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petent authority, until superseded under the laws now in force, or under this constitution.

Sec, 7. The members of the senate and house of representatives of the legislature of one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one shall continue in office, under the provisions of law, until superseded by their successors, elected and qualified under this constitution.

Sec. 8. All county officers, unless removed by competent authority, shall continue to hold their respective offices until the first day of January, in the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-three. The laws now in force as to the election, qualification, and duties of township officers shall continue in force until the legislature shall, in conformity to the provisions of this constitution, provide for the holding of elections to fill such offices, and prescribe the duties of such officers respectively.

Sec. 9. On the first day of January, in the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-two, the terms of cffice of the judges of the supreme court under existing laws, and of the judges of the county courts, and of the clerks of the supreme court, shall expire on the said day.

Sec. 10. On the first day of January, in the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-two, the jurisdiction of all suits and proceedings then pending in the present supreme court shall become vested in the supreme court established by this constitution, and shall be finally adjudicated by the court where the same may be pending. The jurisdiction of all suits and proceedings at law and equity, thien pending in the circuit courts and county courts for the several counties shall become vested in the circuit court of the said counties and district court of the upper peninsula.

Sec. 11. The probate courts, the courts of justices of the peace, and the police court authorized by an act entitled “ an act to establish a police court in the city of Detroit,” approved April second, one thousand eight hundred and fifty, shall continue to exercise the jurisdiction and powers now conferred upon them respectively, until otherwise provided by law.

Sec. 12. The office of State printer shall be vested in the present incumbent until the expiration of the term for which he was elected under the law then in force; and all the provisions of the said law relating to his duties, rights, privileges, and compensation, shall remain unimpaired and inviolate until the expiration of his said term of office.

Sec. 13. It shall be the duty of the legislature, at their first session, to adapt the present laws to the provisions of this constitution, as far as may be.

Sec. 14. The attorney general of the State is required to prepare and report to the legislature, at the commencement of the next session, such changes and modifications in existing laws as may be deemed necessary to adapt the same to this constitution, and as may be best calculated to carry into effect its provisions; and he shall receive no additional compensation therefor.

Sec. 15. Any territory attached to any county for judicial purposes, if not otherwise represented, shall be considered as forming part of such county, so far as regards elections for the purpose of representation.

[Sections 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21, referring to the mode of voting for the new constitution, are omitted, not having any direct connection with the instrument.]

Sec. 22. Every county except Mackinaw and Chippewa, entitled to a representative in the legislature, at the time of the adoption of this constitution, shall continue to be so entitled under this constitution; and the county of Saginaw, with the territory that may be attached, shall be entitled to one representative; the county of Tuscola, and the territory that may be attach

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ed, one representative; the county of Sanilac and the territory that may be attached, one representative; the counties of Midland and Arenac, [Bay,) with the territory that may be attached, one representative; the county of Montcalm, with the territory that may be attached thereto, one representative; and the counties of Newaygo and Oceana, with the territory

may be attached thereto, one representative. Each county having a ratio of representation and a fraction over, equal to a moiety of said ratin, shall be entitled to two representatives, and so on above that number, giring one additional member for each additional ratio.

Sec. 23. The cases pending and undisposed of in the late court of chancery, at the time of the adoption of this constitution, shall continue to be heard and determined by the judges of the supreme court. But the legislature shall, at its session in one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one, provide by law for the transfer of said causes that may remain undisposed of on the first day of January, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-two, to the supreme or circuit court, established by this constitution, or require that the saine may be heard and determined by the circuit judges.

Sec. 24. The term of office of the governor and lieutenant governor shall commence on the first day of January next after their election.

Sec. 25. The territory described in the article entitled “Upper Peninsula," shall be attached to and constitute a part of the third circuit for the elec tion of a regent of the university.

Sec. 26. The legislature shall have authority, after the expiration of the term of office of the district judge first elected for the upper peninsula, to abolish said office of district judge and district attorney, or either of them.

Sec. 27. The legislature shall, at its session of one thousand eight hundred and fifty-one, apportion the representatives among the several counties and districts, and divide the State into senate districts, pursuant to the provisions of this constitution.

Sec. 28. The terms of office of all State and county officers, of the circuit judges, members of the board of education, and members of the legislature, shall begin on the first day of January next succeeding their election.

Sec. 29. The State, exclusive of the upper peninsula, shall be divided into eight judicial circuits, and the counties of Monroe, Lenawee, and Hillsdale, shall constitute the first circuit; the counties of Branch, St. Joseph, Cass, and Berrien, shall constitute the second circuit; the county of Wayne shall constitute the third circuit; the counties of Washtenaw, Jackson, and Ing. ham, shall constitute the fourth circuit; the counties of Calhoun, Kalamazoo, Allegan, Eaton, and Van Buren, shall constitute the fifth circuit; [the] counties of St. Clair, Macomb, Oukland, and Sanilac, shall constitute the sixth circuit; the counties of Lapeer, Genesee, Saginaw, Shiawassee, Liv. ingston, Tuscola, and Midland, shall constitute the seventh circuit; and the counties of Barry, Kent, Ottawa, Ionia, Clinton, and Moutcalm shall constitute the eighth circuit.

Done in convention, at the capital of the State, this fifteenth day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty, and of the independence of the United States the seventy-fifth.

D. GOODWIN, President.

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION. On the 8th of November, 1870, the people of Michigan voted upon the ratification of four amendments to the State constitution, as follows: First, an amendment striking out the word "white" wherever it occurs in the organic law; Second, authorizing the board of supervisors of any county to borrow or raise by tax two thousand dollars, for constructing or repairing public buildings, highways, or bridges, but no greater amount without the sanction of the electors of such county; Third, an amendment for increasing the salaries of the State executive and judicial officers; and Fourth, an amendment authorizing the legislature to pass laws establishing certain charges on the railroads of the State, prohibiting running contracts between railroad companies with certain discriminations, also prohibiting the consolidation of stock, property, or franchises between parallel or competing lines of railroads without due notice to stockholders, and finally, that the legislature may provide by law for the payment by counties, townships, and municipalities of the State, of all bonds or other obligations heretofore issued in aid of railroads, subject to the will of the electors of each county. As the concluding page of this volume is passing through the press, it is quite impossible to ascertain the official result of the election on these amendments; but according to the latest newspaper reports, they have all been defeated excepting the two articles, placing railroad tariffs under the control of the legislature, and forbidding

the consolidation of competing lines of railroads, and perhaps the amendment on suffrage.

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