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placed at the intersection. Near the foot are the letters I.K., and at the base the following inscription :

JOHN KEBLE, VICAR OF HURSLEY, 1835-1866, FELL ASLEEP IN THE LORD,

MARCH 29, 1866, AGED 74 YEARS.

1

Upon a strip of brass around the edge of the stone into which the cross is laid are the following words of the Litany :

BY THINE AGONY AND BLOODY SWEAT fo BY THY CROSS AND PASSION | BY THY

PRECIOUS DEATH AND BURIAL . BY THY GLORIOUS RESURRECTION AND ASCEN

.

SION -- AND BY THE COMING OF THE HOLY GHOST * GOOD LORD DELIVER US.

(See the accompanying woodcut.)

The beautiful carved walnut-wood of the stalls, pulpit, lectern, and altar-rails, are well worthy of notice.

The coronæ and bracket, and standard candlesticks, are very elegant and well placed for lighting up the whole church.

The font-cover is remarkably handsome; it was presented anonymously about the year 1855, and is a great ornament to the south-west corner of the church.

The angels with shields carved in oak, forming the corbels of the roof, must also be noticed as being very beautiful, and reminding us of the words on “carved angels” in the Lyra Innocentium, p. 272 :—

“Haply some shield their arms embrace,

Rich with the Lord's own blazonry;

The cross of His redeeming grace,
Or His dread wounds, we there descry.

His standard-bearers they :
Learn we to face them on the dread procession day."

The font, lectern, altar-rails, and other fittings of the church, were presents from different persons.

On the front of the step at the entrance of the chancel the following sentence is inscribed by means of letters upon encaustic tiles :

BLESSED ARE THEY THAT DO HIS COMMANDMENTS, THAT THEY MAY HAVE RIGHT

TO THE TREE OF LIFE, AND ENTER THROUGH THE GATES INTO THE CITY,

On the front of the step upon which the altar-rails are placed are the words :

BLESSED ARE THEY WHICH DO HUNGER AND THIRST AFTER RIGHTEOUSNESS :

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And on the last step, upon which the altar is placed :

THINE EYES SHALL SEE THE KING IN HIS BEAUTY ; THEY SHALL BEHOLD

THE LAND THAT IS VERY FAR OFF.

"By these steps the ascent of virtues is sufficiently made manifest, by which we go up to the Altar, that is, to Christ : according to that saying of the Psalmist, “They go from virtue to Virtue.'”Durandus, “On the Symbolism of Churches and Church Ornaments,” (Rivington, 1843,) p.49.

The church was consecrated (or it might perhaps be more correctly said re-consecrated) by the Lord Bishop of Winchester, on Tuesday the 24th of October, 1848, in the presence of a large congregation, including about seventy clergy, amongst whom were the Dean and Archdeacon of Winchester, the Wardens of New College and Winchester College, Canons Noel, Hamilton, and Bartholomew, and many from a distance. At the same time a new piece was added to the churchyard, which was further enlarged in the autumn of 1865, by grants of land from the Patron and the Vicar.

The painted windows were not ready for the church on the day of its consecration, but had to be erected afterwards.

In the churchyard there are many stately lime-trees, which are supposed to have been planted there by Richard Cromwell, who lived at Hursley Park, and lies buried in the chancel of the church, together with many of his family, as we find recorded on a mural monument which is now inside the south wall of the tower, having been removed to that place from the chancel on the rebuilding of the church.

“And even the very walls of the dread place,

And the tall windows with their breathing lights
Speak to the adoring heart and say, No base
Or week-day garb may him beseem who writes
God's message here in hearts of men,-invites
To the bright nuptial feast of joy and grace."

(Lyra Innocentium, p. 279.)

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