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By unanimous consent,

Mr. Fassett introduced a bill entitled "An act relating to foreign co-operative loan and building associations, and other simular associations doing business in the State of New York, and requiring them to report to the Superintendent of the Banking Department (Int. No. 177), which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on general laws.

By unanimous consent,

Also, a bill entitled "An act for the protection of employes in in cases of voluntary transfers of property by employers" (Int. No. 178), which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on general laws.

By unanimous consent,

Also, a bill entitled "An act to amend an act entitled 'An act in relation to common schools in the village of Elmira,' passed April 4, 1859" (Int. No. 179), which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on cities.

By unanimous consent,

Mr. Laughlin (for Mr. Vedder) introduced a bill entitled "An act to sanction and legalize the action of John S. Kenyon, Clerk of the Senate of the State of New York, in appointing Myron C. Gallup to be superintendent of the wrapping department of the Senate and to authorize the Board of Claims to hear audit and determine the claim said Gallup has against the State for compensation for services as such superintendent" (Int. No. 180), which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on claims.

By unanimous consent,

Mr. Stewart introduced a bill entitled "An act to amend section 1929 of chapter 410 of the Laws of 1882, entitled 'An act to consolidate into one act and to declare the special and local laws affecting public interests in the city of New York" (Int. No. 181), which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on cities.

Mr. Hawkins presented a petition of certain residents of Suffolk county, praying for improvements of the Peconic river; which was read and referred to the committee on finance.

Mr. Deane, from the committee on miscellaneous corporations, to which was referred the bill introduced by Mr. Roesch, Int. No. 66, entitled "An act to amend section 2 of chapter 37 of the Laws of 1848, entitled 'An act to authorize the formation of gas-light companies, and for other purposes,'" reported the same to the Senate. On motion of Mr. Deane, and by unanimous consent, it was ordered that said bill be printed, and recommitted to the committee on miscellaneous corporations.

Mr. Deane, from the committee on miscellaneous corporations, to which was referred the bill introduced by Mr. Chase, Int. No. 137, entitled "An act to repeal chapter 633 of the Laws of 1873, entitled 'An act to authorize the incorporation of Baptist and Congregational

churches in the State of New York,' and supplementary to an act entitled 'An act to provide for the incorporation of religious societies,' passed April 5, 1813," reported in favor of the passage of the same, which report was agreed to, and said bill committed to the committee of the whole.

Mr. Deane, from the committee on miscellaneous corporations, to which was referred the bill introduced by Mr. Chase, Int. No. 136, entitled "An act to amend section 3 of chapter 60 of the Laws of 1813, entitled 'An act to provide for the incorporation of religious societies," reported in favor of the passage of the same, which report was agreed to, and said bill committed to the committee of the whole.

Mr. Deane, from the committee on miscellaneous corporations, to which was referred the bill introduced by Mr. Sloan, Int. No. 85, entitled "An act to amend chapter 611 of the Laws of 1870, entitled 'An act to provide for the organization and regulation of certain business corporations,'" reported in favor of the passage of the same, which report was agreed to, and said bill committed to the committee of the whole.

Mr. Emerson, from the committee on villages, to which was referred the bill introduced by Mr. Donaldson, Int. No. 76, entitled "An act to amend chapter 303 of the Laws of 1881, entitled 'An act to amend and consolidate the charter of the village of Johnstown, and the several acts amendatory thereof,'" reported in favor of the passage of the same, with amendments, which report was agreed to, and said bill committed to the committee of the whole.

Mr. Fassett offered the following:

Resolved, That Rule 48 of the Senate be amended so as to read as follows:

RULE 48. In addition to the members, officers and employes of the Senate, members and officers of the Assembly, the following persons only shall be admitted on the floor of the Senate: The Governor, his private secretary and appointment clerk, the Secretary of State, the Comptroller, the Treasurer, the Attorney-General, the State Engineer and Surveyor, and their deputies, the Commissioner of the Capitol, the Superintendent of Public Buildings, and his deputy, officials (except notaries public) confirmed by vote of the Senate, or elected by the Legislature; reporters of the press, designated under Rule 10, or duly appointed by the Assembly, and ladies, may be admitted on the card of the President, or of a Senator.

Ordered, That said resolution be referred to the committee on rules.

The President presented the eleventh annual report of the Trustees of the Binghamton Asylum for the Insane, for the year 1889; which was laid upon the table and ordered printed.

(See Doc. No. 11.)

Mr. Fassett moved that the Senate do now take a recess until 12.30 o'clock.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

TWELVE O'CLOCK AND THIRTY MINUTES P. M.

The Senate again met.

Mr. Fassett moved that the Senate take a further recess until 1.30 o'clock.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

ONE O'CLOCK AND THIRTY MINUTES P. M.

The Senate again met.

