Слике страница
PDF
ePub

and twelve and one-half (12 1-2) cents for children over six and under twelve years of age.

This order to remain in effect until the further orders of this Commission.

The above order is not intended to prevent the Charleston-Isle of Palms Traction Company from issuing commutation tickets to any of its patrons.

By order of the Commission.

FRANK W. SHEALY, (Seal)

Chairman; H. H. ARNOLD,

Commissioners. J. P. DARBY, Secretary.

Columbia, S. C., October 21, 1920.

ORDER NO. 221.

In the Matter of Increased Passenger Fares and Charges. Pickens

Railroad Company.

Pickens Railroad Company:

The Commission in regular session today considered petition of Pickens Railroad Company, filed in this office August 21, 1920, for increased passenger rates.

The Commission has gone into the figures submitted by the Pickens Railroad Company, which were not sworn to but which the Commission will accept as correct unless question arises, and notices the deficit that is being maintained by said railroad. The Commission realizes full well that if the Pickens Railroad is to continue in operation as a common carrier, so far as passenger service is concerned, it will under present conditions have to have relief, and in the opinion of the Commission the only way this can be done is to authorize an increase in passenger rates as provided in law passed at the 1920 session of the General Assembly. Therefore,

IT IS ORDERED, That on and after November 1, 1920, the legal rate to be charged for transportation of passengers over the Pickens Railroad shall be five (5) cents per mile for adult passengers, and two and one-half (2 1-2) cents per mile for children over six and under twelve

years

of
age,

with a minimum of

ten (10) cents for adult passengers and five (5) cents for children over six and under twelve years of age.

This order to remain in effect until the further orders of the Commission. By order of the Commission.

FRANK W. SHEALY, (Seal)

Chairman. J. P. DARBY, Secretary.

Columbia, S. C., October 21, 1920.

ORDER NO. 222.

In the Matter of Increased Passenger Fares and Charges. Orange

burg Railway. Orangeburg Railway, Mr. C. E. Denniston, Receiver:

Following up Commission's checking of books of Orangeburg Railway on October 15, 1920, the Commission is fully convinced that if said railway is to exist and perform the functions of a common carrier an increase in passenger rates over rate now in effect (3c) is absolutely necessary, and acting in accordance with the law passed by the last General Assembly applicable to railroad under twenty-five miles in length, the Commission this day issues the following order:

IT IS ORDERED, That on and after November 1, 1920, the legal rate to be charged by the Orangeburg Railway for the transportation of passengers from one station to another on said railway, shall be five (5) cents per mile for adult passengers, and two and one-half (2 1-2) cents per mile for children over six and under twelve years of age; with a minimum of ten (10) cents for adult passengers and five (5) cents for children over six and under twelve years of age.

IT IS FURTHER ORDERED, That where a fraction of a mile exists between stations fares shall be computed on full mileage basis, using fare to the next whole mile.

This order to remain in effect until further orders of the Commission. By order of the Commission.

FRANK W. SHEALY, (Seal)

Chairman; J. P. DARBY, Secretary.

Columbia, S. C., October 21, 1920.

ORDER NO. 223.

In the Matter of Schedule of Passenger Trains Between Lucknow

and Bishopville, S. C., Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Co. Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company:

As per appointment previously made by the Commisison, a hearing was held by the Commission at Bishopville, S. C., on September 23, 1920, in regard to schedule of passenger trains between Lucknow and Bishopville on the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad. At this hearing a number of people were present, and while the meeting was purely informal, still the Commission obtained a vast amount of information from those present. From the information received the Commission is unable to see where the present schedule works a hardship on any place or person served by this sixteen miles of railroad. Good connections are made at Elliott, the trains arrive and leave Bishopville at the same time as heretofore, the train crew, lies over for the night at Bishopville, as has been the custom in the past, and, in the opinion of the Commission, the present schedule, while it does not inconfrom their freight trains and out of the way of the freight service and convenience that did not exist before it was put into effect. It has always been this Commission's desire to render the greatest amount of service to the greatest number, and as the present arrangement does not entail a great deal of additional cost to the railroad and at the same time gives them some advantage in the way of keeping their passenger trains separate from their freight trains and out of the way of the freight service, as well as convenience in the way of mail, express and passenger service for quite a number of citizens that would not otherwise be enjoyed, the Commission is convinced that for the present at least the schedule should remain in effect. Therefore, in view of the above facts.

