorado. Boulder. Ool.

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PHILADELPHIA, SEPTEMBER, 1910.

$1.00 a year X5 cents a copy

The Use @li a History We @lherrt

BY E. BRUCE-FORREST, M.A., WILLIAM ELLIS SCHOOL, LONDON.

History deals with events in the categories of time and place.

For the representation of place relations we have an invaluable instrument in the map. If history in a sense “ bodies forth the form of things unknown,” geography and the map give them “ a local habitation.” But it is necessary to add that the above statement does not mean that the history teacher can feel any satisfaction with the present supply of maps for his work. In England, at any rate, there is serious cause for complaint. '

Apart from the facts that no solution has been found of the problem of adequately combining a representation of physical and historical phenomena and that the supply of wall maps is so scanty, one has to conunent especially on the narrow limitation in the TYPE of map produced. In respect of history there is no parallel to the remarkable progress of our generation in geographical cartography.

This is natural, perhaps. The graphic representation of present-day conditions has a practical utility which cannot be claimed for the past. The data for our own day are, moreover, far more complete and relia

ble. Still the disparity is too great. For Upper edge N

perpendicular lines into sections of equal size. Each represents a century, and in this way twenty-four centuries are depicted, from 500 3.0. to A1). 1900. Ionditions of space in this particular room prevent an earlier date for the beginning of the chart. For to narrow down the century divisions would take much away from the teaching value of the chart. They should be as large as possible, since boldness and clearness are essential. Figures denoting the particular century to which it applies are painted clearly at the head of each section.

A groove has been cut in the wooden moulding, which forms the lower edge of the chart. This is to allow of the insertion of tin sockets, which contain large cardboard tablets (Fig. 2). On each of these is printed in Roman type (Fig. 3) the date and title of one of the most important events in the century to which it refers. These sockets are not fixed perpendicularly, but are inclined so that the printing and date can be read from a greater distance. The tablets can at any time be easily removed from the tin holders if it is desired to alter the selection of dates. Maps have

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example, in one of the best-known of English school historical atlases, out of 70 maps, exelusive of battle plans, there are only two which are not purely political or military. The proportion is not; much different in the scholarly works, although one may find scattered about in various books occasional maps of another type, e. g., representing “ En

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closures in England in the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries ” or the “ Distribution of Wealth in England” at different dates. Thus any teacher of history who compares with this situation the wonderful quantity and variety of map forms, and of diagrams and of graphs in such a work as, to quote one example, Bartholomew’s “ Atlas of the World’s Commerce,” must feel that. his subject is a little behind the times. Some of those map forms, e. g., Isochronic Distance Charts, could with great value be adapted to history teaching.

Yet it is a far more difiicult matter to devise a satisfactory method for the visualization of time relations and conceptions. But there are devices, and we must use, experiment with. and improve them.

There are two forms of time charts in use in the room which I have fitted up at the William Ellis School, especially for the teaching of history.

WALL TIME CHART (Fig. 1). Running round two of the walls of the room is a light frame, made of thin boards, papered in white, sized and varnished. It is about two feet in depth, and the lower edge is about four and one-half feet from the ground. The frame is divided by-narrow black

Grooved lower edge fibril 43 ft from ground

been hung upon the century divisions to represent some typical territorial distribution during the century in question. Above the chart the two walls mentioned have been practically covered with framed copies of authentic portraits, pictures of buildings, ships and other characteristic products of the time represented. For example, the portraits begin with the well-known bust of Pericles in the British Museum in London and end with pictures of Bismarck and Gladstone; the buildings range from the great temple at Paestum to the London Ilouses of Parliament, rebuilt in the nineteenth century; the ships start with a photograph of the cast of a trireme, in the British Museum, and end with a picture of H.M.S. Dreadnought.

Altogether there are close upon 200 framed subjects, including a series upon a third wall of the room, which is confined to local history, i. e., London. The pictures are, of course, so hung that they lie above that section of the Time Chart appropriated to the age to which they belong. Thus the sequence of time is represented horizontally and a particular age perpendicularly in a sort of panel, starting from

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