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INDEX OF AUTHORS.

.353

....254

PAGE

PAGB
Adams, J. Q............

...350

Lingard, John.....................278
Alfieri..

...385
Lockhart, J. G.......

..........58
Alison, Archibald.

...216
London Atlas...

..374
Ames, Fisher

..180
London Courier..

149
Anonymous...... 82, 149, 203, 222, 390 Longfellow, H. W..12, 187, 240, 397,413
Athenæum..

1

Macaulay, T. B...........255, 270, 315
Aytoun, William E...

...275, 290
Munn, Horace.....

..402
Bancroft, George.

..173 Viilton, John.....
Beecher, H. W..
74 Mitchell, D. G.......

.364
Belsham, William.

. 101 Mitchel, o. M................ 245, 358
Bryant, William C....22, 220, 247, 303 Mitford, Miss

..368
Buckminster, Joseph S..
47 Montgomery, James

147
Bulwer...

4!+ Moore, Thomas...... ...214, 311
Byron, Lord..
. .266, 285, 363 Naylor, C. C.......

.326
Campbell, Thomas, 31, 55, 168, 272, 355 Newell, William

..218
Chambers's Miscellany.

3 Norton, Andrews
Channing, William E.........131, 339 Nott, E......................... ..321
Chatham, Lord.....
97 Ossian..

.209
Choate, Rufus...

..307 Pierpont, John ...............105, 176
Coleridge, S, T...
. 107, 347 Poe, E. A

..............378
Collins, William..
.3:9 Prescott, W. H..

63
Cowper, William.
.120 Priest, Miss...

183
Croly, George..
..422 Reait, Thomas Buchanan

...428
Cumming, John....

.200
Rogers, Samuel....

177
Derzhavin..

223 Scott, Sir Walter..
Dickens, Charles..

..24, 67, 85, 126
.159 Seward, William H....

.312
Edwards, Miss..

4. Shakspeare ..133, 228, 394, 417
Everett, Edward......39, 235, 288, 345 Sheil, R. L....

.420
Felton, C. C.........

..203 Smith, Horace ....................165
Ferguson, S...

..376 Smith, Sydney .
Follen, Charles......

....................404
...184 Southey, Robert ..........

..195
Galt, John

..382 Sprague, Charles......
Grattan, Henry..

..259, 323
...103 Sterne, Lawrence..............

87
Gray, Thomas

....405 Sumner, Charles............. 205, 430
Greenwood, F. W. P... .....139 Swain, Leonard.

..250
Hall, Robert...
..113 Taylor, Jane......................

8
Hemans, Mrs..

152, 167, 341 Tennyson, Alfred
Holmes, O. W............

.................122
.77, 125, 319 Tudor, William. ................... 90
Hood, Thomas....
331, 356 Wallace, Miss.....................

9+
Howison, John

Ware, Henry

..319
Humt, Leigh

.........143
Wayland, Francis.

..243
Ide, George B...

.227

Webster, Daniel...28, 154, 156, 212, 300
Irving, W..

......15, 116, 170, 191, 361
Jerrold, Douglas....

Whittier, J. G.....
..328 Willis, N. P...

.210
Johnson, Samuel..
35 Wilson, John

..282
Karamsin...

..372 Winthrop, R.C...........
Kellogg, Elijah

.......... 410, 433
..334 Wirt, William......................

44
Körner, Karl Theodor ............338 Wolfe, Charles....................239
Knowles, Sheridan........ .292 Wordsworth, William.... ........ .232
Lincoln, Abraham..

........... 425, 426

........ 108

.33, 305

TABLE OF VOWEL SOUNDS.

A Vowel is a letter which represents a free and uninterrupted sound of the kuman voice.

An Equivalent is a letter or combination of letters used to represent an elementary sound more appropriately represented by another letter or letters. The Equivalents given in these tables are those of more common occurrence.

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The following vowel sounds cannot be easily pronounced alone, as distinct elements, so as to be distinguished from some of the other sounds.

NAME.

.

NAXE.

EXAMPLES. A long before R. Fáre, pair. A intermediate ...

Fast, branch. A slight or obscure . Liar, palace. E like A long before R Hệir, thêre, E slight or obscure . . Brier, fuel.

EXAMPLES.
I slight or obscure . Ruin, ability.
O slight or obscure . Actor, confess.
U slight or obscure . Sulphụr, famoựs
Y slight or obscure . Truly, envy.

TABLE OF CONSONANT SOUNDS.

A Consonant is a letter which cannot be sounded, or but imperfectly, without the aid of a vowel; or, it represents a sound that is modified by some interruption during its passage through the organs of speech.

Vocal Consonants are those uttered with a slight degree of vocality, but less than that of a vowel. They are formed with a vibration of the vocal cords.

Aspirate Consonants are those in which the pure breath alone is heard. They are formed without any vibration of the vocal cords,

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Q has the sound of k, and is always followed by u, which, in this position, commonly has the sound of w, but is sometimes silent.

WH is an aspirated w, pronounced as if written hw.

1 Sometimes called Subvocals, or Subtonics.

? H sounded before a vowel, is an expulsion of the breath after the organs are in a position to sound the vowel.

AN

INTRODUCTORY TREATISE

ON

ELOCUTION;

WITH

PRINCIPLES AND ILLUSTRATIONS, ARRANGED FOR TEACHING

AND PRACTICE.

BY

PROF. MARK BAILEY,

INSTRUCTOR OF ELOCUTION IN

YALE COLLEGE,

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1863, by MARK BAILEY, in the

Clerk's Office of the District Court of Connecticut.

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