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ARTICLE 3 The above arrangement will extend to civil aircraft of all categories, including those used for public transport and those used for private purposes.

ARTICLE 4 The present arrangement may be terminated by either Government on sixty days' notice given to the other Government. In the event, however, that either Government should be prevented by future action of its legislature from giving full effect to the provisions of this arrangement it shall automatically lapse.

I am glad to assure Your Excellency that the foregoing text is what has been accepted by my Government in the course of the negotiations and is approved by it.

In accordance with the suggestion of Your Excellency it is understood that the arrangement will come into force on November 15, 1933.

Accept, Sir, the renewed assurances of my highest consideration. (SEAL)

H. H. BACHKE HONORABLE CORDELL HULL, Secretary of State,

Washington, D.C.

[No. 52]

Agreement with Saudi Arabia in regard to

November 7, 1933.

Provisional agreement between the United States of America and the

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in regard to diplomatic and consular
representation, juridical protection, commerce and navigation. Signed
November 7, 1933.
The Undersigned,

Mr. Robert Worth Bingham, Ambassador Extraordinary and representation, juridi

: Plenipotentiary of the United States of America at London, and cal protection, con: Sheikh Hafiz Wahba, Minister of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia at

.
London, desiring to confirm and make a record of the understanding
which they have reached in the course of recent conversations in
the names of their respective Governments in regard to diplomatic
and consular representation, juridical protection, commerce and
navigation, have signed this Provisional Agreement:

ARTICLE I.
The diplomatic representatives of each country shall enjoy in the
territories of the other the privileges and immunities derived from
generally recognized international law. The consular representa-
tives of each country, duly provided with exequatur, will be per-
mitted to reside in the territories of the other in the places wherein
consular representatives are by local laws permitted to reside; they
shall enjoy the honorary privileges and the immunities accorded to
such officers by general international usage; and they shall not be
treated in a manner less favorable than similar officers of any other
foreign country.

ARTICLE II. Subjects of His Majesty the King of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in the United States of America, its territories and possessions, and nationals of the United States of America, its territories and possessions, in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia shall be received and treated in accordance with the requirements and practices of generally recognized international law. In respect of their persons, possessions and rights, they shall enjoy the fullest protection of the laws and authorities of the country, and they shall not be treated in regard to their persons, property, rights and interests, in any manner less favorable than the nationals of any other foreign country.

ARTICLE III. In respect of import, export and other duties and charges affecting commerce and navigation, as well as in respect of transit, warehousing and other facilities, the United States of America, its territories and possessions, will accord to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia will accord to the United States of America, its territories and possessions, unconditional mostfavored nation treatment. Every concession with respect to any

1 Arabic text not printed.

-

REPRESENTATION, ETC.-SAUDI ARABIA.

1827

duty, charge or regulation affecting commerce or navigation now accorded or that may hereafter be accorded by the United States of America, its territories and possessions, or by the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to any foreign country will become immediately applicable without request and without compensation to the commerce and navigation of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and of the United States of America, its territories and possessions, respectively.

ARTICLE IV. The stipulations of this Agreement shall not extend to the treatment which is accorded by the United States of America to the commerce of Cuba under the provisions of the Commercial Convention concluded between the United States and Cuba on December 11, 1902, or the provisions of any other commercial convention which hereafter may be concluded between the United States of America and Cuba. Such stipulations, moreover, shall not extend to the treatment which is accorded to the commerce between the United States of America and the Panama Canal Zone or any of the dependencies of the United States of America or to the commerce of the dependencies of the United States of America with one another under existing or future laws.

Nothing in this Agreement shall be construed as a limitation of the right of either Government to impose, on such terms as it may see fit, prohibitions or restrictions of a sanitary character designed to protect human, animal, or plant life, or regulations for the enforcement of police or revenue laws.

Nothing in this Agreement shall be construed to affect existing statutes of either country in relation to the immigration of aliens or the right of either Government to enact such statutes.

ARTICLE V.

The present stipulations shall become operative on the day of signature hereof and shall remain respectively in effect until the entry in force of a definitive treaty of commerce and navigation, or until thirty days after notice of their termination shall have been given by the Government of either country, but should the Government of the United States of America be prevented by future action of its legislature from carrying out the terms of these stipulations, the obligations thereof shall thereupon lapse.

ARTICLE VI. The English and Arabic texts of the present agreement shall be of equal validity.

Signed at London this seventh day of November, one thousand nine hundred and thirty-three.

