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reductions in the number of personnel assigned to military assistance groups and missions.

In this connection, I recommend two specific legislative steps:

First. Legislation to provide the AID Administrator with authority to terminate a limited number of supervisory and policymaking employees notwithstanding other provisions of law, and to extend the existing Foreign Service "selection out" authority to other personnel.

This is essential if the Administrator is to carry out my desire-and that of the Congress-that he improve the quality of the AID staff, and at the same time, reduce its total size.

Second. Legislation to permit outstanding U.S. representation on the Inter-American Alliance for Progress Committee under the leadership of Ambassador Teodoro Moscoso.

Finally, I am appointing a general Advisory Committee, as suggested by Senator COOPER and others, on foreign economic and military assistance problems. It will be composed of distinguished private citizens with varied backgrounds and will serve as a continuing source of counsel to me. In addition to its general responsibility the Committee will examine aid programs in individual countries. These reviews will be made by members of the Advisory Committee, augmented as necessary by additional persons. I would hope that at least four or five country reviews, including two or three in Latin America, will be completed in the present year.

A PROGRAM TO STRENGTHEN THE FAMILY OF THE FREE

I am convinced this program will enable the United States to live in a turbulent world with a greater measure of safety and of honor.

There is in our heart the larger and nobler hope of strengthening the family of the free, quite apart from our duty to disappoint the evil designs of the enemies of freedom.

We wish to build a world in which the weak can walk without fear and in which even the smallest nation can work out its own destiny without the danger of violence and aggression.

This program, based on the principle of mutual help, can make an essential contribution to these purposes and objectives which have guided our Nation across the difficulties of these dangerous years.

I recommend this program to the judgment and the conscience of the Congress in the belief that it will enlarge the strength of the free world, aid in frustrating the ambitions of Communist imperialism, reduce the hazards of widespread conflict, and support the moral commitment of freemen everywhere to work for a just and peaceful world.

LYNDON B. JOHNSON. THE WHITE HOUSE, March 19, 1964.

MESSAGE FROM THE HOUSE A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Hackney, one of its reading clerks, announced that the

House had passed the following bills, in which it requested the concurrence of the Senate:

H.R. 1382. An act for the relief of John Gatzopi Overbeck and Mary Gatzopoulos Overbeck;

H.R. 1435. An act for the relief of Leon Llanos:

H.R. 1439. An act for the relief of Ioanna Ganas;

H.R. 1440. An act for the relief of Consuelo Alvarado de Corpus;

H.R. 1500. An act for the relief of Mrs. An Fu Wang Lee;

H.R. 2215. An act for the relief of E. A. Rolfe, Jr.;

H.R. 2229. An act for the relief of Louis Adler;

H.R. 3646. An act for the relief of Gordon

S. 1445. An act for the relief or Archie L. Dickson, Jr.;

H.R. 2189. An act for the relief of Morris Aronow and other employees of the Post Office Department;

H.R. 2724. An act for the relief of Davey Ellen Snider Siegel;

H.R. 4681. An act for the relief of CWO James A. McQuaig;

H.R. 5584. An act for the relief of Capt. Ransom C. Aplin;

H.R. 6748. An act for the relief of the J. D. Wallace & Co., Inc.; and

H.R. 8470. An act for the relief of Warren A. Jeffers and Francis H. Leik.

HOUSE BILLS REFERRED

The following bills were severally read

Liu Brooks, Jackie Lee Brooks, and Tony twice by their titles and referred as inTsui Brooks;

H.R. 3654. An act for the relief of Paolo Armano;

H.R. 4871. An act for the relief of Glen C. Deits and others;

H.R. 5416. An act for the relief of Irene N. Halkias;

H.R. 5514. An act to direct the Secretary of the Interior to sell certain public lands in the State of Arizona;

H.R. 6034. An act for the relief of Robert L. Johnston;

H.R. 6133. An act for the relief of Miss Carmen Rioja and child, Paloma Menchaca Rioja;

H.R. 6473. An act for the relief of Mr. and Mrs. Loward D. Sparks;

H.R. 6587. An act to direct the Secretary of the Interior to convey certain lands in Boulder County, Colo., to W. F. Stover;

