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DESTROYER OILING, VIEW FROM DECK OF FUEL VESSEL.

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DESTROYER ALONGSIDE OILING—VIEW FROM BRIDGE OF FUEL Vessel.

vessel that had never previously gone through the operation. With practice, a destroyer could no doubt connect up in 10 minutes.

In rough sea the fuel vessel makes a lea, taking sea a little forward of beam. In smooth weather a destroyer can be taken on each side while steaming 8 to 10 knots, one vessel connecting up while the other is having oil delivered. When towing abreast, both vessels are entirely and instantly under full control of their engines and helm. Lines can be cast adrift without danger of fouling screws. The whole operation can be viewed by the captain from the bridge of each vessel, and the two vessels are in direct verbal communication all of the time that they are close to each other. In towing astern or from the quarter, this is not the case, and unless the officer in control of either vessel can see fully what the other is doing, difficulties are likely to be presented.

With fuel vessels thus arranged as mentioned above, a fleet can maintain the sea indefinitely. Fueling cannot be attempted in very rough weather, but a fairly smooth sea can usually be found in the course of several days, except in specially tempestuous waters.

The method employed with destroyers can be used for much larger vessels, though perhaps it could not be done in as rough a sea.

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SECRETARY'S NOTES

Change in Board

of Control

Captain David Potter PC., U. S. Navy, tendered his resignation as a member of the Board of Control, and his resignation was accepted by the Board with regret on

August 12, 1919.

Life, regular and associate membership, 5652. Membership New members: 7. Resignations: 27. Dropped:

9. Deaths: (15)
Lieut. Commander R. O. Baush, U. S. N.
Lieut. Commander Richard M. Elliot, U. S. N.
Lieut. F. D. Blakely, U. S. N.
Midshipman R. G. Campbell, Jr., U. S. N.
Lieut. T. T. Bower, U. S. N.
Ensign S. S. Cutler, U. S. N.
Lieut. J. S. Spaven, U. S. N.
Lieut. J. W. Gale, U. S. N. R. F.
Ensign W. E. Bingham, U. S. N. R. F.
Lieut. Theodore Andersen, U. S. N.
Captain R. C. Bulmer, U. S. N.
Commander F. R. King, U. S. N.
Lieut. W. F. McWhirk, U. S. N.
Major E. A. Perkins, U. S. M. C.
Commodore C. G. Bowman, U. S. N.

The annual dues ($2.50) for the year 1919 are now Dues payable.

Regular and associate members of the U. S. Naval Institute are subject to the payment of the annual dues until the date of the receipt of their resignation.

All members are urged to keep the Secretary and Address Treasurer informed of the address to which PRO

of CEEDINGS are to be sent, and thus insure their receipt. Members Members and subscribers are urged to notify the

Secretary and Treasurer promptly of the non-receipt of PROCEEDINGS, in order that tracers may be started. The issue is completed by the 15th of each month.

The Institute Book Department will supply any Book obtainable book, of any kind, at retail price, postDepartment age prepaid. The trouble saved the purchaser

through having one source of supply for all books, should be considered. The cost will not be greater and sometimes less than when obtained from dealers.

The attention of authors of articles is called to Reprints of the fact that the cost to them of reprints other Articles than the usual number furnished, can be greatly

reduced if the reprints are struck off while the article is in press. They are requested to notify the Secretary and Treasurer of the number of reprints desired when the article is submitted. Twenty copies of reprints are furnished authors free of charge.

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Authors of articles submitted are urged to furIllustrations nish with their manuscript any illustrations they

may have in their possession for such articles. The Institute will gladly co-operate in obtaining such illustrations as may be suggested by authors.

Original photographs of objects and events which may be of interest to our readers are also desired, and members who have opportunities to obtain such photographs are requested to secure them for the Institute.

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Whole Nos. 6, 7, 10, 13, 14, 15, 17, 145, 146, 147, Notice 149, and 179 of the PROCEEDINGS are exhausted ;

there are so many calls for single copies of these numbers that the Institute offers to pay for copies thereof returned in good condition at the rate of 75 cents per copy.

ANNAPOLIS, MD., AUGUST 15, 1919.

PAGE

INFORMATION INDEX
ADVERTISEMENTS, INDEX TO
PUBLICATIONS, U. S. NAVAL INSTITUTE.
SPECIAL NOTICE
TOPICS FOR Essays
List of Prize Essays

I (2) 1666

1667 ..1668

PROFESSIONAL NOTES

PREPARED BY

LIEUT. COMMANDER WALLACE L. LIND, U. S. Navy

GENERAL ARRANGEMENT

VESSELS BUILDING.

France NAVAL POLICY.

Germany MATÉRIEL.

Great Britain PERSONNEL.

Japan
OPERATIONS.

United States
MERCHANT MARINE.
NAVIGATION AND Radio.
ENGINEERING
AERONAUTICS
MISCELLANEOUS
CURRENT NAVAL AND PROFESSIONAL PAPERS..

1615 ..1616 . 1620

1621 ..1623

1632 1640 .1645 . 1651 1652

FRANCE French Naval POLICY.—It goes without saying that a power's use of its colonies depends on the command of the sea. The lessons of the war have combined with the financial situation and the temporary suppression of the German Navy in completely changing the naval policy of France. Previous to the war the Republic built mainly battleships, “arbitres des batailles,” and neglected scouts and other fleet auxiliaries. Gunnery was considered to be the deciding factor and speed was systematically sacrificed. To-day the bulk of French admirals favor the application by France of the famous principles of Admiral Aube, the founder of the "jeune école,” who, some thirty years since, advocated thať the most reliable elements of strength in a navy reside in “le nombre, la vitesse, l'invulnerabilité, la spécialization.” The able Admiral Daveluy, chief exponent in France of the doctrines of Mahan, has been convinced by the war and come round to those views. He is urging the construction by France of numerous submarines, of swarms of bombing seaplanes and of the fastest destroyers and light cruisers in the world, speed having been proved the most important element of success. With the exception of England, no power enjoys a strategic position so favorable as that of France for the utilization of flotillas, especially of aviation, that instrument of control of narrow seas. Admiral Ronarch (fifty-four years of age), the glorious hero of Dixmude, is to realize the new program.-Army and Navy Journal, 8/ 16.

THE BLACK SEA MUTINY.—The Minister of Marine made an excellent speech before the House concerning the unhappy events in the Black Sea. He set himself the task of establishing the true facts with precision, and to examine into the causes with a high degree of impartiality. His clear explanations wherein his sense of his official responsibilities is attuned to his humane sense of the circumstances, are of the kind to give one a proper appreciation of the events, and also to restore calm. He concluded as follows:

“One conclusion is deduced from these facts. The events in the Black Sea must be considered from a viewpoint taking into account all the cir

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