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Berd, heet, sounds bearded. Dij vee's, sounds the face.

TO KILL TWO BIRDS WITH ONE STONE.

To do more than you intended; to overdo the business in point; to have taken supererogatory means [pains]; in attempting one thing, to do, unintentionally, two. T'u kille toe behoord's, wijse wan's toe hun; q. e. towards you a chilling [cold] manner is proper [fitting], to him such behaviour is wrong [misapplied]; checking, to a disposition like your's, is absolutely necessary; but to one such as his, would be ill-judged [unjustifiable]. To keep such as you at a distance may be right; but to him unnecessary; implying a direction to the person in question to distinguish between dispositions, and regulate his conduct towards each accordingly, otherwise he will be acting wrong to all those he has to do with. The relation, in point of meaning, in the original may be traced, notwithstanding the change incurred by the travesty. Behoord, the participle past of behooren, to be due, to become, to belong to, to appertain to, and sounds burd; and so we pronounce bird. Wan, wrong, bad, vain, useless [evidently of the same root as vanus, and our own terms want and wane], sounds one, the aspirate w disappearing. Wijse, manner, mode, form, way, rule, tune, air of a song, and sounds with. 'S toe hun [is to him] sounds stone.

A STRUMPET.

In the well-known meaning of a prostitute. Er stier ruime bed; q. e. there [with her] money [a present] makes room in the bed; with the one in question, a tribute [pay] procures a place in her bed; for money you may have her for your bedfellow; and, morally, implying a selfish brutal availment of the distress of the ruined female by

the reckless man. JOHNSON says, the term is of doubtful origin, and then adds the Latin stuprum [a rape] and strope, which he gives as an old French term for lasciviousness [lechery], for the probable sources; but I suspect neither word can have any relation to her who is reduced to the sad plight implied by the term strumpet; setting aside the impossibility of finding out any relationship in point of form or sound. HORNE TOOKE tells us, with his accustomed confidence and ignorance, the word is as the Dutch stronpöt, by which he means strontpot, the coarsest, most low-lived, and disgusting term in the Dutch language for a chaisepercé [close stool]; as if there was another heart or head, but his own, which would devise such an unmanly, beastly, expression for a female, even of that unfortunate and much-to-be-commiserated class. Besides, what relation has it to the state inferred by the word strumpet? What analogy in sound to that word? It would apply more truly to the skull which contains a lucubration so characteristic both of his heart and brain. Stier, steur, Ruymen, to Bedde, bed,

F

d stuyr, tribute, pay, present, tax.

make room, to make place [space].
as with us; but, d and t and b and p being well-
known intermutating sounds, we have only to pro-
nounce d as t, and b as p, and the word sounds
pet. Stier ruyme, sounds strum. Ruym and our
room are the same word. Strontpot and schijtpot
are equivalent terms for a same utensil. Stront
[merda, stercus, ventris onus, oletum] plainly a
same word with the French estronc, and the
Italian stronzo, in a same sense; and probably as
struntus, according to JOSEPH SCALIGER, apud
veteres Latinos stercus rotundum.

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Danno di morso a gran bocconi, ciascuno in unu, e subito l'uno sputa fuori, e dice: Oimè, ch' e' sono STRONZI di cane.

BURCH, Q. 83,

"Who, quoth she, has suffered approchen to this sike manne these common STROMPETTES, of whiche is the place that men callen theatre, the whiche onely ne asswagen not his sorowes with remedies, bot thei wold feden and noryshe him with swete venime ?"-CHAUCER, BOETH.

HE STOOD IN HIS OWN LIGHT.

He was an impediment to his own success in respect to the case in question; he was the cause of his own wrong. Hie stoot in is hoon; lydt! q. e. in this case, to begin the attack is an injury [wrong]; let him suffer for it [take the consequences]; implying, as he conducted himself wantonly wrong, so let him suffer accordingly for it. Instooten, stooten in, to begin an attack, to rush or break in upon, and thus to commit an outrage. Hoon, injury, wrong, affront, defiance. Lijden, lyden, to suffer, to endure. The original expression resounds into the spelling of its present travesty.

