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rent of air through the interior of the car and out of the ventilators, and thus the air in. side is constantly being changed. While riding over the Northern Central railroad, where this system of heating and ventilation was in operation, one cold winter's night, your inspector made careful and frequent comparison between the outside and the car atmosphere, and could discover nothing offensive in the air of car, which was fairly filled with passengers. The average cost of the appliances to heat and ventilate in the above manner, allowing for two stoves or furnaces and for the air pipes complete, is said not to exceed $150, and probably could be placed in a car while being constructed for a less sum. The arrangement of the ventilators in the upper deck cannot much exceed the cost of those ordinarily used.

It is evident, and must be to every one who will investigate the subject, that a constant change of air in a passenger car is necessary for comfort and health, and the foregoing or a similar method is the only way to maintain a pure atmosphere, and at the same time a comfortable temperature, both of which can be attained at little if any cost above that of direct radiation by the ordinary methods.

Recently a device in the shape of a casing outside the smoke stack of heaters, and provided with dampers and vents at bottom, has been brought into use, the effect of which is not to intensify the heat near the furnaces, above that in the center of the car.

Circular No. 22 before referred to, also advises among other things, “ to place a Fahren. heit thermometer in all passenger cars, about the center thereof, and to instruct those charged with maintaining the temperature, to keep it as nearly as may be at the point of seventy degrees.'

Your inspector did not find such thermometer in any drawing-room, sleeping, or ordidary passenger car, and was informed that all thermometers before provided had been removed.

The use of a thermometer is a necessity, otherwise an established degree of heat cannot be observed, but is subjected to the uncertainty of guess work, often resulting in a temperature far below or above that required or desirable.

Such a result was often noticed while making inspections for this report. Cars stilling with beat were kept oppressive by train men firing stoves already throwing out more warmth than was bearable, and this was almost invariably done at division terminals, where train crews were changed. When remonstrated with a window was thrown open, perhaps a door, or worse, a drop ventilator would be let down, each very soon to be closed by some exposed passenger.' Especially was the over-heating of cars, as was lack of Fentilation, noticeable on night trains, and where long runs were made between stoppings. Way trains were generally found very well ventilated and warmed.

Your inspector did not observe many flagrant instances of carelessness or inattention on the part of train men in the matter of heating or of ventilation. In the foregoing, allusion has been made to such; but in general, effort appears to be made to suit the wishes ofpas sengers, and probably where direct radiation is employed for heating, as it is in a large majority of the cars in our State – the system was more at fault than those in charge.

身 Your inspector has no suggestions to make other than intimated. The matter of a proper heat or of ventilation, is viewed differently by nearly all affected, and the only way to reach a solution, is to provide the proper appliances for ventilating, and set up a standard of heat and a register, as advised by your Honorable Board.

Respectfully submitted, Dated ALBANY, N. Y., March 18, 1886.

THOS. W. SPENCER, Inspector.

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ADDENDUM. Since the foregoing inspections were made, it has been observed that the Boston and Albany Railroad Company have placed thermometers in about the center of all passenger cars.

Inquiry as to the practical workings and the utility of such a register, gave to your inspector the gratifying answers given below, and which sustain the position taken by your Honorable Board

A conductor on the above railroad stated: • It was a great satisfaction to know precisely the temperature of a car. He was able to refer to it and inform those objecting or feeling to object to the condition of heat or cold, and that the matter was at once pleasantly settled to gratification of all, and the remedy, if necessary, could be immediately attempted.” “Brakemen coming from the outside air, and perhaps feeling the cold, could and did before any change in heat of car was made, first refer to his register and act accordingly."

Your inspector feels warranted in saying, if a thermometer to govern the heat of cars was in general use on the lines of road in our State, it would add much to the comfort of the pablic, and save many disputes between passengers and employees of trains.

THOS. W. SPENCER, Dated ALBANY, N. Y., April 9, 1886.

Inspector.

MINUTES OF THE BOARD,

REPORTED IN PURSUANCE OF SECTIONS 2 AND 10 OF CHAPTER

353, LAWS OF 1882.

OCTOBER 6, 1885.
The Board met pursuant to rule. Present — Commissioners Kernan and Rogers.
The minutes were read and approved.
The Secretary submitted the unfinished business under the rule, viz. :

Reply of Nelson Burdick to answers of the Rome, Watertown, and Ogdensburgh and the Utica and Black River Railroad Companies, and petition of citizens of Watertown, Ordered, that copies of the same be forwarded to the railroad companies.

Telegram and letter with inclosures from J. R. Maxwell, vice-president Long Island Railroad Company, relative to statistics as to manure. Ordered laid over.

