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By Mr. BROOKS of Louisiana:

H. R. 9843. A bill to provide that peacetime espionage may be punished by death, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Armed Services.

By Mr. FULTON:

H. J. Res. 559. Joint resolution to authorize the return of former German property, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

By Mr. SHEEHAN:

H. Res. 621. Resolution proposing the withdrawal of diplomatic recognition of the present Government of the Polish Peoples Republic; to the Committee on Foreign Affairs.

PRIVATE BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

Under clause 1 of rule XXII, private bills and resolutions were introduced and severally referred as follows:

By Mr. AUCHINCLOSS:

H. R. 9844. A bill for the relief of Gabriella Sardo; to the Committee on the Judiciary. By Mr. BARTLETT:

H. R. 9845. A bill to provide preference right to certain land in Alaska to Bert Arthur Paraday of Anchor Point, Alaska, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

H. R. 9846. A bill to provide preference right to certain land in Alaska to Carl E. Robinson of Anchor Point, Alaska, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

H. R. 9847. A bill to provide preference right to certain land in Alaska to Joseph Booth of Anchorage, Alaska, and for other

purposes; to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

H. R. 9848. A bill to provide preference right to certain land in Alaska to Robert Henry Soyk of Kenai, Alaska, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

By Mr. GUBSER:

H. R. 9849. A bill for the relief of the Martin Wunderlich Co.; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. HORAN:

H. R. 9850. A bill to authorize the award of a medal to Clyde Pangborn and Hugh Herndon, Jr.; to the Committee on Banking and Currency.

By Mr. HUNTER:

H. R. 9851. A bill for the relief of Mrs. Irene Reyzev; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. O'BRIEN of New York:

H. R. 9852. A bill for the relief of Giovanni M. Di Virgilio; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

H. R. 9853. A bill for the relief of Karlis Abele; to the Committee on the Judiciary. By Mr. SIMPSON of Illinois:

H. R. 9854. A bill for the relief of Vasilios Demetriou Kretsos and his wife, Chryssa Thomaidou Kretsos; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. STRINGFELLOW:

H. R. 9855. A bill for the relief of Zelpha H. Sessions; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. WALTER:

H. R. 9856. A bill for the relief of John Odabashian, M. D.; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

H. R. 9857. A bill for the relief of Maria Englesis; to the Committee on the Judiciary. By Mr. WILSON of California: H. R. 9858. A bill for the relief of Abdul Haleem; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

PETITIONS, ETC.

Under clause 1 of rule XXII, petitions and papers were laid on the Clerk's desk and referred as follows:

1088. By Mr. CRETELLA: Petition of Mrs. Beth Kooman and others, of New Haven County, Conn., favoring the Bryson bill (H. R. 1227); to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

1089. By Mr. NEAL: Petition of a number of citizens of Huntington, W. Va., and the adjoining areas relative to S. 2515, affecting the American Indians; to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

1090. By Mr. PHILBIN: Petition of Esther L. Woods and others of the Women's Christian Temperance Union, Leominster, Mass., urging passage of the Bryson bill, H. R. 1227; to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

1091. Also, petition of Winfred E. Baker and others of the Congregational Church of Christ, North Leominster, Mass., urging passage of legislation to prohibit alcoholic beverage advertising over the radio and television and in newspapers and magazines; to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign

Commerce.

The Green River Valley Development Program

EXTENSION OF REMARKS

OF

HON. WILLIAM H. NATCHER

OF KENTUCKY

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, July 8, 1954

EXTENSIONS OF REMARKS

Mr. NATCHER. Mr. Speaker, today the Owensboro Inquirer, of Owensboro, Ky.; the Owensboro Messenger, Owensboro, Ky.; the Park City Daily News, of Bowling Green, Ky.; the McLean County News, of Calhoun, Ky.; the Henderson Gleaner and Journal, of

Henderson, Ky.; the Sebree Banner, of Sebree, Ky.; the Messenger, of Central City, Ky.; the Greenville Leader, of Greenville, Ky.; the Green River Republican, of Morgantown, Ky.; the TimesArgus, of Central City, Ky.; the Ohio County Messenger, of Beaver Dam, Ky.; the Ohio County News, of Hartford, Ky.; jointly published "the Green River Valley Celebration Special." The editors of the above-enumerated newspapers in an editorial carried in the masthead of this special celebration edition, stated as follows:

In collaboration with the Green River Valley Citizens League, Inc., this special is in gratitude and recognition of action by the national administration and the Congress to initiate the first project (lower Green navigation) of the overall three-pronged Green River Valley development program. More importantly, this special is to accentuate the

fact that the Federal Government is now generating and will increasingly generate huge blocks of coal-steam electricity at costs far greater than possible in the Green River Valley-if and when we obtain flood control water storage as provided in other valleys to eliminate costly cooling towers and related facilities. Without this regulated water supply from proposed reservoirs the Green River Valley will not be industrialized and the entire valley will continue as a vast chronic labor surplus area. The benefits of flood control to bottom-land farmers will be tremendous. Essential also is modernized navigation in the upper valley and the minor watershed projects by the Department of Agriculture must be continued and expanded. This issue is factual and the various authors are prepared to support their presentations under oath with ample proof.

The Green River Valley Citizens League, Inc., was organized at Central City, Ky., on September 28, 1951. James R. Hines, of Bowling Green, is the president of this organization; Albert P. Harding, of Central City, is executive vice president and secretary; J. Morton Williams, of Beaver Dam, is the treasurer, and the honorary president is C. A. Reis, of South Carrollton, Ky. The board of directors is composed of James R. Hines, Albert P. Harding, J. Morton Williams, W. C. Sumpter, Fred E. Massey, R. A. Demunbrun, Dr. W. H. Washburn, John Q. Adams, Homer Boyd, I. G. Reynierson, Landon Wills, Chester A. Hope, Edward Delker, James Hayes, W. A. Moore, J. E. Wood, Roy Morton, J. T. Turner, Byron Royster, Harry Wheeldon, and Harry Scott.

Due to the combined efforts of the outstanding newspapers hereinabove listed,

and the Green River Valley Citizens League, Inc., development of the Green River Valley in Kentucky has finally started. The citizens of the Green River Valley appreciate the efforts of the Congress of the United States, and I only wish it were possible for me to include all of the articles carried in the Green River Valley Celebration Special praising the Congress of the United States, the Commonwealth of Kentucky, and all of those who have assisted in the development of the Green River Valley.

Mr. Speaker, under leave to extend my remarks in the RECORD, I include herewith an article written by the Honorable James R. Hines, of Bowling Green, Ky., the president of the Green River Valley Citizens League, Inc., which is a part of the Green River Valley Celebration Special, with same entitled "Current Congress Can Spare $800,000 for Valley."

The article is as follows:

CURRENT CONGRESS CAN SPARE $800,000 FOR VALLEY

(By James R. Hines, Bowling Green, Ky., league president)

Is there any good reason why the current session of the Congress should not vote a lump sum of $200,000 for fiscal 1955 starting next July 1 to initiate construction of Rough, Nolin, Green, and Barren Reservoirs as a single project? After showing how Uncle Sam is actually losing money day in and day out by the lack of these projects, Honorary President Reis of the league in another article herein asks similar questions which to me are the most important now that lower navigation modernization is under way.

This takes the writer back to the very embarrassing position in which he was placed in February 1953 when the Louisville district engineer in his report on the overall project stated: "The cost of the improvement (above Green River mile 103) would be in excess of the benefits to be realized." Nothing could be more damaging to the efforts of the Green River Valley Citizens League, Inc., in my hometown of Bowling Green located at the head of navigation on Barren River. This needs early correction and I am sure

that with this understanding of my personal

position Senator COOPER-with the fine cooperation he has had from Senator CLEMENTS, Congressman GREGORY, and Congressman NATCHER and will continue to have-can without any question obtain the aforesaid $200,000 for the purposes stated before this Congress adjourns.

Even so this further favor to the Green River Valley will not match the so-called Green River 5-year plan adopted by our league officers in November 1953, as follows: Lower Green River navigation

reconstruction

Rough River Reservoir_
Nolin River Reservoir___
No. 2 Green River Reservoir__
No. 2 Barren River Reservoir___
Upper Green River new locks 3
and 4.

U. S. Department of Agriculture subwatershed project--‒‒‒‒

Total over 5 years, averaging $122 million yearly

$17,000,000

7, 600, 000 12, 840,000 7, 175, 000 18, 460, 000

500,000

63,575,000

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It is my understanding that the Mexicans are paid on the basis of 50 cents an hour. The local labor, most of whom, as I have said, are Negroes, being paid on the basis of 30 cents an hour. It is impossible to understand this discrimination.

Of course, I do not feel that 50 cents an hour is too high. I do not think it is, but I think the local laborers should be I shall request the Department of Labor paid the same scale as the Mexicans and to investigate and see that this situation is remedied and that our local labor is treated fairly.

