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Compensation Act litigation, 334
et seq.; question of Divorce Re-
form, 337; its bearing on morality,
340–1; Land Registry of Titles,
341 ; economy should be enforced

in law as a national duty, 342
English Banking, 104; criticism of

English bankers, 104; principles
of management, 105; assistance
for trades, 105, 106; financing of
exports, 107; working methods
of exporters, 107 et seq.; wat
and settlement of accounts, I10;
co-operation between manufacturer
and banker, III; its effect upon
world's trade, III; dangers of
foreign trade, 112, 113;
petition amongst banks, 114 ;
Accepting Houses of London, 114,
115; banking facilities for home
trade, 115, 116; methods of
financing, 116, 117; policy of

bankers as against critics, 118
English Railways, The Future of,

84; relation of railways to public
authority, 84; Government con-
trol, 84, 85; financial working,
85; Board of Trade Railway
Returns, 86; increase of wages,
87, 88; effect of war upon traffic,
88; State responsibility, 88, 89;
dissatisfaction of railway policy,
89, 90; Royal Commission en-
quiry, 90; comparison between
passenger and goods traffic, 91;
effect of mileage on costs of work-
ing, 92, 93; foreign methods,
93, 94 ; reforms necessary, 95;
Government support, 95, 96 ;
economy in operating expenses,
96; abolition of competition, 97;
combination of systems, 98; State
ownership, 99; political influence

management, 99 et seq.;
Government's financial liabilities,
102; comparison with Mexican
system, 102, 103 ; need for recon-
struction, 103

on

pensions, 121, 122; duty of State
to those disabled, 123; Royal
National Lifeboat Institution,
123; making fit the inefficient,
124 ; relation of temperament
to capacity, 124 et seq. ; handicap
of idleness, 125; experiments in
training, 126 et seq.; care of the
blind, 125, 126; St. Dunstan's
Hostel for Blinded Sailors and
Soldiers, 126; good work of
various institutions, 126, 127;
delay in supplying artificial limbs,
127; Lord Roberts' Memorial
Workshops, 127, 128; specialisa-
tion in workshops, 128; aptitude
of men for agriculture, 129; effect
of habit in change of occupation,
130; French system of re-educa-
tion, 131 et seq.; Belgian system,
132; military discipline while
training, 133 ;

Professor Jules
Amar quoted, 134, 135 ; efficiency
in industrial production, 136

Economy in Law, 319; necessity
of co-ordination and consolidation
of legal matters, 319; efforts of
Moses to establish courts of law,
320 ; public discontent with exist-
ing laws, 320; Divorce Com-
mission, 320, 326; necessity of
a Minister of Justice, 321-2 ;
Lord Chancellor, 321 ; jurisdiction
of the County Courts, 323-4 ;
need for business system, 324;
Workmen's Compensation Act,
324, 334 et seq. ; overlapping and
reduplication of legal statistics,
324 ; work performed by High
Courts, 325; hardship of poor
people owing to exorbitant cost
of litigation, 326; circuit reform,
327-8; abolition of small Assize
towns, 329; working methods of
County Courts, 330–1; necessity
of a rearrangement of districts,
331 ; principles of reform, 332–3 ;
opposition of local and vested
interests, 333; Report of the
Royal Commission on the Civil
Service, 333; waste of Workmen's

Food Prices : A Warning, 196;

economy in consumption of food,
196; increased cost of living, 197 ;
Nantes, 184; its effect upon
English modern literature, 185;
philosophy of English politics,
185, 186; Abbé Prévost, 186; dif-
fusion of English ideas in France,
187, 188; Voltaire as a link be-
tween English and French litera-
ture, 189, 190; controversy be-
tween the Deists and apologists,
191 ; religion and liberty of
thought, 192, 193 ;

re-

law of supply and demand,
198; its effect on the price of
food, 199; factors that count,
199; Government interference,
200; administrative help to poor,
201; bonus to lower-paid em-
ployees, 201 ; taxation as a means
of restriction, 202 et seq. ;
striction of supplies affects the
poor, 202, 203 ; economic waste
of rationing system, 203; difficulty
in labour, 204; agricultural work
for women, 205; maximum prices
lessens supply, 206 ; Mr. Prothero's
scheme, 207; heavy taxation
37, 38; King Constantine orders
shooting of marines, 39; Italians'
antagonism to Greece, 39, 40;
nationalism and its effect upon
Balkan problem, 40, 41; Veni-
zelos' redemption of Greece, 41
et seq.; removal of King Con-
stantine, 44; proclamation of