Letter of Fred. F. Chambers, Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad Company, relative to complaint of town of Sauquoit. Ordered filed.

Letter of R. M. Olyphant, Delaware and Hudson Canal Company, relative to complaint of U. G. Paris. Ordered filed.

Letter of Corning Glass Works. Ordered that a copy of the letter be sent the Fall Brook Coal Company, and that the company be requested to reply as to whether it desires to make any answer thereto.

Letter from L. A. Sneden, relative to his complaint against the New Jersey and New York Railroad Company. Ordered, that a copy of so much of the letter as relates to the complaint of himself be sent to the New Jersey and Neva York Railroad Company, together with a statement that the disposition of the matter seems to be satisfactory to Mr. Sneden, and the case is closed.

Letter of C. M. Depew, relative to Herkimer called up. Laid over one week.

On motion of Commissioner Rogers, the Secretary was directed to write to Daniel Robinson, president of the Troy and Boston Railroad Company, that the Board demand that he furnish them on or before Monday, October 12th, quarterly reports for the quarters ending March 31, 1885, and June 30, 1885.

Commissioner Rogers verbally reported that Commissioners O'Donnell and Rogers inspected under instructions of the Board an automatic gate of the Automatic Railway Gate and Signal Company in experimental operation on the Staten Island Railroad on Wednesday, September 30th.

Commissioner Kernan reported that as a committee of the Board on September 30th, he heard Mr. H. G. Young, assistant general manager, in defense of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company against the complaint of the Board of Health of Mechanicrille.

Commissioner Rogers called up the report of an accident at Colliers, 28th of September, on Delaware and Hudson Canal Company's road. Ordered, that inquiry be made of Superintendent Hammond what discipline, if any, had been administered to the men stated in the report to be at fault. The Board adjourned.

WILLIAM C. HUDSON,

Secretary.

OCTOBER 13, 1885. The Board met pursuant to rule. Present – Commissioners Kernan, Rogers and O'Don. nell.

The minutes were read and approved.
The Secretary submitted the unfinished business under the rule, viz. :

Letters of the Fall Brook Coal Company and the Corning Glass Works, relative to the complaint of the latter against the former. Ordered, that the letter of the Fall Brook Coal Company lay over one week, and that the following communication be sent the Corning Glass Works:

“ Enclosed herewith you will find a copy of a communication from the Fall Brook Company. The Board understands that the Fall Brook Company clarm that fire dollars is a reasonable charge for switching cars and will make such charge hereafter to all alike. The reasonableness of this charge has not been a question presented in this case and has not therefore been investigated by the Board.”

Letter of the trustee of the bondholders of the Whitestone and Westchester Railroad Company. Ordered usual course.

Leiter of J. E. Merrill, treasurer of Troy and Boston Railroad Company, relative to delinquent quarterly reports.

Commissioner Rogers offered the following resolution :

WHEREAS, The Troy and Boston Railroad Company have failed to furnish quarterly, reports to this Board for the quarters ending December 31, 1884; March 31, 1885, and June 80. 1885, potwithstanding repeated requests so to do; that for December 31st, having been obtained by the Attorney-General,

Resolved. That the Attorney-General be requested to cause the president of said Troy and Boston Railroad Company to be indicted for misdemeanor under section 7 of chapter 333, Laws of 1882, unless said reports shall be received on or before October 14, 1885. Carried.

Letter of J. D. Lasng, West Shore Railroad Company, relative to the electric signal at Bethlehem. Ordered, that the letter be filed and that the Secretary write the road for a detailed statement, showing the condition in which the signal was found, the part or parts that had failed, the cause of failure, repairs made and length of time it was in operation before failure, with a view of informing the Board as to the practicability of electric apparatus. Further, whether in the judgment of the authorities of the road, the apparatus had been tampered with.

Letter of J. F. Maynard, Utica and Black River Railroad Company, relative to the complaint of Nelson Burdick. On motion of commissioner Rogers, the hearing in this case was set down for October 28th, 10 A, M., at the Woodruff flouse, Watertown, and it was ordered that the Utica and Black River Railroad Company and Nelson Burdick be notified that the Board will also inspect the premises and hear any objections the company may offer as to the practicability of the switches and side track's proposed by the complainant, the hearing being designed to cover all questions in the case.

Leiter of Mr. II. G. Young, Delaware and Iludson Canal Company, relative to the complaint of Mr. U. G, Paris.

Mr. Young was heard in defense of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company. Ordered, that the Board have a hearing at Sandy Hill, at 11 o'clock on October 20, 1885, and that the Secretary notify Messrs. U. G, Paris, H. G. Young and the village authorities.