Reciprocal Trade-Oklahoma With Arizona

EXTENSION OF REMARKS

OF

HON. VICTOR WICKERSHAM

OF OKLAHOMA

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, July 8, 1954

Mr. WICKERSHAM. Mr. Speaker, a week ago I addressed the House of Representatives on the subject of Oklahoma-My Home.

What I had to say then had to do with headlines in the press which blazoned, "Film Musical Oklahoma To Be Made In Arizona." In this talk, I noted the decision of producer Arthur Hornblower to put his company on location in Arizona

because, in his own words:

It (Oklahoma) doesn't look enough like

Funds for planning and designing No. 2 the Oklahoma of 1907 any more. It has too Barren River Reservoir.

Funds to continue USDA North Fork Rough River subwatershed project.

Funds to continue USDA Lincoln-Casey Counties subwatershed project.

In other words we have fallen far short of the $122 million average this year because $800,000 and $4,800,000 has been appropriated for fiscal 1954 and 1955, respectively, plus the two small amounts for the USDA projects.

Wage Scale Discrimination in the Memphis, Tenn.-Ark., Area

EXTENSION OF REMARKS

OF

HON. B. CARROLL REECE

OF TENNESSEE

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, July 8, 1954

Mr. REECE of Tennessee. Mr. Speaker, a labor situation has developed in the Memphis, Tenn.-Ark., area that should have immediate attention by the appropriate authorities.

This is a cotton area, where large numbers of unskilled laborers are employed. There has been importation of Mexican labor under the Migratory Labor Act, as cotton choppers and pickers, and other types of work in connection with the planting and growing of cotton. There is also employed a large number of local citizens, most of whom are Negroes.

many oil wells, airplanes, and people.

In the opinion of many, my reasoning completely demolished the Hornblower argument.

The Hornblower incident is only one in a series of incidents in which Hollywood has told both the States and the United

States "where to head in."

I

I propose to reverse this process. propose to give some suggestions to Hollywood from Washington.

Scores of Hollywood stars have portrayed Congressmen, Congresswomen, and Senators. Other scores of Hollywood stars have taken the roles of Presidents. President Andrew Jackson has been a favorite film subject. President Truman was a voice on the screen in Call Me Madame. Actor-producerdirector Robert Montgomery gives advice to President Eisenhower.

It is not amiss, therefore, for me to give advice to Mr. Hornblower.

Back in 1899, the great playwright, Augustus Thomas, wrote a stage play. One of the young actors who was a member of the original cast of the Chicago premiere of that play was Mr. Lionel Barrymore who took the part of Lieutenant Young, 11th United States Cavalry.

The name of that play was Arizona. My advice to producer Hornblower is that he should reissue the play Arizona as a motion picture.

My further advice to Mr. Hornblower is that he should pass up the State of Arizona as a site for filming this pro

duction; and that he, instead, choose my State, Oklahoma.

My reasons? Arizona doesn't look enough like the Arizona of 1899. It has too many cities, too much irrigation, and not enough cactus.

Such a step would be true reciprocity. The Oklahoma and Arizona delegations in Congress would be satisfied. Perhaps, it would even meet the approval of the tions. Committee on Intergovernmental Rela

Mr. Speaker, if Hollywood can whimsically produce Oklahoma in Arizona, I see no possible objection to Hollywood's further exercising its whim by producing Arizona in Oklahoma.

Foreign Service Academy-Part II

EXTENSION OF REMARKS

OF

HON. CLEMENT J. ZABLOCKI

OF WISCONSIN

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, July 8, 1954

Mr. ZABLOCKI. Mr. Speaker, under leave to extend my remarks in the RECORD, granted on June 28, I spoke about the personnel problem in our State Department.

At that time, I pointed out that the interests of our Nation could best be served by the adoption of sweeping changes in the Department. In the first place, steps ought to be taken to provide a reservoir of able, specially trained young men and women who would eventually serve our Government in various positions abroad. Secondly, the personnel structure within the Department of State should be overhauled, so as to do away with the causes of low morale and with poor utilization of human resources.

I had already discussed my proposal for the establishment of a Foreign Service Academy of the United States, contained in my bill, H. R. 1870. This proposal, when adopted by Congress, should provide the State Department and other executive departments and agencies witn adequate specialized personnel for oversea work.

Wriston report for the overhauling of Today, in commenting further on the the personnel structure of the State Department, I should like to call to the attention of the membership of this body two editorials from the Milwaukee Journal, both having a bearing on this subject.