H.R. 6837. An act for the relief of Mrs. Eleonora Vasconi (nee Trentanove);

H.R. 6883. An act for the relief of the estate of Eileen G. Foster;

H.R. 7346. An act for the relief of certain officers and employees of the U.S. Public Health Service;

H.R. 8201. An act for the relief of Maj. Jack J. Shea, U.S. Air Force;

H.R. 8348. An act for the relief of Mrs. Faye E. Russell Lopez;

H.R. 8469. An act for the relief of Dr. Salim Akyol;

H.R. 8532. An act for the relief of Ivan D. Beran;

H.R. 8936. An act for the relief of Leonard M. Dalton;

dicated:

H.R. 1382. An act for the relief of John Gatzopi Overbeck and Mary Gatzopoulos Overbeck;

H.R. 1435. An act for the relief of Leon Llanos;

H.R. 1439. An act for the relief of Ioanna Ganas;

H.R. 1440. An act for the relief of Consuelo Alvarado de Corpus;

H.R. 1500. An act for the relief of Mrs. An Fu Wang Lee;

H.R. 2215. An act for the relief of E. A. Rolfe, Jr.;

H.R. 2229. An act for the relief of Louis Adler;

H.R. 3646. An act for the relief of Gordon Liu Brooks, Jackie Lee Brooks, and Tony Tsui Brooks;

H.R. 3654. An act for the relief of Paolo Armano;

H.R. 4871. An act for the relief of Glen C. Deits and others;

H.R. 5416. An act for the relief of Irene N. Halkias;

H.R. 6034. An act for the relief of Robert L. Johnston;

H.R. 6133. An act for the relief of Miss Carmen Rioja and child, Paloma Menchaca Rioja;

H.R. 6473. An act for the relief of Mr. and Mrs. Loward D. Sparks;

H.R. 6837. An act for the relief of Mrs. Eleonora Vasconi (nee Trentanove);

H.R. 6883. An act for the relief of the estate of Eileen G. Foster;

H.R. 7346. An act for the relief of certain

H.R. 9573. An act for the relief of Wolfgang officers and employees of the U.S. Public Stresemann;

H.R. 9678. An act for the relief of Anna Maria Geyer;

H.R. 10078. An act for the relief of Philip N. Shepherdson;

H.R. 10300. An act to authorize certain construction at military installations, and for other purposes; and

H.R. 10433. An act making appropriations for the Department of the Interior and related agencies for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1965, and for other purposes.

ENROLLED BILLS SIGNED

The message also announced that the Speaker had affixed his signature to the following enrolled bills, and they were signed by the Acting President pro tempore:

S. 614. An act to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to make water available for a permanent pool for fish and wildlife and recreation purposes at Cochiti Reservoir from the San Juan-Chama unit of the Colorado River storage project;

S. 1299. An act to defer certain operation and maintenance charges of the Eden Valley Irrigation and Drainage District;

Health Service;

H.R. 8201. An act for the relief of Maj. Jack J. Shea, U.S. Air Force;

H.R. 8348. An act for the relief of Mrs. Faye E. Russell Lopez;

H.R. 8469. An act for the relief of Dr. Salim Akyol;

H.R. 8532. An act for the relief of Ivan D. Beran;

H.R. 8936. An act for the relief of Leonard M. Dalton;

H.R. 9573. An act for the relief of Wolfgang Stresemann;

H.R. 9678. An act for the relief of Anna Maria Geyer; and

H.R. 10078. An act for the relief of Philip N. Shepherdson; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

H.R. 5514. An act to direct the Secretary of the Interior to sell certain public lands in the State of Arizona; and

H.R. 6587. An act to direct the Secretary of the Interior to convey certain lands in Boulder County, Colo., to W. F. Stover; to the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs.

H.R. 10300. An act to authorize certain construction at military installations, and for other purposes; to the Committee on

Armed Services.

H.R. 10433. An act making appropriations for the Department of the Interior and related agencies for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1965, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Appropriations.

TRANSACTION OF ROUTINE
BUSINESS

Mr. MANSFIELD. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that there be the usual morning hour, with statements therein limited to 3 minutes.

