Слике страница
PDF
ePub

66. Bru

" Cas. Do not presume too much upon my love;
I may do that I shall be sorry for.

You have done that you should be sorry for.
There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats;
For I am armed so strong in honesty,
That they pass by me as the idle wind,
Which I respect not.

Cas. A friend should bear his friend's infirmities,
But Brutus makes mine greater than they are.

Bru. I do not, TILL YOU PRACTISE THEM ON ME.
Cas. You love me not.

I do not like your faults.”

[ocr errors]

And the colloquy proceeding, each finally comes to understand the other, appreciates his character and attitude, and the impetuous, gallant Cassius exclaims, “Give me your hand!” — to which Brutus replies, “And my heart too!” Afterwards, with hand and heart united, on the field of Philippi they together upheld the liberties of Rome.

The North and the South, Sir, as I fondly trust, amidst all differences, will ever have hand and heart for each other; and believing in the sure prevalence of Almighty Truth, I confidently look forward to the good time, when both will unite, according to the sentiments of the Fathers and the true spirit of the Constitution, in declaring Freedom, and not Slavery, NATIONAL, to the end that the Flag of the Republic, wherever it floats, on sea or land, within the National jurisdiction, may cover none but freemen. Then will be achieved that Union contemplated at the beginning, against which the storms of faction and the assaults of foreign power shall beat in vain, as upon the Rock of Ages, -and LIBERTY, seeking a firm foothold, WILL HAVE AT. LAST WHEREON TO

STAND AND MOVE THE WORLD.

WHEN WILL THE NORTH BE AROUSED ?

LETTER TO A PERSONAL FRIEND, MARCH 30, 1854.

The following private letter found its way into the public prints.

MY

SENATE CHAMBER, March 30, 1854.
Y DEAR : Your letter has cheered and

strengthened me. It came to me, too, with pleasant memories of early life. As I read it, the gates, of the Past seemed to open, and I saw again the bright fields of study in which we walked together.

Our battle here has been severe, and much of its brunt has fallen upon a few. For weeks my trials and anxieties were intense. It is a satisfaction to know that they have found sympathy among good men.

But the Slave Power will push its tyranny yet further, and there is but one remedy, - Union at the North without distinction of party, to take possession of the National Government, and administer it in the spirit of Freedom, and not of Slavery. Oh, when will the North be aroused ?

Ever sincerely yours,

CHARLES SUMNER

A LIBERTY-LOVING EMIGRATION TO GUARD

KANSAS.

LETTER TO A MASSACHUSETTS COMMITTEE, May 1, 1854.

MY

SENATE CHAMBER, May 1, 1854. DEAR SIR, - I cannot be with you at your

meeting on Wednesday next: my post of duty is here. But I must not lose the opportunity afforded by your invitation to express anew my abhorrence of the outrage upon Freedom and public faith attempted by the Nebraska Bill, and to offer my gratitude to those who unite in the good work of opposing it.

In this warfare there is room for every human activity. By speech, vote, public meeting, sermon, and prayer, we have already striven. But a new agent is now announced. It is proposed to organize a company of Liberty-loving citizens, who shall enter upon the broad lands in question, and by example, voice, and vote, trained under the peculiar institutions of Massachusetts, overrule the designs of slave-masters. The purpose has a nobleness which gives assurance of success.

With a heart full of love for Massachusetts, her schools, libraries, churches, and happy homes, I should hesitate to counsel any one to turn away from her, a voluntary exile. I do not venture such advice. But if any there be among us, to whom our goodly Commonwealth seems narrow, and who incline to cast their lines in other places, - to such I would say, that they will do well, while becoming, each for himself, the artificer of his fortune, to enter into the Sacred Legion by which Liberty shall be safely guarded in Nebraska and Kansas. Thus will mingle public good with private advantage.

The Pilgrim Fathers turned their backs upon their native land to secure Liberty for themselves and their children. The emigrants whom you organize have a higher motive. Liberty for themselves and their children is already secured in Massachusetts. They will go to secure Liberty for others, — to guard an immense territory from the invasion of Slavery, and to dedicate it forever to Liberty. In such an expedition volunteers may win à victory of peace, which history will record with admiration and gratitude.

Believe me, dear Sir,
Very faithfully yours,

CHARLES SUMNER.

THOMAS DREW, Esq., Chairman of the Committee.

FINAL PROTEST, FOR HIMSELF AND THE CLERGY OF

NEW ENGLAND, AGAINST SLAVERY IN NEBRASKA AND KANSAS.

SPEECH IN THE SENATE, ON THE NIGHT OF THE FINAL PASSAGE OF THE

NEBRASKA AND KANSAS BILL, MAY 25, 1854.

Among the important incidents of the Nebraska Debate was a protest from three thousand clergymen of New England, which was severely denounced by the supporters of the aggression, especially by Mr. Douglas. Particular objection was taken to the words, “In the name of Almighty God, and in his presence," which were employed by the protestants. The heats on both sides increased. At a later stage Mr. Sumner felt constrained to speak again, which he did for himself and the much-abused clergy. This brief effort attracted unusual attention. It seemed to meet the rising sentiments of the people, and especially of the clergy. Rev. Dr. Allen, formerly President of Bowdoin College, wrote: “Our Northampton Courier of yesterday contained your bold and admirable midnight speech. I thank you for what you said for the clergy, but more especially what you said for the country and for Freedom.' Rev. Dr. Storrs, of Braintree, Massachusetts, an eminent Congregationalist, wrote: “I took my pen only to say a single word, - to tell you of my grateful admiration of your courage, faithfulness, and eloquence in defence of truth and godliness against the increasing tide of hellish principles and passions." Rev. Theodore Parker wrote: “ I have had no time to thank you for your noble speech till this minute. Nat. Bowditch says it is the best speech delivered in the Senate of the United States in his day. You never did a thing more timely, or which will be more warmly welcomed than this.” George S. Hillard, a friend of many years, but differing in position on political questions, wrote: “Your last brief speech on the Nebraska Bill is capital. I think it the best speech you have ever made. The mixture of dignity and spirit is most happy. We are going to fill up that region with free laborers, and secure it against

« ПретходнаНастави »