The Assembly returned the bill (No. 96, Int. No. 118) entitled "An act to provide for exhibitions of arts, sciences, manufactures and products of the soil, mine and sea in the city of New York," with a message that they have concurred in the passage of the same, with the following amendments:

Section 4, engrossed bill, lines 42 to 52, after the words "William M. Speer," strike out the words "and the following-named persons: Samuel Sloan, Sidney Dillon, Herman O. Armour, Noah Davis, William H. Webb, Henry Hall, William P. Clyde, Austin Corbin, William Brookfield, John F. Plummer, Leslie Russell, Albert M. Palmer, Christopher C. Baldwin, James M. Varnum, Edward Mitchell, Richard A. McCurdy, Albert B. Boardman, Charles A. Peabody, Jr., Louis F. Payn, Ellis H. Roberts, Erastus Corning, Hiram Hitchcock, James Wood and William Arnoux," and insert the word "and" between the names of "Benjamin Wood" and "William M. Speer" in lines 41 and 42.

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Mr. Cantor moved that the Senate do concur in the amendments of the Assembly to the above entitled bill.

Mr. Erwin moved to amend said motion that the Senate do nonconcur in the amendments, and that a committee of conference be appointed thereon by the President on the part of the Senate, and request the appointment of a like committee on the part of the Assembly.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to the appointment of a committee of conference, and it was decided in the affirmative, as follows:

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When the name of Mr. Jacobs was called the Chair stated that he

was paired with Mr. O'Connor.

The President appointed as such committee, Messrs. Erwin, Cantor and Stewart.

Ordered, That President return said bill to the Assembly with a message that the Senate have non-concurred in their amendments, and have appointed a committee of conference thereon, and request the appointment of a like committee on the part of the Assembly.

Mr. Erwin moved that the Senate take a recess until 9 o'clock. The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

NINE O'CLOCK P. M.

The Senate again met.

The Assembly returned the bill (No. 96, Int. No. 118) entitled "An act to provide for exhibitions of arts, sciences, manufactures and products of the soil, mine and sea in the city of New York," with a message that they have consented to the appointment of a committee of conference thereon, and have appointed as such committee Messrs. Acker, Andrus, R. Lewis, Sheehan and Blumenthal. On motion of Mr. Fassett, the Senate adjourned.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, 1890.

The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

Prayer by Rev. D. L. Schwartz.

The journal of yesterday was read and approved.

Mr. Van Gorder, from the committee on engrossed bills, reported as correctly engrossed the bills entitled as follows:

"An act to establish the compensation of the county judge of Westchester county." (Int. No. 42.)

"An act to amend sections 749, 751, 755, 768, and 771 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, relative to the review of commitments of children on appeal." (Int. No. 39.)

"An act to authorize the Board of Claims to hear, audit and determine the claim of Delos F. Briggs for bounty under chapter 29 of the Laws of 1865, and the several acts amendatory thereof, and to make an award thereon." (Int. No. 51.)

"An act to authorize the bonding of school district No. 5, of the town of Flushing, in Queens county." (Int. No. 63.)

"An act to amend chapter 623 of the Laws of 1873, entitled 'An act to amend an act entitled An act in relation to the common schools in the village of Lockport,' passed March 31, 1847, and the acts amendatory thereof." (Int. No. 68.)

Mr. Erwin, from the committee on general laws, to which was referred the bill introduced by Mr. Saxton, Int. No. 6, entitled "An act to promote the independence of voters at public elections, enforce

the secrecy of the ballot and provide for the printing and distribution of ballots at public expense," reported in favor of the passage of the same, with amendments, which report was agreed to, and said bill committed to the committee of the whole.

Mr. Saxton moved that said bill be made a special order for Thursday morning, immediately after the reading of the journal.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agreee to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative, two-thirds of all the Senators present voting in favor thereof.

Mr. Erwin, from the committee on general laws, to which was referred the bill introduced by Mr. Saxton, Int. No. 5, entitled "An act to promote the purity and freedom of elections," reported in favor of the passage of the same, with amendments, and the title amended so as to read "An act to amend title 5 of the Penal Code, relating to crimes against the election franchise" which report was agreed to, and said bill committed to the committee of the whole. Mr. Saxton moved that said bill be made a special order for next Thursday morning.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative, two-thirds of all the Senators present voting in favor thereof.

Mr. Chase, from a minority of said committee, submitted the following report:

To the Senate:

I feel constrained to dissent from both the majority and minority reports of the committee on general laws in relation to the ballot reform bills, although it is with much reluctance that I assume a position which may, in the minds of some, seem to indicate an obstinate adherence to individual opinion. But while the committee all agree that such reform is necessary, only four members are in accord as to the methods of securing it, and as two others unite in advocating their particular views, I deem it only proper that I should submit for the consideration of the Senate the reasons why I am dissonance with both the majority and minority.

All right thinking men concede the necessity of a prompt and entire change in our elective system, and nowhere has the attention. of the public been so strongly drawn to the subject as in the annual message of Governor Hill to the Legislature, at the opening of the present session. He sums up the situation accurately and graphically, in these words: "These [the evils of intimidation and corruption flourish unchecked, bringing shame upon our State, rendering our elections a mockery, and threatening even the integrity and existence of our political institutions." In the face of this strong and truthful language, I feel it my duty to yield, as far as I consistently can, my individual preferences in matters of detail to the will of the majority, in order that some kind of effective legislation can be secured, believing this to be no time for dilatory and futile objections to what are on the whole the wise and seemingly adequate provisions of the so-called "Saxton" bill. But it seems to me that that measure is almost fatally defective in two or three most important particulars. It is simply a ballot reform act. What the [SENATE JOURNAL.]

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