The ACTING PRESIDENT pro tempore. Without objection, it is so ordered.

EXECUTIVE COMMUNICATIONS,

ETC.

The ACTING PRESIDENT pro tempore laid before the Senate the following letters, which were referred as indicated:

AMENDMENT OF FEDERAL CIVIL DEFENSE ACT OF 1950, RELATING TO PROVISION OF SHELTER

A letter from the Secretary of Defense, transmitting a draft of proposed legislation to further amend the Federal Civil Defense Act of 1950, as amended, to provide for shelter in Federal structures, to authorize payment toward the construction or modification of approved public shelter space, and for other purposes (with an accompanying paper); to the Committee on Armed Services. AMENDMENT OF TITLE 10, UNITED STATES CODE, RELATING TO DISPOSAL OF PERSONAL EFFECTS

OF CERTAIN PERSONS WHO DIE IN SERVICE A letter from the Secretary of the Air Force, transmitting a draft of proposed legislation to amend title 10, United States Code, to authorize officers detailed for the purpose to dispose of the personal effects of certain persons who die while serving with, employed by, or accompanying the Army or Air Force outside the United States (with an accompanying paper); to the Committee on Armed Services.

REPORT OF FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT

COMMISSION OF THE UNITED STATES

A letter from the Chairman, Foreign Claims Settlement Commission of the United States, Washington, D.C., transmitting, pursuant to law, a report of that Commission, for the 6-month period ended December 31, 1962 (with an accompanying report); to the Committee on Foreign Relations.

REPORT ON UNNECESSARY COST TO THE GOV-
ERNMENT IN LEASING OF CERTAIN ELEC-
TRONIC DATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS

A letter from the Comptroller General of the United States, transmitting, pursuant to law, a report on unnecessary cost to the Government in the leasing of electronic data processing systems by the Aerospace Division of Martin Marietta Corp., Baltimore, Md., Denver, Colo., Orlando, Fla., Department of Defense, dated March 1964 (with an accompanying report); to the Committee on Government Operations.

REPORT ON OVERPRICING OF THE NUCLEAR
FRIGATE U.S.S. "BAINBRIDGE"

A letter from the Comptroller General of the United States, transmitting, pursuant to law, a report on the overpricing of the nuclear frigate U.S.S. Bainbridge, purchased from the Bethlehem Steel Co., Quincy, Mass., Department of the Navy, dated March 1964 (with an accompanying report); to the Committee on Government Operations.

PETITIONS AND MEMORIALS
Petitions, etc., were laid before the
Senate, or presented, and referred as in-
dicated:

By the ACTING PRESIDENT pro tem-
pore:

A joint resolution of the Legislature of
the State of Arizona; to the Committee on
Commerce:

"HOUSE JOINT MEMORIAL 2

"Joint memorial urging the Congress of the
United States to enact legislation which
declares a moratorium and holds in abey-
ance the issuance of licenses or permits
under the Federal Power Act to construct
dams along the reach of the Colorado
River between Glen Canyon Dam and
Lake Mead during the period ending De-
cember 31, 1965

"To the Congress of the United States of
America:

"Your memorialist respectfully represents:
"Whereas the existing economy of the
State of Arizona cannot be sustained unless
the State's critically inadequate water sup-
ply is augmented by Colorado River water
and exchanges of water within the bound-
aries of the State therefor; and

"Whereas the Supreme Court has decreed that the State of Arizona is entitled to 2,800,000 acre-feet of water annually from the mainstream of the Colorado River; and "Whereas the Senate and the House of Representatives of the State of Arizona endorse the central Arizona project as a means of bringing the benefits of this water to the State of Arizona, regarding it as a necessity to survival, and viewing with grave concern any obstacles placed in the path of such project; and

"Whereas the Arizona congressional delegation is seeking in harmony the authorization of the central Arizona project as a Federal reclamation project; and

"Whereas there is now pending before the Congress of the United States legislation which has for its purpose the utilization by Arizona of its entitlement to the waters of the Colorado River; and

"Whereas the Senate and the House of Representatives of the State of Arizona have full confidence in the experience, integrity, and ability of the Arizona delegation to bring about the passage of such legislation; and

