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ODES, DESCRIPTIVE AND ALLEGORICAL.

ODE TO PITY.

1 0 Thou, the friend of man assign’d,
With balmy hands his wounds to bind,

And charm his frantic woe :
When first Distress, with dagger keen,
Broke forth to waste his destined scene,

His wild unsated foe!

2 By Pella's Bard, a magic name,
By all the griefs his thought could frame,

Receive my humble rite:
Long, Pity, let the nations view
Thy sky-worn robes of tenderest blue,
And

eyes of dewy light!

3 But wherefore need I wander wide
To old Ilissus' distant side,

Deserted stream, and mute ?
Wild Arun 2 too has heard thy strains,
And Echo, 'midst my native plains,

Been soothed by Pity's lute. 1. Pella's Bard : ' Euripides.—2 « Arun :' a river in Sussex, near the birthplace of Otway.

4 There first the wren thy myrtles shed
On gentlest Otway's infant head,

To him thy cell was shown ;
And while he sung the female heart,
With youth's soft notes unspoil'd by art,

Thy turtles mix'd their own.

5 Come, Pity, come, by Fancy's aid, Even now my thoughts, relenting maid

Thy temple's pride design :
Its southern site, its truth complete,
Shall raise a wild enthusiast heat,

In all who view the shrine. .

6 There Picture's toil shall well relate,
How chance, or hard involving fate,

O'er mortal bliss prevail :
The buskin’d Muse shall near her stand,
And sighing prompt her tender hand,

With each disastrous tale.

7 There let me oft, retired by day,
In dreams of passion melt away,

Allow'd with thee to dwell :
There waste the mournful lamp of night,
Till, Virgin, thou again delight

To hear a British shell !

G

ODES, DESCRIPTIVE AND ALLEGORICAL.

ODE TO PITY.

1 0 thou, the friend of man assign’d,
With balmy hands his wounds to bind,

And charm his frantic woe :
When first Distress, with dagger keen,
Broke forth to waste his destined scene,

His wild unsated foe!

2 By Pella’s Bard, a magic name,
By all the griefs his thought could frame,

Receive my humble rite:
Long, Pity, let the nations view
Thy sky-worn robes of tenderest blue,

And eyes of dewy light !

3 But wherefore need I wander wide
To old Ilissus' distant side,

Deserted stream, and mute ?
Wild Arun 2 too has heard thy strains,
And Echo, ʼmidst my native plains,

Been soothed by Pity's lute. 1. Pella's Bard : ' Euripides.—2 « Arun :' a river in Sussex, near the place of Otway.

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ODE TO FEAR.

Trular oder

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THOU, to whom the world unknown
With all its shadowy shapes is shown ;
Who seest appallid th' unreal scene,
While Fancy lifts the veil between :

Ah, Fear! ah, frantic Fear!
I
see,

I see thee near.
I know thy hurried step, thy haggard eye!
Like thee I start, like thee disorder'd fly.
For, lo, what monsters in thy train appear!
Danger, whose limbs of giant mould
What mortal eye can fix'd behold ?
Who stalks his round, a hideous form,
Howling amidst the midnight storm ;
Or throws him on the ridgy steep
Of some loose hanging rock to sleep :
And with him thousand phantoms join'd,
Who prompt to deeds accursed the mind :
And those, the fiends, who, near allied,
O'er Nature's wounds and wrecks preside ;
While Vengeance, in the lurid air,
Lifts her red arm, exposed and bare :
On whom that ravening brood 1 of Fate,
Who lap the blood of Sorrow, wait :
Who, Fear, this ghastly train can see,
And look not madly wild, like thee?

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EPODE.

In earliest Greece, to thee, with partial choice,

The grief-full Muse address'd her infant tongue :
The maids and matrons, on her awful voice,

Silent and pale, in wild amazement hung.
1. That ravening brood :' the Furies of Sophocles. See · Electra.'

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