success of
English ideas in France, 193;
its relationship to present unity
of the Alliance, 194, 195

only remedy, 208
France, M. Anatole, quoted, 179
France and the British Effort, 45 ;

effect of invasion upon French
literature, 45; lack of under-
standing between nations, 46;
French people's attitude towards
British effort, 47, 48; comrade-
ship between British and French
armies, 48; tribute to British
Fleet, 49; closer relationship be-
tween French and English litera-
ture, 50; English temperament,
52; pessimism and patriotism,
53; disturbing attitude of the
press, 53; English sporting atti-
tude to the war, 54 ; change after
experiences with Germans, 54,
55 ; people's materialism and in-
difference to higher ideals, 56;
comparison with rest of Europe,
57; disadvantage of individualism,
57; England undisturbed by great
crisis, 58; moral anger gradually
aroused, 58 et seq.; sympathy
of populations to perpetual
alliance, 59, 60; French complete

confidence in Britain, 61
French and English Genius, 178;

race as a factor in constitution of
men, 178; variations of aptitudes,
179; Anglo-French Alliance, 179,
180; similarity of object between
nations, 181; French feeling to-
wards England, 182; appreciation
of English literature, 183; Racine
and Corneille, 183; Edict of

Genius, French and English, 178.

See French
Germany, influence in Austrian

politics, 9; plan to rule Austria,

21 ; organisation in Greece, 25
Gladstone, Rt. Hon. W. E., 6, 7,

168
Gosse, Edmund, The Life of

Algernon Charles Swinburne, 249,
252 et seq. ; France and the British

Effort, 45. See France
Graham, R. B. Cunninghame, A

Vanished Arcadia, 269–272
Greek Monarchy, The End of, 23;

smaller nations' distrust of the
Great Powers, 23, 24; their in-
difference towards present war,
24;
German

propaganda in
Greece, 24 et seq.; England's
rights of intervention, 26, 27;
policy towards small nations, 28;
King Constantine's defiance of
constitution, 29; maintenance of
neutrality, 29, 30; Venizelos
advocates war, 30; his dismissal,
30; King Constantine's negotia-
tions wth Germany, 30, 31 ; be-
trayal of Serbia, 31, 32; electorato
suppressed, 32; Allies insulted,
32 ; civilians terrorised, 33; King
Constantine's pretenc of recon-
ciliation, 33; his contempt for
Allies,

34 ;

Viscount Grey's
caution, 35, 36; British policy,
36, 37; Allied Powers' hesitation,

Greek Republic, 44
Grey, Viscount, 28, 35, 228

on

Haggard, Sir Rider, report

Inge, W. R., The Birth-Rate, 62.

See Birth
Ireland, Prussia, and Poland, 158.

See Prussia

colonising of ex-soldiers, 217, 219
Hall, A. D., Agriculture after the

War, 343, 345
Hart, A. B., The Monroe Doctrine,

227, 235
Holland, T. E., The European Concert

in the Eastern Question, 23, 27
Hubris, The Peril of, 288; moral

and intellectual perversion of the
German mind, 288; gospel of
national self-aggrandisement, 288;
war an instrument of German
culture, 289; connexion between
the new gospel and the early
German thinkers, 290–3; their
devotion to truth, 290-1 ;
philosophy and religion, 291 ;
Kant, 291 ; his teachings, 291 ;
Hegel, 291-2 ; political aspirations
of Germany, 293; unity under
Prussian rule, 294 ; Bismarck,
294-5; his doctrine of Might
is Right,' 294 ; national instinct
of obedience, 295; people's self-
complacency, 296; their illusions
of a European hegemony, 296;
comparisons between ancient
Greece and modern Germany, 297 ;
influence on the public policy of
Germany, 298; her pre-eminence
in the physical sciences, 298 ;
organisation of research, 298; in-
tellectual atrophy, 299 ; deterio-
ration of the mind for higher
ideals, 300 ; freedom of thought
stifled, 301; comparison with
France and Russia, 301-2; the
perils 'of peace on a people's
greatness, 302