A JACK OF ALL TRADES.

As one ready for any dirty work; one always prepared to undertake any vile job he is wanted to perform for another. Er je hack! afval te reed 's; q. e. there, you dealer in vile articles, the offal is ready! There you trader in foul ware, here's a lot of garbage for your stall [wheelbarrow]. The phrase is commonly used as typical of some political jobber; some ministerial or state hack; but applies equally to any base, unscrupulous, time-serving tool of others; to one who lends himself from interested motives, to do the dirty work of an employer. It is never used in a good sense; never as importing diligence, capacity, industry, or skill. Je, ye, you. Hack, a dealer in dirty wares, articles of the vilest kind, such as dogs' meat, cinders, old clothes, &c.; negotiator mercis vilioris. Afval, the same word with our offal, in regard both to sound and to meaning; and thus importing

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rejected garbage, useless rubbish. Afval has also the sense of falling off, backsliding, apostacy, turning the back upon friends, abandoning engagements, promises, professions, and even patrons, when become powerless. Te reed's, is ready, at hand, and sounds trades.

TO SEND A MAN TO COVENTRY.

As to silence some obnoxious froward person belonging to the society [party, company] in question; to put an end to the nuisance caused by the conduct or conversation of one who proves himself a greater ruffian than the rule of society makes it necessary to endure, except from some special countervailing interest to be expected from him. Toesie! end er m'aen toe! kauw! vent! te rije! q. e. mind what you are about! make an end of this subject of conversation! you chattering fool! you disgraceful fellow! to order! and thus a prosopopoeia in the person of one of the company who voluntarily takes upon himself to speak in consonance with the feeling he perceives to pervade the rest in regard to the one in question, and, of course, in full reliance of their common support as respects his treatment of the obnoxious offender. Like all judgments proceeding from the common feeling of an unprejudiced and disinterested body, never unjustly applied, and, consequently, irresistible. Toesien, to take care of one's conduct; to be upon our guard as to what we say or do. Enden, eijnden, to finish, to have done with. Toe, expletively used in this place. Kauw, a jackdaw; and thus the trope of a foolish chatterer. Vente, veyn, corresponds with our fellow in all its imports; but, in the first form, now only used in relation to some vile and despicable person, as we do the term fellow in a same instance. "Daer quam dees dagen een VENT by my, die my maecte verstoort; q. e. there came a fellow to

Berd, heet, sounds bearded. Dij vee's, sounds the face.

TO KILL TWO BIRDS WITH ONE STONE.

To do more than you intended; to overdo the business in point; to have taken supererogatory means [pains]; in attempting one thing, to do, unintentionally, two. T'u kille toe behoord's, wijse wan's toe hun; q. e. towards you a chilling [cold] manner is proper [fitting], to him such behaviour is wrong [misapplied]; checking, to a disposition like your's, is absolutely necessary; but to one such as his, would be ill-judged [unjustifiable]. To keep such as you at a distance may be right; but to him unnecessary; implying a direction to the person in question to distinguish between dispositions, and regulate his conduct towards each accordingly, otherwise he will be acting wrong to all those he has to do with. The relation, in point of meaning, in the original may be traced, notwithstanding the change incurred by the travesty. Behoord, the participle past of behooren, to be due, to become, to belong to, to appertain to, and sounds burd; and so we pronounce bird. wrong, bad, vain, useless [evidently of the same root as vanus, and our own terms want and wane], sounds one, the aspirate w disappearing. Wijse, manner, mode, form, way, rule, tune, air of a song, and sounds with. 'S toe hun [is to him] sounds

Wan,

stone.

A STRUMPET.

Er

In the well-known meaning of a prostitute. stier ruime bed; q. e. there [with her] money [a present] makes room in the bed; with the one in question, a tribute [pay] procures a place in her bed; for money you may have her for your bedfellow; and, morally, implying a selfish brutal availment of the distress of the ruined female by

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