IT IS ORDERED, That the schedule now in effect on the Elliott-Lucknow branch of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad continue in effect until the further orders of this Commission. By order of the Commission.

FRANK W. SHEALY, (Seal)

Chairman; J. P. DARBY, Secretary.

Columbia, S. C., November 19, 1920.

ORDER NO. 224.

In the Matter of Complaint of Mrs. Nannie J. E. Foster Against

Southern Railway Company for Lack of Grade Crossing Facilities Over Track of Southern Railway Company About Two

and One-half Miles North of Union, S. C. Southern Railway Company:

This matter was called to the attention of the Railroad Commission of South Carolina on June 22, 1920. À continuous correspondence was maintained between the Commission, the complainant, Southern Railway Co., and others directly or indirectly interested, until October 23, 1920, at which time the Commission decided that in order to obtain information that in its opinion was necessary to arrive at a proper conclusion in regard to the matter complained of a hearing should be held in its office at Columbia, S. C., on Thursday, November 4, 1920, at 3 p. m. The complainant, Mrs. Nannie J. E. Foster; A. Barnado, representatives of Southern Railway Company, and others interested, were notified of said hearing and requested to be present. The hearing was held according to announcement and all parties to the controversy hereinbefore mentioned were present. The Southern Railway Co. was represented by Mr. H. E. DePass, Attorney, Mr. Wm. Maxwell, Superintendent, and Mr. Kittles, Civil Engineer. At this hearing, which was strictly formal, all witnesses appearing were sworn, and the testimony was taken by a stenographer.

The testimony shows that for a number of years a crossing from the public highway over tracks of Southern Railway Co. to the property in question has been in existence about opposite the residence in which A. Barnado now resides. This crossing served as an outlet to the property which he and his sister, Mrs. Nannie J. E. Foster, inherited from their uncle. This crossing was used by Mrs. Nannie J. E. Foster, who for a long number of years lived in a little house south of that now occupied by A. Barnado, and was a crossing for the Harris family to their plantation, as well as for the public in general. It further developed at the hearing that this property which Mrs. Nannie J. E. Foster and her brother, A. Barnado, inherited from their uncle was partitioned in kind among the two aforesaid mentioned parties under an order of the Court, the northern end of the property, consisting of about 47 1-2 acres, being set off and awarded to Mrs. Nannie J. E. Foster, and

the southern half on which the residence is located, consisting of about 47 1-2 acres, was set off and awarded to A. Barnado. Both of these parties have gone into possession of their respective tracts, and within the last few years Mrs. Nannie J. E. Foster has built a new residence on the property so awarded to her. It is admitted that the true location of the property of Mrs. Nannie J. E. Foster, A. Barnado, the main line of the Southern Railway, and the county highway are all correctly set forth in a blue print of said property, of date June 24th, 1919, as made by the resident engineer of Southern Railway Company, which was introduced in evidence and marked "Exhibit A”, and is now on file in the records in the office of the Railroad Commission of South Carolina.

Until about one year ago Mrs. Nannie J. E. Foster, in going from her home, reached the county highway by traveling along the railroad until she reached the crossing opposite the house of A. Barnado, aforesaid, and thence across the railroad to said public highway. About a year ago the hereinbefore mentioned A. Barnado plowed up this road, which the said Mrs. Nannie J. E. Foster had been traveling, from his property line down to the public crossing before referred to and shown on said plat, covering a distance of approximately 280 feet on the right-of-way of the railroad adjoining the tract of land hereinbefore stated as being assigned to A. Barnado. In order to stop his sister from using this road and crossing he erected and stretched a wire fence on his property line between hers and his property, and down and along the right-of-way of the Southern Railway, whereby the said Mrs. Nannie J. E. Foster has been shut in and has no outlet across the tracks of the Southern Railway Company to the public highway. The testimony further shows that ever since the said A. Barnado has shut his sister off from access to the crossing opposite his house she has been compelled to leave her vehicles and farm implements on the other side of the railroad from her residence, adjoining the highway, exposed to the weather, and has suffered inconvenience by having to carry heavy loads by hand across the tracks, and has suffered further inconvenience and damage to live stock and property.

The said A. Barnado contended that the crossing opposite his house, which has been in use for a long number of years, as stated hereinbefore, is a private crossing, but he admitted that he had no agreement with the railroad company to that effect, nor did

« ПретходнаНастави »