ROBERT WORTH BINGHAM (SEAL)
[Signature and seal of SHEIKH HAFIZ WAHBA)

(No. 53]

March 17, 1933. September 20, 1933.

Arrangement between the United States of America and the Union of

South Africa concerning air navigation. Effected by exchange of notes, signed March 19 and September 20, 1933; effective September 20, 1933.

The American Minister (Totten) to the Minister of External Affairs

of the Union of South Africa (Hertzog)

the Union of South

No. 166. LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

Pretoria, March 17, 1933. SIR: Arrangement with I have the honor to communicate the text of the arrangement Africa concerning air between the United States of America and the Union of South navigation.

Africa providing for navigation by aircraft of each country in the territory of the other, as understood by me to have been agreed to in the negotiations which have just been concluded between the Legation and your Ministry, as evidenced by your note of March 13, 1933 1 (File No. P.M. 66/1/1).

AIR NAVIGATION ARRANGEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF

AMERICA AND THE UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA,

Tentative provisions.

ARTICLE 1 Pending the conclusion of a convention between the United States of America and the Union of South Africa on the subject of air navigation, the operation of civil aircraft of the one country in the other country shall be governed by the following provisions.

ARTICLE 2

Area affected.

The present arrangement shall apply to Continental United States of America, exclusive of Alaska, and to the Union of South Africa, including the adjacent territorial waters of the two countries.

ARTICLE 3

Aircraft construed.

The term aircraft with reference to one or the other Party to this arrangement shall be understood to mean civil aircraft, including state aircraft used exclusively for commercial purposes, duly registered in the territory of such Party.

Freedom of passage.

ARTICLE 4 Each of the Parties undertakes to grant liberty of passage above its territory in time of peace to the aircraft of the other Party, provided that the conditions set forth in the present arrangement are observed.

It is, however, agreed that the establishment and operation of regular air routes by an air transport company of one of the Parties within the territory of the other Party or across the said

Regular air routes by transport company.

* Not printed.

Consent required.

Limit on pilot's li.

censes.

territory, with or without intermediary landing, shall be subject to the prior consent of the other Party given on the principle of reciprocity and at the request of the party whose nationality the air transport company possesses.

The parties to this arrangement agree that the period in which pilots may, while holding valid pilot licenses issued or rendered valid by either country, operate registered aircraft of that country in the other country for non-industrial or non-commercial purposes shall be limited to a period not exceeding six months from the time of entry for the purpose of operating aircraft, unless prior to the expiration of this period the pilots obtain from the Government of the country in which they are operating, pilot licenses authorizing them to operate aircraft for non-industrial or non-commercial purposes.

ARTICLE 5

The aircraft of each of the Parties to this arrangement, their crews

Jurisdiction over air

craft, and passengers, shall, while within the territory of the other Party, be subject to the general legislation in force in that territory, as well as the regulations in force therein relating to air traffic in general, to the transport of passengers and goods and to public safety and order in so far as these regulations apply to all foreign aircraft, their crews and passengers.

Each of the Parties to this arrangement shall permit the import or export of all merchandise which may be legally imported or exported and also the carriage of passengers, subject to any customs immigration and quarantine restrictions, into or from their respective territories in the aircraft of the other Party, and such aircraft, their passengers and cargoes, shall enjoy the same privileges as and shall not be subjected to any other or higher duties or charges than those which the aircraft of the country, imposing such duties or charges, engaged in international commerce, and their cargoes and passengers, or the aircraft of any foreign country likewise engaged, and their cargoes and passengers, enjoy or are subjected to.

Each of the Parties to this arrangement may reserve to its own aircraft air commerce between any two points neither of which is in a foreign country. Nevertheless the aircraft of either Party may proceed from any aerodrome in the territory of the other Party which they are entitled to use to any other such aerodrome either for the purpose of landing the whole or part of their cargoes or passengers or of taking on board the whole or part of their cargoes or passen. gers, provided that such cargoes are covered by through bills of lading, and such passengers hold through tickets, issued respectively for a journey whose starting place and destination both are not points between which air commerce has been duly so reserved, and such aircraft, while proceeding as aforesaid, from one aerodrome to another, shall, notwithstanding that such aerodromes are points between which air commerce has been duly reserved, enjoy all the privileges of this arrangement.

ARTICLE 6

Restricted areas.

Each of the Parties to this arrangement shall have the right to prohibit air traffic over certain areas of its territory, provided that no distinction in this matter is made between its aircraft engaged in international commerce and the aircraft of the other Party likewise engaged. The areas above which air traffic is thus prohibited by either Party must be notified to the other Party.

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