Jewish National Movement, The, 303 ;

reconstruction of Europe, 303 ;
claims of the Jewish nationality,
303; religious community without
politics, 304; national sentiment,
304;

their adaptability, 305;
an integral part of the nations
among whom they live, 306;
emancipation movement, 306; re-
establishment of Jews in Palestine,
307; persecution in Russia, 307;
absence of Jewish national con-
sciousness, 308; Jewish Bund,
309; development of language
and literature, 309; Yiddish pro-
claimed national language, 310 ;
controversy between Bundists and
Zionists, 310-1; basis of national
autonomy, 311-2; nationality a
personal attribute, 312; scheme
of self-government, 312–3; agita-
tion for national autonomy, 314 ;
the Zionist movement, 315; effect
of present war

upon political
ambitions, 316; Zionist solution
of the Jewish question, 316 ;
governing rule of Jewish life and
its bearing upon the creation of a
State in Palestine, 317

Kitchener, Lord, 47, 49, 366 et seq.

319. See

Law, Economy in,

Economy
Lewis, Sir George, quoted 338-9

Maccas, Léon, Ainsi parla Venizelos,

23, 29
Marriott, J. A. R., Prussia, Poland,

and Ireland, 158. See Prussia
Mavrogordato, John, The End of

Greek Monarchy, 23. See Greek
Middleton, C. B., The Recent Develop-

ment of German Agriculture, 343,

349 et seq.
Migration within the Empire, 209

Dominions Royal Commission re-

ance of keeping control of vital
industries in our hands, 382–3;
possible action of neutral countries
during war, 382; committee to
consider the commercial and in-
dustrial policy to be adopted
after the war, 383-4; reasons
for preferential tariffs, 384;
Dominions Royal Commission,
385-6; natural resources of the
self-governing Dominions, 386–7;
principle of an imperial com-
mercial policy, 387–8; improve-
ment of harbours, 388; inter-
change of school-teachers, 389;
creation of an Imperial Develop-
ment Board, 389; dangers of a
centralised control of government,
390 ; scheme to pay off National
Debt by developing resources of
the Empire, 390–1; Government
control compared with private
enterprise, 390—3 ; defects of State
enterprise, 390–3; trade restric-
tions of the old colonial system,
394-5; effect on the value of
colonial produce, 396–8; sugar,
396; cattle industry in Ireland,
397; wool, 397; effect of fiscal
policy on Ireland's commerce,
398–9; Free Trade, 399 ; defects
of fiscal system on internal trade,
399–400 ; benefit of Free Trade
to Ireland, 401-3; abolition of
the Corn Laws, 401; protection
and imperial preference, 403-4 :
protectionist spirit an element of
discord, 405; economic conditions
of Empire make fiscal unity almost
impossible, 405; comparison with
United States and Germany, 405–
6; India, 406; German com-
mercial penetration, 407 ;
nomic prosperity due to the

eco-

port, 209; the steady exodus of
population, 210; check caused
by war, 210; consequences of
increased female labour, 211;
demobilisation and employment,
211; social conditions altered,
212; effect on emigration, 212;
enquiry into organised emigration
and systematic colonisation, 212,
213; past attitude to emigra-
tion, 213 ;

Central Emigration
Authority, 213; Magna Carta,
214; report on the settling of
ex-soldiers, 214 el seq.; centralisa-
tion of emigration associations,
214; British Empire and private
enterprise, 215; transportation
settlements, 215; room for colonial
enterprise, 215; loss to colonies
through officialism, 216; emigra-
tion of women, 216; investiga-
tion by Sir Rider Haggard, 217;
colonies' offer to ex-service men
217, 218; financing of settlers,
218, 219; tropical colonisation,
220; Northern Australia, 221;
effective occupation only title
to possession, 221; difference
between tropical and temperate
colonisation, 222 ; West Indies,
222 ; Schools of Tropical Medicine,
223; fight against disease, 223 ;
economic considerations, 224-6;
white labour and black labour,
225; suggestions for division of

tropical portion of Australia, 226
Monarchy, The End of Greek, 23.