The first editorial is entitled "Bad Morale in Courier Service" and it ap

peared in the Milwaukee Journal of June 28, 1954. It demonstrates why State Department morale is as low as it is. It warrants our earnest consideration, because we cannot expect our Foreign Service to be efficient and effective while

we close our eyes to the many causes which undermine its morale. The editorial follows:

BAD MORALE IN COURIER SERVICE We had a letter the other day from a friend who is a diplomatic courier in the American Foreign Service. Because of what the State Department's economy drive is doing to him

and to the courier service, he is an unhappy young man.

Diplomatic couriers carry our country's vital documents between 110 United States diplomatic missions around the world. They cover four continents from regional offices at Paris, Cairo, Manila, and Panama. Today they travel almost exclusively by air. The courier travels far, sees strange places and has an occasional adventure. By and large, however, the job is arduous, exacting, occasionally dangerous and often monotonous.

When our friend joined the couriers in 1952 there were 100 men in the service. Schedules generally called for trips of 2 or 3 days, with the rest of the workweek in the regional office. Under such schedules, it was possible to make allowance for bad flying weather and airplane mechanical troubles. The couriers, many of whom are married, were reasonably assured of some time at home.

Since the Eisenhower administration came in, the courier force has been cut from 100 men to 66. On July 1 it will go down to 60. Inasmuch as the same number of missions must still be visited and the same number of miles flown, this means that 60 men must cover the routes and do the work that 100 previously did.

The letter from our courier friend explains what this means:

"I'm abashed for not having written sooner. However, the reduction in force of couriers has weighed heavily on our office. I've had just about time to drop off my laundry and pick up some clean clothes between trips. I've almost forgotten what the apartment looks like. Jane has a few thousand well-chosen and rehearsed words to say about the setup whenever we chance to meet. All we can do is hope that the pressure lets up soon. If not, most of us in this office are going to quit."

Courier morale is low for two other reasons. Most couriers, young men just out of college, joined the service with the expectation that they could, in reasonable time, move up into the regular Foreign Service. They have recently been given to understand that, in view of overall reduction in the foreign staff, there is little chance of such promotion for a long time.

Couriers were also given to understand, when they joined the service, that they would get home leave after 2 years. Last winter they received notice that, for economy reasons, there would be no home leave until after 3 years of service.

All in all, we can't blame our friend for being unhappy. And it is easy to understand why morale in the courier service is bad. Maybe one of the congressional committees concerned with such matters should check into what looks like another example of false economy.

Mr. Speaker, the second editorial, taken from the Milwaukee Journal of June 29, 1954, lists the highlights of the Wriston report, stressing the fact that our Nation badly needs great improvements in the selection, recruitment, and assignment or utilization of the men and women who execute our foreign policy both at home and abroad. It is entitled "More and Better Men Are Needed for Foreign Service," and I commend it highly to my colleagues' attention: MORE AND BETTER MEN ARE NEEDED FOR FOREIGN SERVICE

The United States badly needs more and better men making its foreign policy at home and representing it in the 68 embassies, 9 legations, and 167 consulates abroad. And it needs to use these men to better advantage than it is using its present diplomats.

This is about what the Wriston committee's recommendations to the State Department about administrative reform add up to.

There is not much new about its recommendations. Similar ones were made after World War II by the late Secretary Stettinius and later by the first Hoover Commission. Little came from them. As one commentator has said of the Stettinius reform: "The principal feature was the transfer of attendants from the corridors to the washrooms."

This time, however, there seems some to hope something will happen. Secretary Dulles has approved many of the

reason

committee recommendations and ordered them into effect.

Here are highlights of the Wriston committee's administrative reform program:

Personnel in the Foreign Service should be increased from 1,285 to 3,900. This should be done primarily by integrating into the Foreign Service the top personnel of the State Department's civil-service organization in Washington.

The Foreign Service must open its ranks to a large number of people with a high degree of specialization in other than the general practice of diplomacy.

The situation under which the Foreign Service is in effect a condition of exile abroad must be ended. Officers must be brought home for duty regularly to keep their knowledge of American life steadily refreshed.

A modern personnel system must be established under a Deputy Under Secretary of State who will enter the job prepared to stay. A promotion system should be set up.

The Foreign Service Institute should be revitalized to carry out its purpose-to train diplomatic officers as the war colleges train military officers.

