Слике страница
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

1. President Wilson's Greatest Achievement.

By Robert Machray . NINETEENTH CENTURY AND AFTER 771 II. American Opinion. By Charles F. Thwing,

D.D. . . . . . . . HIBBERT Journal 781 III. John-a-Dreams. By Katharine Tynan.

Chapter XI. Octavia Brings Bad and

Good News. (To be continued) . . . . . 791 IV. A Poet-Statesman's Message for Today.

By W. T. Davison . . LONDON QUARTERLY REVIEW 796 V. From an Irish Notebook. By Alice Meynell Dublin REVIEW 800 VI. Changement de Secteur . . . WESTMINSTER Gazette 805 VII. German Plans for the Next War . . . . TIMES 808 VIII. To America, on Her First Sons Fallen in the Great War . . .

SPECTATOR 812 IX. What a Premature Peace Would Mean.

By J. Ellis Barker . NINETEENTH CENTURY AND AFTER 812 X. Vienna as It Is Today . . . MANCHESTER GUARDIAN 815

WARTIME FINANCE XI. Finding the Money . .

Economist 818 XII. An Effective Campaign .

. LONDON Post 820

A PAGE OF VERSE XIII. Dawn. By P. S. M. . . Blackwood's MAGAZINE 770 XIV. The Everlasting Honor. By Robert Nichols . New Witness 770 XV. In France. By Francis Ledwidge . . . SPECTATOR 770

BOOKS AND AUTHORS . . . . . . . 821

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY BY
THE LIVING AGE COMPANY

6 BEACON STREET, Boston

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION For Sıx DOLLARS, remitted directly to the Publishers, THE LIVING Age will be punctually forwarded for a year, free of postage, to any part of the United States. To Canada the postage Is 50 cents per annum.

Remittances should be made by bank draft or check, or by post-omce or express money order if possible. If neither of these can be procured, the money should be sent in a registered letter. All postmasters are obliged to register letters when requested to do so. Drafts, checkı, express and money orders should be made payable to the order of The LIVING AGD Co.

Single Copies of The LIVING AGE, 15 cents

[graphic]
[blocks in formation]

I. President Wilson's Greatest Achievement.

By Robert Machray . NINETEENTH CENTURY AND AFTER 771 II. American Opinion. By Charles F. Thwing,

D.D. . . . . . . . HIBBERT JOURNAL 781 III. John-a-Dreams. By Katharine Tynan.

Chapter XI. Octavia Brings Bad and
Good News. (To be continued)

. 791 IV. A Poet-Statesman's Message for Today.

By W. T. Davison . . LONDON QUARTERLY REVIEW 796 V. From an Irish Notebook. By Alice Meynell DUBLIN REVIEW 800 VI. Changement de Secteur . . . WESTMINSTER GAZETTE 805 VII. German Plans for the Next War . . . . TIMES 808 VIII. To America, on Her First Sons Fallen in

the Great War . . . . . . SPECTATOR 812 IX. What a Premature Peace Would Mean. By J. Ellis Barker

NINETEENTH CENTURY AND AFTER 812 X. Vienna as It Is Today . . . MANCHESTER GUARDIAN 815

WARTIME FINANCE XI. Finding the Money

Economist 818 XII. An Effective Campaign . . . . . London Post 820

A PAGE OF VERSE XIII. Dawn. By P. S. M. . . . Blackwood's Magazine 770 XIV. The Everlasting Honor. By Robert Nichols New Witness 770 XV. In France. By Francis Ledwidge . . SPECTATOR 770

BOOKS AND AUTHORS . . . . . . . 821

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY BY
THE LIVING AGE COMPANY

6 BEACON STREET, Boston

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION For Six DOLLARS, remitted directly to the Publishers. THE LIVING AGE will be punctually forwarded for a year, free of postage, to any part of the United States. To Canada the postage Is 50 cents per annum.

Remittances should be made by bank draft or check, or by post-office or express money order if possible. If neither of these can be procured, the money should be sent in a registered letter. All postmasters are obliged to register letters when requested to do so. Drafts, checki, oxpress and money orders should be made payable to the order of The LIVING AGE Co.

Single Copies of THE LIVING AGE, 15 cents

[blocks in formation]

PRESIDENT WILSON'S GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT.

If almost the latest in point of time, President Wilson is the most surprising as well as the most valuable discovery of the Allies. It is hardly an excess of language to say that he is one of the wonders of the War. He has accomplished that which in its way is among the most amazing feats of all history. To put it colloquially, he has swung into line with himself a free people of a hundred millions, the vast majority of whom not only were thoroughly pacific at heart but sincerely thought that their country had no special interest in, far less any vital concern with, the struggle, however much it was convulsing the rest of the world. It took him six months to bring about this prodigious result—not a long period when everything is considered. Events which occurred during these months have doubtless helped him materially, but previous events, not very dissimilar in their nature, had made no strong impression on the mass of American opinion. At the outset it might well have seemed an impossible undertaking. Germany was confident that it was impossible. More than that, she was certain, with that deadly infallibility of hers with respect to men and nations outside the Germanic pale which is one of the things working her ruin, that he would not fight at all. What he had said and done, or left unsaid and undone, in the earlier stages of the War had given Count Bernstorff, her Ambassador at Washington, that conviction, and she herself, counting besides on the Germans and pro-Germans and other factors in her favor in the United States, was of the same mind. For about two years and a half nothing took place seriously to disturb her in that comfortable belief. The feelings of pain and indignation evoked

throughout America by the torpedoing of the Lusitania, in itself as sinister an incident as could be imagined, did not lead the President to take belligerent action. Even when a year later, in his Note of April 1916, after the sinking of the Susser, he went so far as to threaten a rupture of relations, and Germany yielded to his demand for a restriction of submarine warfare, she was in reality as sure as ever that she had read him aright, and accordingly busied herself intensely in building fleets of U-boats—the lack of a sufficient number of which had been the true reason for her compliance. Not that she neglected to take such steps as appeared to her likely to assist him in keeping the path of peace. For example, immediately after the publication of the Sussex. Note myriads of telegrams arrived at Washington, as many as a hundred thousand messages being received in a single day, all protesting against war, and all of them, it subsequently came out, inspired by Count Bernstorff and his friends. This was only one of the numerous German plots and intrigues of which the United States had been and was then the field, and some at least of which must have been within Mr. Wilson's cognizance—as Germany knew perfectly, and was confirmed thereby in her conviction that he was not and never would be a fighter. She was to be undeceived, but for several months longer her belief in the unalterable character of the President's devotion to peace could not be said to be other than justified by the course which he adopted. President Wilson took the stage as the protagonist of peace. In May 1916 he spoke in North Carolina in favor of a negotiated settlement of the War. Later, in the same month, at a

« ПретходнаНастави »