See Greek

policy of freedom, 407-8
Peace Programme and the British

Empire, President Wilson's, 227.

See Wilson
Peril of Hubris, The, 288. See

Hubris
Poland, Prussia, and Ireland, 158.

See Prussia

Nietzsche, Friedrich, quoted, 288

Orr, J., Agriculture in Oxfordshire,

343, 357

Paths of Empire, The Two, 379 ;

loyalty and strength of Greater
Britain, 379; old colonial system,
379–80; its relationship with
the system of imperial preferential
tariffs, 379; question of sub-
marine warfare, 380–1; import-

Prussia, Poland, and Ireland, 158;

re-establishment of independence
of Poland, 158, 159; failure of
Germany's policy of intimidation,
160 ; suggested parallel between
Poland and Ireland, 161; failure
of conquest, 162; constitutional
relations of England and Ireland,
162, 163; cause of rebellions,
163, 164; religion a stumbling-
block, 163, 164 ; Cromwell's policy,
164; Treaty of Limerick, 164;
Irish Parliament deprived of in-
dependence, 164; restrictions re-
moved and commercial freedom
regained, 165; legislative union
formed, 166; Catholic Emancipa-
tion, 166; the Great Famine
and its effect on emigration, 166,
167; relations between tenants
and landlords, 167; English parlia-
ments' attempt to solve agri-
cultural problems, 168; religious
question, 169; Home Rule Act,
169; relation of English policy
to Prussian treatment of Poland
170, 171 ; formation of Poland,
171 ; reactionary policy of Prussia,
172, 173; insurrection of Poles,
173; Bismarck's Polish policy,
174 ; his persistent persecution,
175 ; ultimate failure to Germanise
Poland, 176; Anglo-Irish contrast,

176, 177
Puaux, René. L'Armée Anglaise sur

le Continent, 45, 47 et seq.

Soldiers, The Re-Education of Dis-

abled, 119. See Disabled
Soldiers' and Sailors' Families Associ-

ation, The Work of, 139; allow
ances granted to families of fight-
ing men insufficient, 139 ; lack of
properly organised system, 139 ;
National Relief Fund, 139; state
of confusion in the Paymaster's
Department, 140, 141; leads to
distress in many families, 140,
141; War Office attitude to the
Association, 141 ; fictitious claims
for allowances, 142; work en-
tailed, 143; voluntary support,
143 ; difficulties of administration,
144, 145; morality and marriage,
146;, its production of hardships,
147; Poor Law Authorities, 147;
care of motherless children, 148;
care of soldiers' wives visiting
London, 148; co-operation with
Travellers' Aid Society, 148; ad-
ministrative control of various
funds, 149; audit control in
connexion with war relief work,
150; methods of investigative
work, 150, 151 ; effect of war on
financial position of soldiers' wives,
151, 152; press agitation, 152,
153; methods of working, 153 ;
formation of Statutory Committee,
154 ; effects of change upon relief
work, 156; Ministry of Pensions

formed, 157
Steed, H. Wickham, Austria and

Europe, 1. See Austria
Suarès, André, Angleterre, 45, 47
Sutherland, A., The Origin and

Growth of the Moral Instinct,

Quiller-Couch, A., Swinburne, 249.

See Swinburne

Railways, The Future of English, 84.

62, 63
Swinburne, 249; Poems and Ballads,

249; his methods of advertising,
249–50 ; compared with other
poets, 250 ; his sway over others,
251; his sudden decline, 252 ;
his elvish genius, 253 ; his birth
and childhood, 253 ; his fragile-
ness, 254 ; his enthusiasm for
the earlier English poets, 255;
unaffected by opinion, 255; his
worshipful attitude to old men of

See English
Re-Education of Disabled Soldiers,
The, 119.

See Disabled

Seeley, Sir John, The Expansion of

England, 379 et seq.
Shairp, L. V., The Re-Education of

Disabled Soldiers, 119. See Dis-

abled
Smith, Adam, The Wealth of Nations,

379, 395 et seq.

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