Letter of C. W. Hutchinson, president Utica aud Mohawk Railroad Company, requesting an extension of time in which to answer complaint. Granted, and time extended to October 26th.

Letter of J. J. Van llorne, Utica and Black River Railroad Company, relative to the complaint of Mr. C. L. Merriam. Ordered, case closed.

Letter of Mr. J. M. Heald, Long Island Railroad Company, relative to manure statistics, laid over from last meeting. Ordered, land over one week longer.

Letter of Mr. C. M. Depew, relative to Herkimer station. Ordered laid over one week. The Board adjourned until Monday, October 19th, at 5 P. M.

WILLIAM C. HUDSON,

Secretary.

OCTOBER 19, 1885.
The Board met at 4:30 P. M., pursuant to adjournment. All present.
The reading of the minutes of last meeting were dispensed with.
The Secretary laid before the Board the unfinished business, as follows:

Letter of Mr. II. P. Sinclaire, secretary of the Corning Glass Works, notifying Board that the Fall Brook Coal Company had raised the price for switching cars loaded with coal from to $5. Laid over.

Letter of Myron W. Van Auken, corporation counsel city of Utica, in matter of city of Utica v. Utica and Mohawk Railroad Company. Ordered, that letter be filed with papers in the case.

Letter of James F. Mann, attorney for petitioners in matter of City of Utica r. Utica and Mohawk Railroad Company. Ordered, that letter be filed with papers in the case.

Letter of J. R. Maxwell, Long Island Railroad Company, with accompanying letter of Chas. M. Ileald and statement showing the extent of the manure business on the Long Island railroad in tubs, monthly, during the year preceding September 30, 1894, and for the nine months coding June 30, 1855. Ordered, that copy be sent complainant.

NEW BUSINESS, Circular, statement showing the number of passengers carried by all the elevated rail. war lines of New York city, and gross receipts of same, from the first opening of the roads up to October 1, 1885. Laid over.

Circular of Keeler Foot Guard, showing diagram of same. Ordered filed with improve. ment papers:

Bv Commissioner Rogers :

Resolved, That the Attorney-General be requested to appear in behalf of Commissioner Rogers in Part Four of the Superior Court of the city of New York, at 11 A, M., on Friday, October 23, in the case of Bowles v. The Rome, Watertown and Ogdensburgh Railroad Company, to present the question of his exemption as a matter of privilege from testify. ing in private suits for damages against railroad corporations, as to facts which have been disclosed to him in the course of an official investigation. Adopted.

Ordered, that the Secretary transmit to the Attorney-General a certified copy of the | resolution as adopted this day. The Board adjourned.

WILLIAM C. HUDSOX,

Secrelary.

OCTOBER 27, 1885. The Board met pursuant to rule. The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved. The Secretary submitted the unfinished business, under the rule, as follows:

Application of the Broadway Railroad Company of Brooklyn for an increase of capital stock. Referred to Commissioner Kernan.

In the matter of the Corning Glass Works' complaint. Ordered, that the letter of the Corning Glass Works be received as a new complaint, and take the usual course.

In the matter of the village of Whitestone. Ordered case closed.

The informal answer of the l'tica and Mohawk Railroad Company. Ordered filed, and that a hearing be set down at Utica, at Baggs' Hotel, 12 a., November 13, 1885, and matter be referred to Commissioner Rogers.

In the matter of Nelson Burdick against The Utica and Black River Railroad Company, hearing postponed until the 18th of November.

Commissioner Rogers offered the following: Resolved, That this Board has heard with great regret of the death of W. J. MacDonald, who for more than two years has been a valuable and efficient clerk in this office, and that the Board herewith tender to his bereaved family, its sympathy. Adopted. Ordered, that the Secretary approve the bill of W. J. MacDonald, for the month of October.

Commissioner Kernan moved that when the Board adjourn, it adjourn until Wednesday, November 11, at 10 a. M. Adopted.

Commissioner Rogers called up the matter of the John D. Wing complaint against the Newburgh, Dutchess and Connecticut Railroad Company. Ordered that the Secretary write the usual letter as to compliance with the decision of the Board.

Commissioners Kernan and Rogers submitted a report in the matter of the Board of Health of Mechanicville against The Delaware and Iludson Canal Company. Adopted and ordered issued.

Commissioner Rogers called up the matter of the removal of the thermometers from the cars of the New York Central Sleeping Car Company, and the failure of the roads to comply with the recommendations of the Board in that matter. Referred to Commissioner Rogers. The Board then adjourned.

WILLIAM HUD

Secretary.

NOVEMBER 10, 1885.
All present. The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved.