"Whereas the Arizona delegation deems it in the best interests of its efforts that the reach of the Colorado River beween Glen Canyon Dam and Lake Mead be and remain unencumbered for a reasonable period of time; and

"Whereas to keep such area unencumbered, it is only fair, reasonable and equitable that a time limit be established and that anything done shall not change or affect, for the purpose of any action which may be taken subsequent to such time limit, the present status, equities, position, rights or priorities of any applications now pending before any Federal agency; and

"Whereas time is of the essence and early action by the Congress of the United States is required to keep such reach of the Colorado River unencumbered;

"Wherefore your memorialist, the Senate and the House of Representatives of the State of Arizona, prays:

"1. That the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, enact legislation which provides that no licenses or permits shall be issued under the Federal Power Act (16 U.S.C. 791a-823) for the reach of the Colorado River between Glen Canyon Dam and Lake Mead during the period ending December 31, 1965; providing that nothing

therein shall change or affect for the purposes of any action which may be taken subsequent to such date the present status, equities, position, rights or priorities of any parties to applications now pending.

"2. That the Congress of the United States act speedily on any matters now pending or which may come before the Congress to insure that everything shall be done to bring the water and hydroelectric power resources in the Lower Basin of the Colorado River to the fullest development at the earliest possible date.

"3. That the secretary of state of the State of Arizona is directed to forthwith transmit copies of this resolution to the President of the Senate of the United States, to the Speaker of the House of Representatives of the United States, to the chairman of each congressional committee and subcommittee to which said legislation has been referred for consideration, to the Federal Power Commission and to each member of the Arizona congressional delegation.

"Passed the house March 16, 1964, by the following vote: 56 ayes, 13 nays, 11 not voting.

"Passed the senate March 16, 1964, by the following vote: 28 ayes, 0 nays, 0 not voting. "Approved by the Governor March 16,

1964.

"Filed in the office of the secretary of state, March 16, 1964."

A bill (senate bill 179) enacted by the Legislature of the State of South Dakota; to the Committee on Finance:

"SENATE BILL 179

"An act relating to the operation and effect of chapter 125 of the Session Laws of 1963, and declaring an emergency

"PREAMBLE

"Whereas chapter 125 of the Session Laws of 1963, relating to unemployment compensation benefits under the employment security law provided that the same shall become inoperative, null, and void if the U.S. Secretary of Labor, prior to January 8, 1964, finds such chapter not to conform to the requirements of the Social Security Act and the Unemployment Tax Act of the Internal Revenue Code;

"Whereas such Social Security Act and Unemployment Tax Act have specific provisions providing for notice and an opportunity to be heard to all States including the State of South Dakota prior to a finding by the U.S. Secretary of Labor that State acts such as chapter 125 do not conform to Federal standards; and

"Whereas no notice or hearing was given the State of South Dakota as a condition precedent under such Federal acts to a finding by the U.S. Secretary of Labor that chapter 125 of the Session Laws of 1963 did not conform to Federal standards; and

"Whereas on the 6th of January 1964, the Governor of South Dakota received from the U.S. Secretary of Labor a memorandum "finding" that the provisions of chapter 125 of the Session Laws of 1963 did not conform to applicable Federal standards; and

"Whereas it is the position of the State of South Dakota that chapter 125 of the Session Laws of 1963 is and has been operative and in full force and effect since January 15, 1964, for the reason that no finding of nonconformance was in fact or in law made by the U.S. Secretary of Labor; and

"Whereas the U.S. Secretary of Labor contends his memorandum without prior statutory notice and hearing constitutes a finding; and

"Whereas as a result of all of the above, a dispute exists between the sovereign State of South Dakota and the U.S. Secretary of Labor; and

"Whereas there is presently no statutory provision allowing the sovereign State of

South Dakota to seek clarification of such dispute in an impartial court of law; and "Whereas in order to demonstrate the good faith of the people of the sovereign State of South Dakota, it is hereby declared the policy of the Legislature of the State of South Dakota to make the provisions of chapter 125 of the Session Laws of 1963 inoperative for a limited period of time in order to give the Secretary of Labor an opportunity to follow the applicable Federal statutes relating to the conformity of State acts, thereby preserving comity between the sovereign State of South Dakota and the U.S.