Foreign Service recruitment of young men must be stepped up through cooperation with colleges and universities and by accelerating present examination processes and security procedures. For the long range, a nationwide scholarship training program, patterned after the Navy's contract system for its Reserve Officer Training Corps, is urged.

All of these recommendations are worthy. We surmise, however, that it is going to take more than worthiness, and even Secretary Dulles' approval, to bring them to realization. In view of what has happened to equally good recommendations in the past, we think there must be continuing pressure by Mr. Dulles, vigorous administrative action, plus some outside prodding by the Wriston Commission and interested Members of the Congress and the public.

And most important of all, perhaps, there must be improvement of morale inside the Foreign Service and the State Department. The Wriston committee has recognized that this is very low and has suggested how to improve it. Discussion of the morale situation will follow in another editorial.

SENATE

FRIDAY, JULY 9, 1954

(Legislative day of Friday, July 2, 1954)

The Senate met at 12 o'clock meridian, on the expiration of the recess.

The Chaplain, Rev. Frederick Brown Harris, D. D., offered the following prayer:

O God, who art the foundation of the true and good, the secret and source of all grace and strength: We thank Thee for beauty found in unexpected places, blossoms of joy that grow in dusty ways, flowers of hope that spring in the desert, and for high moments of prayer that reveal to us even fleeting glimpses of the splendors of eternity. By the good will that finds a home in our own hearts, fit us to be among those who in these disruptive days tear down barriers of suspicion and hostility and build bridges of friendliness. May we never forget that righteousness exalts a nation, and that only the pure in heart can see Thee and the Godlike in a world where common bushes burn with the eternal, but where only those who see take off their shoes.

We pray that Thou wilt give persuasive power to all statesmen, writers, and public leaders who hold before the people ideals of truth and beauty. In these perilous days, when pagan blackness battles against the light, may we know in very truth that it is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness. We ask it in the ever-blessed name of that One who is the light of the world. Amen.

THE JOURNAL

On request of Mr. KNOWLAND, and by unanimous consent, the reading of the Journal of the proceedings of Thursday, July 8, 1954, was dispensed with.

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

A message in writing from the President of the United States, withdrawing the nomination of Leland H. Goddard to be postmaster at Key West, Fla., was communicated to the Senate by Mr. Hawks, one of his secretaries.

MESSAGE FROM THE HOUSE A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Bartlett, one of its

clerks, announced that the House had passed the bill (S. 3605) to abolish the offices of Assistant Treasurer and Assistant Register of the Treasury and to provide for an Under Secretary for Monetary Affairs and an additional Assistant Secretary in the Treasury Department, with amendments, in which it requested the concurrence of the Senate.

The message also announced that the House had passed the following bills, in which it requested the concurrence of the Senate:

H. R. 179. An act to amend section 7. of the Administrative Expenses Act of 1946, as amended;

H. R. 8020. An act authorizing the transfer of certain property of the United States Government (in Klamath Falls, Oreg.) to the State of Oregon;

H. R. 9580. An act to revise and extend the laws relating to espionage and sabotage, and for other purposes; and

H. R. 9709. An act to extend and improve the unemployment compensation program.

COMMITTEE SERVICE

On motion of Mr. KNOWLAND, and by unanimous consent, it was

Ordered, That the Senator from Oregon [Mr. CORDON] be, and he is hereby, appointed

as chairman of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs;

That the Senator from Wyoming [Mr. CRIPPA] be, and he is hereby, excused from further service as a member of the Committee on the District of Columbia and is assigned to service on the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs; and

That the Senator from Nebraska [Mr. REYNOLDS] be, and he is hereby, assigned to service on the Committee on Finance and the Committee on the District of Columbia.

ORDER FOR TRANSACTION OF
ROUTINE BUSINESS

Mr. KNOWLAND. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that following a brief executive session and a quorum call there may be the customary morning hour for the transaction of routine business, under the usual 2-minute limitation on speeches.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Without objection, it is so ordered.

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Mr. KNOWLAND. Mr. President, I move that the Senate proceed to the consideration of executive business, for action on the nominations on the Executive Calendar which appear under the heading "New Reports."

The motion was agreed to; and the Senate proceeded to the consideration of executive business.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. If there be no reports of committees, the clerk will state the nominations on the Executive Calendar under the heading "New Reports."

FEDERAL COAL MINE SAFETY
BOARD OF REVIEW

The Chief Clerk read the nomination of Charles R. Ferguson, of Pennsylvania, to be a member of the Federal Coal Mine Safety Board of Review.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Without objection, the nomination is confirmed.

