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FOR DISEASES OF THE THROAT AND LUNGS, SUCH AS COUGHS, COLDS, WHOOPING COUGH, BRONCHITIS, ASTHMA, AND CONSUMPTION.

real value to mankind than this effectual remedy for all diseases of the THROAT and LUNGS. A vast trial of its virtues, throughout this and other countries, has shown that it does surely and effectually control them. The testimony of our best citizens, of all classes, establishes the fact, that CHERRY PECTORAL will and does relieve and cure the afflicting disorders of the Throat and Lungs beyond any other medicine. The most dangerous affections of the Pulmonary Organs yield to its power; and cases of CONSUMPTION, cured by this preparation, are publicly known, so remarkable as hardly to be believed, were they not proven beyond dispute. As a remedy it is adequate, on which the public may rely for full protection. By curing COUGHS, the forerunners of more serious disease, it saves unnumbered lives, and an amount of suffering not to be computed. It challenges trial, and convinces the most sceptical. Every family should keep it on hand as a protection against the early and unperceived attack of Pulmonary Affections, which are easily met at first, but which become incurable, and too often fatal, if neglected. Tender lungs need this defence: and it is unwise to be without it. As a safeguard to children, amid the distressing diseases which beset the Throat and Chest of childhood, CHERRY PECTORAL is invaluable; for, by its timely use, multitudes are rescued from premature graves and saved to the love and affection centred on them. It acts speedily and surely against ordinary colds, securing sound and healthrestoring sleep. No one will suffer troublesome INFLUENZA and painful BRONCHITIS, when they know how easily they can be cured.

Originally the product of long, laborious, and successful chemical investigation, no cost or toil is spared in making every bottle in the utmost possible perfection. It may be confidently relied upon as possessing all the virtues it has ever exhibited, and capable of producing cures as memorable as the greatest it has ever effected.

Prepared by Dr. J. C. AYER & CO., Lowell, Mass.,

Practical and Analytical Chemists.

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE.

Sole Agency for New Brunswick and Nova Scotia,

H. L. SPENCER,

MEDICAL WAREHOUSE, 20 NELSON STREET, ST. JOHN, N. B. GENERAL PATENT MEDICINE AGENCY FOR THE MARITIME PROVINCES.

MR. SPENCER would call the especial attention of Country Merchants and Consumers to a general assortment of PATENT MEDICINES, FANCY ARTICLES and TOILET GOODS, which by particular arrangements with the Manufacturers, he is enabled to supply to Dealers on the most FAVORABLE TERMS.

Correspondence and Orders solicited.

VOL. II.

N

MARITIME MONTHLY.

A Magazine of Literature, Science, and Art..

THE

JULY, 1873.

A

No. 1.

ARCTIC AND WESTERN PLANTS IN CONTINENTAL ACADIA.

HOW THEY CAME HERE, AND WHY THEY REMAIN.

[Read before the Natural History Society of New Brunswick, 13th April, 1869.]

(Abridged from the Canadian Naturalist.]

BY G. F. MATTHEW.

To the botanist this portion of the American continent presents

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an inviting field for research; for although one cannot expect to find new species in a region the greater part of which, when viewed from a geological standpoint, has but recently emerged from the ocean, and has therefore received its flora from. countries older and better known; yet the many peculiarities which may be observed in the distribution of plants in Acadia, form of themselves a subject in the study of which leisure hours may be profitably spent.

From the correspondence of natural features in Maine and New Brunswick, and from their situation, being alike exposed to the same variations of temperature, we would naturally expect to find no very marked differences between the floras of the two countries. This, indeed, is in a great measure the case, if we look upon Maine as a whole; but if we separate from it that portion of the State northward of the mountains which crosses its centre, and eastward of the Penobscot River, a palpable difference in the vegetation of the section north and south of this divisional line is apparent.

The northern section, with the adjoining province of New Brunswick may be designated Continental Acadia. Apparently merging into New England on the south-for there is no conspicuous natural barrier between the two countries-it is, nevertheless, as regards the indigenous plants which grow within its borders, closely allied to the neighboring province of Quebec, although a mountain range intervenes. This portion of Acadia contains four principal districts, viz.: an upper plain or plateau varying from about 200 to 500 feet above the sea, watered by the Upper St. John and its tributaries, the northern affluents of the Penobscot and the River Restigouche. A triangular plain expands from a point within a few miles of the Maine boundary to a width of 150 miles or more, where it passes beneath the waters of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. This lower plain rarely rises more than 300 feet above the sea. Between the upper and lower plain lies a broken country rising into a knot of high hills in northern New Brunswick, and lastly, there is a series of parallel ridges in the south, forming a hillcountry of less altitude than the last, lying along the north shore of the Bay of Fundy. About two-thirds of Continental Acadia is drained by the River St. John, which breaks from the level of the upper plains at the Grand Falls; and descending through several rapids and quick-waters, reaches tide-level at the western border of the lower plain, whence its course to the sea (distant ninety miles) is comparatively sluggish.

The rest of the Maritime Provinces of Canada, consisting of Nova Scotia and the twin islands of Prince Edward and Cape Breton, may be comprised under the term Insular Acadia.

Before describing in detail the peculiar groupings of species in the continental part of Acadia, it may not be amiss to mention a few of the agencies which have given rise to the diversified forms of vegetation now existing on the earth; and then to add some remarks upon their peculiar manifestation in that part of America to which these observations more particularly relate, and to show their influence upon the range of plants within it.

Of these agents perhaps the most important is Variation of Temperature. It is well known that there are two directions in which this variation occurs, one on going north or south from the Equator, and the other in ascending from the level of the ocean to the tops of mountains. In both of these the temperature becomes lower in proportion to the elevation in the one case, or to

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