The Secretary submitted a report on the business of the office. Referred to Commissioner Kernan.

Answer of Fall Brook Coal Company to complaint of Corning Glass Works. Ordered usual course.

Communication of the Board of Trade and Transportation in answer to one of the Board of June 9, 1885. Ordered filed.

Communication of A. Shoelkoff received. The Secretary was directed write to the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad Company, and inquire why the gates erected at Niagara Falls were not so erected as to inclose all of the tracks, and also whether the bigh board fence between the depot and the street has been replaced by a picket fence, as agreed at the time of the inspection.

Comunication from Board of Health at Mechanicville. Ordered held open until Mr, Smith is heard from.

Petition of citizens of Utica in regard to the Schuyler street crossing. Ordered complaint sent to Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad Company, with request to answer whether or not the facts as alleged exist.

Communication of U. G. Paris. Ordered laid over.

Communication of C. L. Kimball, superintendent of the Newburgh, Dutchess and Connecticut Railroad, in regard to depot at Dutchess Junction. Ordered Secretary write to the president of the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad Company that the Board have waited for an answer to the communication sent to them in reference to the depot at Dutchess Junction, and the Board desires an immediate answer.

Communication of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad Company, in regard to the depot at Sauquoit. Ordered that the Secretary write to the complainants and ask them to inform the Board, within a reasonable time, whether the station is made so as to be acceptable.

Communication of W. S. Webb of the New York Central Sleeping Car Company, in regard to temperature of sieeping cars. Commissioner O'Donnell moved that Inspector Spencer be instructed, after he finisbes his inspection reports, to make a personal inspection of the principal railroads of the State and ascertain the condition of temperature and ven. tilation in sleeping cars, drawing room cars and first class passenger cars, and the attention that porters pay to the traveling public, and report in detail to this Board, and that he be authorized, if necessary, to einploy help at an expense not to exceed $100. Communication of Lewis Hayes referred to Mr. Thompson.

Communication of President Depew of the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad Company, in reference to complaint of C. W. Van Rensselaer, referred to Commissioner Rogers.

Communication of Samuel Sloan, president Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad Company in regard to Mr. Littlewood's complaint against that road. Ordered filed.

Communication from Corning Glass Works in regard to an attempt of Fall Brook Coal Company to tear up their switch. Ordered filed.

Communication of J. M. Dake. Laid over. Communication of Farmers' Co-operative Union of Jamaica. Referred to Commissioner Kernan.

Communication of J. D. Layng, New York, West Shore and Buffalo railroad, relative to signal at Bethlehem station. Ordered, that Secretary send for dates of failure of signal to operate.

Commissioner Rogers moved that the Secretary write to Commissioner Fink to transmit to the Board the terms of the new arrangement or agreement between the trunk lines as soon as the same is executed. Carried.

J. Edgar Merrill, treasurer Troy and Boston Railroad Company, appeared and was heard relative to the quarterly reports in which the road is delinquent.

Commissioner O'Donnell offered the application of Lyman J. Lloyd, Jr., for an expert appointment under the Board. Ordered filed.

Letter of F. S. Crooker. Ordered that the Secretary send the “Safety Law," and write that the Board does not see, if the road is not operated, the necessity for a watchman at the point indicated. With reference to the matter of pay, the Board has no power to assist its collection, and that bis recourse is to go to the courts. By Commissioner O'Donnell:

Kesolved, That an inquiry be sent to the respective presidents of the New York Central and Hudson River railroad and the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company, as to the prac. tibility of connecting their passenger depots in the city of Albany, so that the trareling public can reach their depot without going a long circuitous distance over several streets. Carried.

The accountant submitted a communication of the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company, asking whether the Board required a report as to the value of its real estate in this or in other States as well. Ordered, that the value of property in this State be required. Also,

A report of the Elmira and Horseheads Railroad Company. Received instructions to write to the company to hereafter change their methods of book-keeping so that the report can be as the form requires. Also,

The report of the Utica and Mohawk Railroad Company, which he reported to be in bad shape and needing corrections. Ordered, t.) lay over until after the hearing of the 13th.

Commissioner Kernan moved that the order of reference of the complaint of the Citizens of Utica v. The Utica and Mohawk Railroad Company be changed from Commissioner Rogers to Commissioners Rogers and O'Donnell. Carried. Adjourned.

WILLIAM C. HUDSON,

Secretary.

NOVEMBER 17, 1885.
The Board met pursuant to rule. Present - Commissioners Kernan and Rogers.
The minutes were read and approved.
The Secretary submitted the unfinished business under the rule as follows:

Letter of George H. Littlewood recalling his petition, Ordered, that request be granted and the case closed.

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