IN THE ARMY

The Chief Clerk read the nomination of Maj. Gen. Earle Standlee to be a major general in the Medical Corps.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Without objection, the nomination is confirmed.

The Chief Clerk read the nomination of Brig. Gen. Paul Irwin Robinson to be a brigadier general in the Medical Corps. The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Without objection, the nomination is confirmed.

Mr. KNOWLAND. Mr. President, I ask that the President be immediately notified of the confirmations of today.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. With out objection, the President will be immediately notified.

NOMINATION OF HERBERT BERNARD LOPER TO BE CHAIRMAN OF THE MILITARY LIAISON COMMITTEE TO THE ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION-NOTICE OF HEAR

ING

Mr. HICKENLOOPER. Mr. President, I give notice for the record at this

time that on next Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock the Senate members of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy will meet for an open hearing on the question of the confirmation of the nomination of Herbert Bernard Loper, of Nebraska, to be chairman of the Military Liaison Committee to the Atomic Energy Commission. The room will be announced at a later date.

I further ask unanimous consent that the members on the part of the Senate of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy be authorized to meet on Monday afternoon.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Without objection, it is so ordered.

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Pastore
Payne

Potter

Reynolds
Robertson
Russell

Saltonstall

Schoeppel
Smathers
Smith, Maine
Smith, N. J.
Sparkman
Stennis
Symington
Thye
Upton
Watkins
Welker
Williams
Young

I announce

Mr. SALTONSTALL. that the Senator from Maryland [Mr. BEALL], the Senator from Indiana [Mr. JENNER], the Senator from Connecticut [Mr. PURTELL], and the senior Senator from Wisconsin [Mr. WILEY] are necessarily absent.

The junior Senator from Wisconsin [Mr. MCCARTHY] is absent on official business.

Mr. CLEMENTS. I announce that the Senator from Mississippi [Mr. EASTLAND], the Senators from Tennessee [Mr. GORE and Mr. KEFAUVER], the Senator from Missouri [Mr. HENNINGS], and the Senator from Arkansas [Mr. MCCLELLAN] are absent on official business.

The Senator from Florida [Mr. HOLLAND] is absent by leave of the Senate, attending the Sixth Annual Pan American Highway Congress at Caracas, Venezuela.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. A quorum is present.

Routine business is now in order.

EXECUTIVE COMMUNICATIONS, ETC.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate the following letters, which were referred as indicated: AMENDMENT OF CAREER COMPENSATION ACT RELATING TO CREDIT FOR CERTAIN SERVICE

A letter from the Acting Secretary of the Army, transmitting a draft of proposed legislation to amend the Career Compensation Act of 1949, as amended, to allow credit for certain service for purposes of pay, and for other purposes (with accompanying papers); to the Committee on Armed Services. PROPOSED AWARD OF CONCESSION CONTRACT, ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK, COLO. A letter from the Assistant Secretary of the Interior, transmitting, pursuant to law, a proposed award of a concession contract to operate a lodge and related facilities in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colo. (with accompanying papers); to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs. AUDIT REPORT ON FARM CREDIT AMINISTRATION, ETC.

A letter from the Acting Comptroller General of the United States, transmitting, pursuant to law, an audit report on Farm Credit Administration, certain corporations supervised by Farm Credit Administration, and the Agricultural Marketing Revolving Fund administered by Farm Credit Administration, for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1953 (with an accompanying report); to the Committee on Government Operations.

SESSIONS LAWS OF HAWAII, 1953

A letter from the Secretary of Hawaii, transmitting, pursuant to law, a copy of the Session Laws of Hawaii, 1953, as enacted by the Legislature of the Territory of Hawaii (with an accompanying document); to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

PETITIONS AND MEMORIALS Petitions, etc., were laid before the Senate, and referred as indicated:

By the PRESIDENT pro tempore: A resolution adopted by the Board of Supervisors of Erie County, Buffalo, N. Y., favoring the enactment of legislation to provide adequate funds for the expansion of port facilities for the port of Buffalo, N. Y.; to the Committee on Public Works.

The petition of Terry Mulhall, of Sioux City, Iowa, relating to the withdrawal of the United States from the United Nations if Red China is admitted as a member of the United Nations; to the Committee on Foreign Relations.

