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Two days before it was begun :—
Adieu, Love, adieu, Love, untrue Love,
Untrue Love, untrue Love, adieu, Love;
Your mind is light, soon lost for new love.

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3.

LIV

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Self-proof in time will make thee know

He was a prophet told thee so;

A prophet that, Cassandra-like,
Tells truth without belief;

For headstrong Youth will run his race,
Although his goal be grief :

:

Love's Martyr, when his heat is past,
Proves Care's Confessor at the last.

Anon.

A RENUNCIATION

Thou art not fair, for all thy red and white,
For all those rosy ornaments in thee,-

Thou art not sweet, though made of mere delight,

Non fain

unless than niter mo!

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LV

I'll not be wrapp'd up in those arms of thine: -Now show it, if thou be a woman rightEmbrace and kiss and love me in despite !

T. Campic

6.

Blow, blow, thou winter wind,
Thou art not so unkind

As man's ingratitude;

Thy tooth is not so keen

Because thou art not seen,

Although thy breath be rude.

Heigh ho sing heigh ho! unto the green holly:
Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly:
Then, heigh ho! the holly!
This life is most jolly.

Freeze, freeze, thou bitter sky,
Thou dost not bite so nigh
As benefits forgot:

Though thou the waters warp,
Thy sting is not so sharp

As friend remember'd not.

Heigh ho! sing heigh ho! unto the green holly: Most friendship is feigning, most loving mere folly Then, heigh ho! the holly!

This life is most jolly.

A SWEET LULLABY

Come little babe, come silly soul,
Thy father's shame, thy mother's grief,
Born as I doubt to all our dole,
And to thy self unhappy chief :

Sing Lullaby and lap it warm,

W. Shakespea

I

The cause of this thy mother's moan,
Thou want'st the wit to wail her woe,
And I myself am all alone :

Why dost thou weep? why dost thou wail?
And knowest not yet what thou dost ail.

Come little wretch, ah silly heart,
Mine only joy, what can I more?
If there be any wrong thy smart
That may the destinies implore:

'Twas I, I say, against my will,
I wail the time, but be thou still.

And dost thou smile, oh thy sweet face!
Would God Himself He might thee see,
No doubt thou would'st soon purchase grace,
I know right well, for thee and me:

But come to mother, babe, and play,
For father false is fled away.

Sweet boy, if it by fortune chance,
Thy father home again to send,
If death do strike me with his lance,
Yet mayst thou me to him commend:

If any ask thy mother's name,

Tell how by love she purchased blame.

Then will his gentle heart soon yield,
I know him of a noble mind,
Although a Lion in the field,

A Lamb in town thou shalt him find :
Ask blessing, babe, be not afraid,
His sugar'd words hath me betray'd.

Then mayst thou joy and be right glad,
Although in woe I seem to moan,
Thy father is no rascal lad,

A noble youth of blood and bone :

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Will sit by thee and wail my fill;
God bless my babe, and lullaby
From this thy father's quality!

Anon

LVI

With how sad steps, O Moon, thou climb'st the skies!
How silently, and with how wan a face!
What, may it be that e'en in heavenly place
That busy archer his sharp arrows tries!

Sure, if that long-with-love-acquainted eyes
Can judge of love, thou feel'st a lover's case,
I read it in thy looks; thy languish'd grace,
To me, that feel the like, thy state descries.

Then, e'en of fellowship, O Moon, tell me,
Is constant love deem'd there but want of wit?
Are beauties there as proud as here they be?
Do they above love to be loved, and yet

Those lovers scorn whom that love doth possess?
Do they call virtue, there, ungratefulness?

O CRUDELIS AMOR

Sir P. Sidney

When thou must home to shades of underground,
And there arrived, a new admired guest,

The beauteous spirits do engirt thee round,
Vhite Iopé, blithe Helen, and the rest,
'o hear the stories of thy finish'd love

'rom that smooth tongue whose music hell can move ; 'hen wilt thou speak of banqueting delights,

f masques and revels which sweet youth did make,
f tourneys and great challenges of Knights,
nd all these triumphs for thy beauty's sake:
When thou hast told these honours done to thee,

L

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SEPHESTIA'S SONG TO HER CHILD

Weep not, my wanton, smile upon my knee;
When thou art old there's grief enough for thee.
Mother's wag, pretty boy,

Father's sorrow, father's joy;
When thy father first did see
Such a boy by him and me,
He was glad, I was woe,
Fortune changéd made him so,
When he left his pretty boy
Last his sorrow, first his joy.

Weep not, my wanton, smile upon my knee,
When thou art old there's grief enough for thee.
Streaming tears that never stint,
Like pearl drops from a flint,
Fell by course from his eyes,
That one another's place supplies;
Thus he grieved in every part,
Tears of blood fell from his heart,
When he left his pretty boy,
Father's sorrow, father's joy.

Weep not, my wanton, smile upon my knee,
When thou art old there's grief enough for thee.
The wanton smiled, father wept,
Mother cried, baby leapt ;

More he crow'd, more we cried,
Nature could not sorrow hide :
He must go, he must kiss
Child and mother, baby bless,
For he left his pretty boy,
Father's sorrow, father's joy.

Weep not, my wanton, smile upon my knee,
When thou art old there's grief enough for thee.

R. Greene

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