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LONDON:
JOSEPH HUGHES, PILGRIM STREET, LUDGATE HILL

1882.

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The SCHOOLMASTER says:-Admirable in every respect.

STANDARD

STORY BOOKS.

...

Large Type -- Beautifully Illustrated-Stronzly Bound. STORIES FOR INFANTS, 64 pp.

4d. STORIES FOR STANDARD III., 160 pp. STORIES FOR STANDARD 1., 96 pp.

6d. STORIES FOR STANDARD IV., 224 pp. STORIES FOR STANDARD II., 128 pp.

8d. STORIES FOR STANDARD V., 288 pp. STORIES FOR STANDARD VI., 320 pp., 2 s.

10d.

1s. 1s 6d.

These books exactly fulfil the conditions of ordinary Readers as set forth in the recently issued 'Circular to Inspectors.'

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS. THE TEACHER says:'We praised with unusual warmth the THE SCHOOL GUARDIAN says:-Just the sort of book to make a earlier books, and are pleased to find that the latest addition is child try to read it for the amusement it aftords. The point of all worthy of its predecessors. We have in this book stories of famous the tales is to teach kindness to animals-a most necessary lesson for London buildings, of travel, of animals, of heroes, and stories from youn, children, which could not be better enforced than it is here.' English and Scotch history. We congratulate Mr. Hughes on the

THE JOURNAL OF EDUCATION says :-'They are marvels of cheap. excellence of the “ Stories,” and we congratulate the children into

ness. The selection of poetry seems to us particularly happy.' whose hands they may fall.' The Irish Teachers' JOURNAL says : -The stories are not only

The Teacher's Assistant and Student's MAGAZINE says:-interesting, but are, at the same time, well worth remembering. The 'Not only suitable language, but suitable thoughts and subjects are pupil who reads of the Adventures of Alfred, the Death of Harold,

pressed into th• service, if we may say so; and the result is Story the Adventures of Robin Hood, the Battle of Crecy, the Loss of the Books which children, as soon as they begin to read at all, will love White Ship, and similar stories, is not likely to rest satisfied until he to read on every opportunity.' acquires a more extensive knowledge of the history of his country. THE SCHOLASTIC World says :-'Intended to make the path of But the stories are is sufficient variety to suit the tastes of readers reading as pleasant as possible to little learners. The stories are having no love for history: Geography, Natural History, Biography, well written and interesting, and the language is carefully graduated. and Domestic Economy have been laid under contribution, in order The series, so far, leaves little, if anything, to be desired, and is to turnish materials for one of the most charming Readers which can sure to become popular, both for home and school reading.' possibly be placed in the hands of an intelligent boy or girl.'

THE EDICATIONAL News (Scotland) says:-- Exactly such a THE SCHOOLMASTER says :--They are original, interesting, and book as an intelligent child would choose for its own reading.' attractive, and cannot fail to create a love for reading. They only THE EDUCATIONAL CHRONICLE says :-* The arrangement and require to be known to be appreciated.'

construction of these books have been carried out with utmost FAPERS FOR TEACHERS says :—They are charmingly written.' In the volume now before us (Standard V.) these features of ex.

THE SCHOOL AND UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE says:- Deserve our cellence have been equally well sustained. In addition to the highest commendation, and we unconditionally accord it to them. “Stories of Famous London Buildings," "Stories from English and Worthy of the young and enterprising publishing house whose im. Scottish History,” and “Stories of Travel, of Animals, and of print it bears."

Heroes,” we are pleased to see a Domestic Economy Lecture, the THE SCHOOL BOARD CHRONICLE says :- - They cannot hardly fail four chapters of which are certain to prove attractive reading, for to be favourite reading wi h the little ones.'

the girls especially. We cordially recommend the series.'

rc,

A FEW UNSOLICITED TESTIMONIALS FROM TEACHERS. "They have no rival, I think, in the school-book market.'

Will make an excellent second set.
Mr. Geo. ATKINSON, Noble Street School, Bolton.

Mr. A. GARDNER, Head Master, Board School, Leeds. 'My expectations have been greatly surpassed. I am quite sure from their interesting and varied contents, that the dullest children 'I cannot conceive a set of books that can in any way bear com. with these books will be incited to take a newer and livelier interest

parison with them for the purpose designed-teaching to read. in their reading lessons.'

Every line is full of interest and delight.'
Mr. T. C. Elliot, Springfield Board School, Sheffield.

Mr. James, British School, Hadleigh, Suffolk.
'I think Standard III. excellent.'
Miss CRADDOCK, Head Mistress, Albany-rd. Bd. Sc., London.

"The best I have seen.' I consider it (Standard V.) an excellent book.'

Mr. SAUNDERS, Ashburnham School. Mr. MOSSFORD, Head Master, Woolmore-st. Bd. Sc.;

Poplar, London.

'I cannot help expressing my great pleasure at making their

acquaintancs. They are equal, as ordinary school Readers, to any Thanks for your Standard V. Story Book. It is an excellent

now in the sparket, but as supplementary Readers they will be in. book: the children prefer-it to any of their other Readers.'

valuable, being so well calculated to relieve the tedium of school Mr. DUNMON, Head Master, Crow'n-st. Bd. Sc., Soho, W.C.

drudgery. 'I cordially approve of them.'

Mr. Mould, Brayton School, Selby. Mr. S. H. WALSH, St. Paul's Schools, Bolton. 'Charming Story Books. They almost make me wish that I were

I think they are capital; but the strongest testimony I can give

you as to their answering the purpose for which they were written a youngster again, so that I might have the pleasure of learning to

is to be found in the avidity with which my children read them.' read from them.' Mr. Walker, Cathedral Boys' School, Ripon.

Mr. StATHER, Hillhouse Board Schools, Huddersfield.

** SPECIMENS SENT POST FREE.

London : JOSEPH HUGHES, Pilgrim Street, Ludgate Hill, E.C.

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Stories from English History. X.—The Fight at Henlac.

BY THE REV. SIR G. W. COX, BART., M.A.

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THE
HE last preparations were now made turned hindmost. The sign seemed not

on either side. The Norman duke less discouraging than his stumble on the called for his coat of mail. As he put it beach when he landed from the Mora ; but on, the forepart was by some mischance with the same readiness which he then

(ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.)

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