By Mr. ELLENDER:

A concurrent resolution of the Legislature of the State of Louisiana; to the Committee on the Judiciary:

"Senate Concurrent Resolution 15 "Whereas at the session of the Legislature of Louisiana held in 1950 House Concurrent Resolution 24 was passed to memorialize and petition the Congress of the United States to call a convention for the purpose of considering an amendment to the Constitution of the United States relative to taxes on incomes, inheritance, and gifts; and

"Whereas eight States which so memorialized the Congress to call the above-mentioned convention to consider an amendment to the Constitution of the United States relative to taxes on incomes, inheritance, and gifts, have since rescinded their action; and

"Whereas it is desirable that the Legislature of the State of Louisiana give serious reconsideration to its action evidenced by

House Concurrent Resolution 24 of 1950, in the light of present local, national, and international conditions: Therefore be it

"Resolved by the Senate of the State of Louisiana (the House of Representatives concurring), That the action of the presiding officers in signing House Concurrent Resolution 24 of 1950, is hereby rescinded; and be it further

"Resolved, That a duly attested copy of this resolution be immediately transmitted to the Secretary of the Senate of the United States, the Clerk of the House of Representatives of the United States, and to each Member of the United States Congress from this State.

"All rules of the senate and of the house in conflict herewith are hereby suspended for the limited purposes set forth in this resolution.

"C. E. BARHAM, "Lieutenant Governor and President of the Senate.

"C. C. AYCOCK, "Speaker of the House of Representatives."

A concurrent resolution of the Legislature of the State of Louisiana; to the Committee on Finance:

"Senate Concurrent Resolution 19 "Whereas the security of the United States in these troubled times rests as fully upon our economic strength as upon our strength of arms; and

"Whereas the economy of the State of Louisiana is basically agricultural and the sugar industry is one of the most important industries in the State; and

"Whereas the Federal Government has set a quota on the amount of sugar that may be produced in the State of Louisiana which has resulted in a loss of revenues for the sugar producers of the State; and

"Whereas sugar has not been given the price raises similar to those afforded to other agricultural commodities; and

"Whereas the continued subnormal price of sugar will seriously impair the welfare of the industry; and

"Whereas a raise in the price of sugar will grant the relief which the industry needs, and will make possible a corresponding raise in the wages of employees in the industry: Therefore be it

"Resolved by the Senate of the State of Louisiana (the House of Representatives concurring), That the Secretary of Agriculture of the United States and the Congress of the United States are hereby memorialized and requested to take such action as is necessary to raise the price of sugar; be it further

"Resolved, That the Senators and Representatives from the State of Louisiana now serving in the Congress of the United States are hereby respectfully requested to exert every effort and utilize all facilities at their command to further said action; be it further

"Resolved, That copies of this resolution shall forthwith be transmitted to the Secretary of Agriculture of the United States, to the presiding officer of each House of the Congress, and to each Senator and Representative from Louisiana.

"C. E. BARHAM, "Lieutenant Governor and President of the Senate. "C. C. AYCOCK, "Speaker of the House of Representatives."

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES

tain the Talent division of the Rogue River Basin reclamation project, Oregon; with amendments (Rept. No. 1760).

By Mr. MALONE, from the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs:

S. Res. 271. Resolution providing for an investigation of critical raw materials by the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs; without amendment.

By Mr. DANIEL, from the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs:

S. 3699. A bill granting the consent of Congress to a compact entered into by the States of Louisiana and Texas and relating to the waters of the Sabine River; without amendment (Rept. No. 1783).

By Mr. BUSH, from the Committee on Public Works:

H. R. 7815. A bill to provide for the construction, operation, and maintenance of the Cougar Dam and Reservoir on the South Fork McKenzie River, Oreg., with participation for power by the city of Eugene, Oreg.; without amendment (Rept. No. 1761).

By Mr. CASE, from the Committee on the District of Columbia, without amendment: H. R. 7132. A bill to exempt from taxation certain property of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States in the District of Columbia (Rept. No. 1766).

By Mr. BEALL, from the Committee on the District of Columbia, without amendment:

S. 3506. A bill to repeal the act approved September 25, 1914, and to amend the act approved June 12, 1934, both relating to alley dwellings in the District of Columbia (Rept. No. 1762).

By Mr. BEALL, from the Committee on the District of Columbia, with amendments: S. 1585. A bill to amend the District of Columbia Traffic Act, 1925, as amended (Rept. No. 1763);

S. 2655. A bill to amend the District of Columbia Teachers' Salary Act of 1947, as amended (Rept. No. 1764); and

S. 3482. A bill to amend the District of Columbia Unemployment Compensation Act, and for other purposes (Rept. No. 1765).

