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A Sermon in St. Barnabas; Consecration Volume.
Articles in “ British Critic," on Warburton's Remains and Life of Sir Walter Scott.
Article in “Christian Remembrancer" on the Synod of Exeter. 1850.
Article in “Christian Remembrancer” on Monro's “ Parochial Work.” 1850.
Considerations suggested by a late Pastoral Letter. Edinburgh, 1858.

Editor's Preface to the Works of Hooker, two editions (108 pages, Svo.) Oxford University Press, 1841.

Volume of Sermons: two editions, with long preface. 1847.
“ Plain Sermons," Vols. VI. and VIII. 1846.
Heads of Consideration (about Mr. Ward). 1845.
Duty of Hoping against Hope. 1846.
On Translation from Dead Languages. 1812.
On “ Eucharistical Adoration.” Three editions. 1857.
An Argument against the Divorce Bill. 1857.
Sequel to Argument. 1857.
Letter to Sir Brook Bridges. 1852.
On Admission of Dissenters. 1854.
Rich and Poor one in Christ. 1858.
Easter-Day Sermon.
Against Profane Dealing with Holy Matrimony.
Life of Bishop Wilson. 1863.

Three Sermons in St. Saviour's, Leeds : Consecration Volume, Nos. 4, 5, and 6. Parker. 1845.

Sundry Plain Sermons.
Sermon at Jedburgh. 1845.

“The Strength of Christ's Little Ones" a Sermon preached at Coggershall. Three editions. Masters, 1849.

Lyra Innocentium. 1846.
Address to Communicants on the subject of Holy Baptism.

Many Letters in the “Guardian” Newspaper.
Sundry Addresses to Parishioners.
A Letter about the Proposed Re-election of Sir Robert Peel.
The Oxford Psalter.
An Article on Miller's Bampton Lectures.
“Women Labouring in the Lord :” a Sermon preached at Wantage.
“A Litany of our Lord's Warnings.” 1864.
“ Pentecostal Fear:” a Sermon preached at Cuddesdon. 1864.
Address to the newly Confirmed at Hursley, March 28. 1865.
Prælectiones Academicæ.
Considerations on the Most Holy Eucharist.
Church Matters in 1850, in two Numbers.
Pastoral Letter to the Parishioners of Hursley. 1851.
Catholic Subscription to the Thirty-nine Articles. 1841.
Many unpublished Poems, &c.
“Seed Time and Harvest :” a Sermon. 1864.

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All the most important of the above were published by Messrs. Parker, Oxford and London, of whom the greater part of them may be procured.

“Servant of God, farewell ! Be ours to trace

The reflex image of thine every grace,
And treasure, as a sacred heritage,
Each line inscribed upon thy life's fair page.”

(Kilvert's Remains, p. 31.)

THE PETITION OF THE WILD FLOWERS.

.

A POEM BY THE REV. JOHN KEBLE.

HIS characteristic Poem has been mentioned in the foregoing

Memoir as having been composed by the Author of “The

Christian Year,” and addressed to Sir William Heathcote, with special reference to certain alterations proposed to be made by the Baronet, near the picturesque hamlet of Ladwell, which were not accordant with the poetic taste of the Vicar. The verses seem to harmonize well with a saying of the Author of them, that he wished that those persons who grubbed old hedgerows and substituted straight fences "might never hear a Nightingale, see an Anemone, nor smell a Violet.” They strongly mark his love for the beauties of nature, and his great dislike of straight dead fences, which (with pleasant humour) he said that the Winchester boys did well in destroying.

In these pretty verses the Poet speaks in the name of the Wild Flowers in which he delighted, and of which he had much knowledge. He always looked with true pleasure at the poetry shewn in the works of Creation. The Bishop of Brechin has truly said of him :-“ His love of nature came out in much that he said. I recollect his taking up a fern-leaf, and, as he pointed out the regularity of the fronds, he said, It is such perfect music.' The Park at Hursley and the forest-land beyond it were sources of unceasing delight to him ?." He once composed a sonnet on “Spring Flowers,” beginning with the words :

“ The loveliest flowers the closest cling to earth,

And they first feel the sun 6:”

shewing how he noticed and loved the humble flowers of the fields and hedges, and could draw from them holy lessons of great Christian virtues. The Poem here given is of a more playful character.

Special thanks are respectfully and gratefully tendered to the Rev. THOMAS KEBLE, Jun., for kindly permitting this beautiful little Poem to be published here with the accompanying illustrations.

“The Church Magazine for the Diocese of Brechin,” 1866. No. vii. • Published some time ago in “The Casket.”

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TO THE LORD OF THE MANOR OF

MERD ON:

THE PETITION OF SUNDRY LIFE-TENANTS, OR HEREDITARY

DENIZENS OF THE SAID MANOR,

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