Government; and

"Whereas to further that end, the Legislature of the State of South Dakota hereby grants the Governor of the State of South Dakota the power to declare such chapter 125 inoperative after such limited period of time:

"Therefore, be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of South Dakota:

"SECTION 1. The provisions of chapter 125 of the Session Laws of 1963 are hereby declared inoperative, retroactive from January 15, 1964 to and including June 30, 1964.

"SEC. 2. From and after July 1, 1964, the provisions of chapter 125 of the Session Laws of 1963 shall be operative unless the Governor of the State of South Dakota, on or before December 31, 1964, declares the same to be inoperative by certifying such declaration to the secretary of state and the commissioner and counsel of employment security.

"SEC. 3. Upon enactment, the secretary of state shall forward certified copies of this act to the President of the United States, the Vice President of the United States, all Members of the U.S. Congress, and the U.S. Secretary of Labor.

"SEC. 4. Whereas this act is necessary for the immediate support and preservation of the State government and its existing institutions, an emergency is hereby declared to exist, and this act shall be in full force and effect from and after its passage and approval.

"Approved February 13, 1964."

A joint resolution of the General Assembly of the State of Virginia; to the Committee on the Judiciary:

"HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION 90 "Joint resolution memorializing the Congress of the United States to call a convention to propose an amendment to the Constitution of the United States

"Resolved by the House of Delegates (the Senate of Virginia concurring), That the Congress of the United States is hereby memorialized to call a convention for the purpose of proposing the following article as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States:

"'ARTICLE —

""SECTION 1. No provision of this Constitution, or any amendment thereto, shall restrict or limit any State in the apportionment of representation in its legislature.

'SEC. 2. The judicial power of the United States shall not extend to any suit in law or equity, or to any controversy relating to apportionment of representation in a State legislature.

"SEC. 3. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States within 7 years from the date of its

submission.'

"Be it further resolved, That if Congress shall have proposed an amendment to the Constitution identical with that contained in this resolution prior to January one, nineteen hundred sixty-five, this application for a convention shall no longer be of any force or effect.

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A resolution of the House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Kentucky; to

the Committee on Public Works:

"HOUSE RESOLUTION 104 "Resolution petitioning the Congress of the United States to provide flood control measures for the Salt River and for Rolling Fork

"Whereas it is common knowledge that floods are frequent along the Salt River and Rolling Fork in general and in Bullitt and Hardin Counties and the southwestern part of Jefferson County in particular; and

"Whereas due to recent flooding in this area, the need for immediate flood control is appropriate: And now, therefore, be it

"Resolved by the House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Kentucky:

"SECTION 1. That the Congress of the United States is petitioned to enact the necessary legislation to effect the immediate Salt River and the Rolling Fork, particuconstruction of flood control measures on the Salt River and the Rolling Fork, particuflooded conditions in Bullitt and Hardin larly as such measure would alleviate the Counties and the southwestern part of Jef

ferson County.

"SEC. 2. That a copy of this resolution shall be sent by the chief clerk of this house of representatives to each U.S. Senator and Representative from Kentucky, to the Chief Clerk of the U.S. House of Repre

sentatives, to the Secretary of the U.S. Senate, to the U.S. Corps of Engineers, and to

the President of the United States."

A petition, signed by Hosei Hiyane, mayor of Kochinra-Son, Kosuke Kinjyo, chairman, Kosei Ishihara, chairman, Association of Municipal Assembly of Kochinra-Son, and Owners of Military-Used Lands in KochinraSon, all of the Island of Okinawa, praying for a quick solution of the prepeace treaty compensation issue; to the Committee on

Armed Services.

A resolution adopted by the Board of Chosen Freeholders of the County of Essex, N.J., favoring the enactment of the civil rights bill; ordered to lie on the table.

