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the lot of our American manufacturing plants during the past few months.

“I believe the principle of profit sharing, of industrial pensions and workmen's compensation laws, while they have been questioned in the introductory stages, are really as much in favor among broad-minded business men today as among the workers themselves. They all mark steps forward in giving the workingman a greater contentment and efficiency.

“Every worker in an industrial plant should be made to realize that its prosperity is his; that its future is his; that the bigger it becomes, the more places will be open to him for advancement and expansion. Every community ought to feel a spirit of responsibility for the betterment of its industries. Prosperous establishments make a prosperous town, and many a silly municipality, which has considered its industries only as convenient sources of taxation, has learned, to its sorrow, that encouraging, rather than discouraging enterprise, is the policy that pays the best.

“Business is not so much dealing with dollars as with humanity; dollars are merely incidental. Production, selling, buying, using, are essentially creatures of humanity, and humanity is about the same today as it always has been since the birth of time. There aren't any very complex motives in humanity; he who will read the pages of history or note with an intelligent eye the things about him-assuming that he will do it without prejudice and selfishness and hatred—can decide which policy or line of conduct is best calculated to measure up to the prospects of success.

"These, then, are a few of the thoughts I would leave with you as to the aim and spirit of the 'industrial conservation movement.' Business has been misunderstood, and is largely to blame for it. By failing to maintain the intimate touch with the community, it has failed to encourage that kind of interest in itself as a community asset that it should enjoy. Business has become a popular ‘goat for the politician to ride, and a very convenient and useful goat, at that. And industry has paid a tremendous price for all this.”The Voter and His Employer. :

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VOL. XIV

No. 6

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE NATIONAL FOUNDERS' ASSOCIATION AND NATIONAL METAL TRADES ASSOCIATION IN THE INTERESTS

OF THEIR WORKMEN

CONTENTS FOR JUNE, 1917

234

236.

The Development of the Molding Machine.....
Comment

............................................
How the Molders' Union Restricts Output........
Workmen's Compensation Laws Clash.......
Cleveland Unions Violate Their Contracts..
The Farmer and Organized Labor..........
How All Can Serve...... ----------------------------------

242

246

251

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NOTICE

THE REVIEW, which is published by The National Founders' Association and the National Metal Trades Association, desires to have all foundry and machine shop employees fully acquainted with the policies and purposes of the two Associations.

Employees of members of the Associations who wish to receive the magazine regularly are invited to send their names and addresses to

THE REVIEW
Room 842, 29 South La Salle St.

CHICAGO

with the understanding that they incur no expense or obligation.

New applicants should state the name of employer and whether they are employed in foundry or machine shop.

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