By Mr. PAYNE, from the Committee on the District of Columbia, without amendment:

H. R. 8692. A bill to permit the payment of certain trust accounts to the beneficiary on the death of the trustee by savings and loan, and similar associations in the District of Columbia (Rept. No. 1767);

H. R. 8973. A bill to amend paragraph 31 of section 7 of the act entitled "An act making appropriations to provide for the government of the District of Columbia for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1903, and for other purposes," approved July 1, 1902, as amended (Rept. No. 1768); and

H. R. 8974. A bill to permit investment of funds of insurance companies organized within the District of Columbia in obligations of the International Bank for Recon

struction and Development (Rept. No. 1769). By Mr. PAYNE, from the Committee on the District of Columbia, with amendments:

S. 880. A bill to amend the license law of the District of Columbia (Rept. No. 1770). By Mr. CRIPPA, from the Committee on the District of Columbia, without amendment:

S. 2686. A bill to amend the act entitled "An act to control the possession, sale, transfer, and use of pistols and other dangerous weapons in the District of Columbia, to provide penalties, to prescribe rules of evidence, and for other purposes," approved July 8, 1932 (Rept. No. 1772);

S. 2687. A bill to authorize the Commissioners of the District of Columbia to des

The following reports of committees ignate employees of the District to protect

were submitted:

life and property in and on the buildings and grounds of any institution located upon

By Mr. CORDON, from the Committee on property outside of the District of Columbia Interior and Insular Affairs:

S. 3134. A bill to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to construct, operate, and main

acquired by the United States for District sanitoriums, hospitals, training schools, and other institutions (Rept. No. 1773);

S. 3329. A bill to amend the District of Columbia Police and Firemen's Salary Act of 1953 to correct certain inequities (Rept. No. 1774); and

S. 3655. A bill to provide that the Metropolitan Police force shall keep arrest books which are open to public inspection (Rept. No. 1775).

By Mr. CRIPPA, from the Committee on the District of Columbia, with amendments: S. 3683. A bill to amend the District of Columbia Credit Unions Act (Rept. No. 1776); and

H. R. 6080. A bill to authorize the appropriation of funds for the construction of certain highway-railroad grade separations in the District of Columbia, and for other purposes (Rept. No. 1777).

By Mr. NEELY, from the Committee on the District of Columbia, without amendment:

S. 3558. A bill to amend the act entitled "An act to provide for the better registration of births in the District of Columbia, and for other purposes," approved March 1, 1907 (Rept. No. 1778).

By Mr. NEELY, from the Committee on the District of Columbia, with an amendment:

H. R. 9077. A bill to amend section 405 of the District of Columbia Law Enforcement Act of 1953, to make available to the judges of such District the psychiatric and psychological services provided for in such section (Rept. No. 1779).

By Mr. NEELY, from the Committee on the District of Columbia, with amendments: S. 1611. A bill to regulate the election of delegates representing the District of Columbia to national political conventions, and for other purposes (Rept. No. 1780);

S. 3518. A bill to amend the laws relating to fees charged for services rendered by the Office of the Recorder of Deeds for the District of Columbia and the laws relating to appointment of personnel in such office, and for other purposes (Rept. No. 1781); and

H. R. 7128. A bill to amend the act entitled "An act to provide an immediate revision and equalization of real-estate values in the District of Columbia; also to provide an assessment of real estate in said District in the

year 1896 and every third year thereafter, and for other purposes," approved August 14, 1894, as amended (Rept. No. 1782).

PUBLIC

SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION ACT OF 1954-REPORT OF A COMMITTEE (REPT. NO. 1771)

Mr. COOPER. Mr. President, the Committee on Public Labor and Public Welfare has ordered to be reported the bill (S. 2601) to provide for Federal financial assistance to the States and Territories in the construction of public elementary and secondary school facilities, with amendments. From that committee I now report the bill.

The written report on the bill is not yet ready and it will be some days before it can be put into final form. I feel that that fact should not delay making the text of the bill, in its amended form, available to the Congress and the public at large.

I ask unanimous consent that the names of the following Senators be carried as cosponsors on the next print of the bill: Mr. COOPER, Mr. SMITH of New Jersey, Mr. UPTON, Mrs. BOWRING, Mr.

MURRAY, Mr. HILL, Mr. NEELY, Mr. CLEMENTS, Mr. DOUGLAS, Mr. KENNEDY, and Mr. MCCLELLAN.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The bill will be placed on the calendar. and.

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