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SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSENGER,

DEVOTED TO

EVERY DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE

AND

THE FINE ARTS.

Au gré de nos desirs bien plus qu'au grés des vents.
Crebillon's Electre.

As we will, and not as the winds will.

VOL. XXIII.

NEW SERIES, VOL. II.

JULY TO DECEMBER-1856.

JOHN R. THOMPSON, EDITOR.

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA.

MACFARLANE, FERGUSSON & CO., PROPRIETORS.

LIST OF CONTENTS.

1. GOV. WISE'S ORATION, AT LEXINGTON, 4TH JULY, 1856,

2. TO ZENOVA. SELECTED FROM THE POEMS OF THE LATE HENRY ELLEN,
3. MR. BLEDSOE'S REVIEW OF HIS REVIEWER,

4. LANGUAGE MEPOПION ANOPQПION. BY REV. RUFUS W. BAILEY,
PROFESSOR OF LANGUAGES IN AUSTIN COLLEGE, TEXAS,
5. TO MY COUSIN NANNIE. BY A. F. HARVEY,

6. VIRGINIA GIRLS AND GALLANTS FOUR SCORE YEARS AGO.
By J. E. C.

7. A PASTORAL HYMN TO THE FAIRIES.

8. KANAWHA PIECES.

BY T. B. ALDRICH,
BY AN OLD MAN OF KANAWHA.

No. V. THE DISAPPOINTED BRIDEGROOM.

No. VI.-A SCREECH,

9. THE HEART SACRIFICE,

10. BANNAKER, THE BLACK ASTRONOMER,

11. SULLY'S FOREST DAYS: HIS RECOLLECTIONS AND HIS DREAMS, 12. THE PAINTER AND HIS PUPIL.* A FLEMISH STORY,

13. EDITOR'S TABLE:

W. Gilmore Simms-The Original of "Not a Drum was Heard," 14. NOTICES OF NEW WORKS:

Rachel and the New World-The Youth of the Old Dominion-Poems
of Herrick, &c.

*From Chamber's Journal.

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TERMS.-A quarter of a page, one insertion,

A quarter of a page, one year,
Half page, one insertion,
Half page, one year,
One page, one insertion,
One page, one year,

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55

65

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TO ADVERTISERS.

For the convenience of the public, we shall publish an advertisement sheet with each number of this work, where advertisers will find it to their interest to insert their advertisements. Every issue of an advertisement, will be equal to twenty-five hundred circulars distributed.

$150
12 00

2.50
20 00

4.00 35 00

MACFARLANE, FERGUSSON & CO., Proprietors.

SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSENGER.

A MAGAZINE DEVOTED TO LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND ART.

RICHMOND, JULY, 1856.

GOV. WISE'S ORATION,

AT LEXINGTON, VA., 4TH JULY, 1856.

Fellow-Citizens, and Gentlemen,

Professors and Cadets of the

Virginia Military Institute. We come up to perform the duty of placing on its pedestal a copy in solid bronze of Houdon's marble statue of George Washington, which the Commonwealth has dedicated to her Military Institute.

As Virginia's Chief Magistrate, here in this beautiful mountain place, called by a name which reverberates the reports of the first guns of the Revolution; this day of Independence, a political Sabbath fit for the solemn rites-I devoutly inaugurate this ceremony of pious patriotism.

We come not either to bury or to praise a Cæsar:-we come not like Romans to solemnize the apotheosis of an Emperor, or the canonization of a Saint; but as Christians, as citizens of the United States; as more than citizens--as children of the family of the State where he was born and is buried; as sons and daughters of the Liberty his valor and wisdom won: to bow reverently before the Virtue which hallows and embalms the memory of our country's Father! Virginia was not unmindful of the grateful duty of transmitting to posterity the personal image of the greatest and best of her sons. Her Legislature resolved as early as 1784 that her Executive should be charged with the trust of procuring "a statue of Gen. Washington, of the finest marble and best workman

VOL. XXIII.-1

ship, with an inscription on its pedestal in these words:

"The General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Virginia have caused this statue to be erected as a monument of affection and gratitude to George Washington, who, uniting to the endowments of the hero the virtues of the patriot, and exerting both in establishing the liberties of his country, has rendered his name dear to his fellow-citizens, and given the world an immortal example of true glory."

This inscription, which we are told was written by James Madison, is as simple in its language as it is sublime in its sentiment, It was to be a monument of

affection and gratitude," erected-not to the man-but to the "endowments of the hero;" and not to the qualities alone, but to their 'exertion' also-the labors, the action "in establishing the liberties of his country" and rendering his name-not immortal, not famous even, but-" dear to his fellow-citizens." That which it speaks of as "immortal" is not the man nor his name, but "the example of true glory" which he had given the world ;—that, that alone true piety and good taste could dare to call "immortal!"

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The Governor, Ben: Harrison, selected the two fittest agents, Thomas Jefferson and Benj. Franklin, then in Paris, to employ the best artist in Europe and to ornament the monument with proper and fit devices and emblems. The eminent

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