By Mr. PELL (for himself and Mr.
PASTORE):

A resolution of the General Assembly of the State of Rhode Island; to the Committee on Banking and Currency:

"H. RES 1309

"Resolution memorializing Congress respectfully requesting that the Housing and Home Finance Agency provide direct grants to local municipal agencies which have adopted approved urban renewal projects to assist them in carrying out all aspects of their workable program particularly minimum standards housing codes

"Resolved, That the Congress of the United States be memorialized and respectfully requested to direct the Housing and Home Fnance Agency to provide from the urban renewal fund direct grants to local municipal agencies which have adopted approved urban renewal projects to assist them in carrying out all aspects of their workable program and more particularly to aid them in enforcing local minimum housing standards codes; and be it further

"Resolved, That the secretary of state be and he hereby is requested to transmit duly certified copies of this resolution to the

Senators and Representatives from Rhode Island in the Congress of the United States in the hope that each will use every endeavor to carry out the purpose of this resolution."

REPORT ENTITLED "THE UNITED STATES BALANCE OF PAYMENTS"-REPORT OF A COMMITTEE-ADDITIONAL VIEWS (S. REPT. NO. 965)

Mr. DOUGLAS. Mr. President, from the Joint Economic Committee, I submit a report entitled "The United States Balance of Payments." I ask that the report be printed, together with the additional views. The report contains findings and recommendations based upon the extensive hearings and staff studies in 1963 on the balance of payments.

The ACTING PRESIDENT pro tempore. The report will be received and printed, as requested by the Senator from Illinois.

REPORT ON DISPOSITION OF
EXECUTIVE PAPERS

Mr. JOHNSTON, from the Joint Select Committee on the Disposition of Papers in the Executive Departments, to which was referred for examination and recom

mendation a list of records transmitted to the Senate by the Archivist of the United States, dated March 9, 1964, that appeared to have no permanent value or historical interest, submitted a report thereon, pursuant to law.

BILLS INTRODUCED

Bills were introduced, read the first time, and, by unanimous consent, the second time, and referred as follows:

By Mr. SALTONSTALL:

S. 2656. A bill for the relief of Michele Rizzuto; to the Committee on the Judiciary. By Mr. YOUNG of North Dakota: S. 2657. A bill to increase the amount of domestic beet sugar and mainland cane sugar which may be marketed during 1964, 1965, and 1966; to the Committee on Finance.

(See the remarks of Mr. YOUNG of North Dakota when he introduced the above bill, which appear under a separate heading.)

By Mr. FULBRIGHT (by request): S. 2658. A bill to amend further the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Foreign Relations.

(See the remarks of Mr. FULBRIGHT when he introduced the above bill, which appear under a separate heading.)

By Mr. FULBRIGHT:

S. 2659. A bill to provide for technical cooperation and development grants to less developed friendly countries and areas, and for other purposes;

S. 2660. A bill to provide for additional investment guaranties and surveys of investment opportunities under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and for other purposes;

S. 2661. A bill to authorize certain grant assistance under the Alliance for Progress, and for other purposes;

S. 2662. A bill to amend the United Nations Participation Act of 1945, as amended, and for other purposes;

S. 2663. A bill to authorize appropriations for supporting assistance pursuant to the terms of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and for other purposes;

S. 2664. A bill to authorize an appropriation to the President's Contingency Fund pursuant to the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and for other purposes;

S. 2665. A bill to provide for military assistance to friendly countries and international organizations, and for other purposes; Ind

S. 2666. A bill to provide for better adminIstration of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and for other purposes; o the Committee on Foreign Relations.

(See the remarks of Mr. FULBRIGHT when he introduced the above bills, which appear under a separate heading.)

By Mr. WILLIAMS of New Jersey:
S. 2667. A bill for the relief of Joaquim
Manuel De Oliveira; to the Committee on the
Judiciary.

INCREASED AMOUNT OF DOMESTIC

BEET SUGAR AND MAINLAND
CANE SUGAR WHICH MAY BE
MARKETED DURING 1964, 1965,
AND 1966

Mr. YOUNG of North Dakota. Mr. President, I introduce for appropriate reference, a bill to increase the amount of domestic beet sugar and mainland cane sugar which may be marketed during 1964, 1965, and 1966.

This bill would increase the basic beetsugar quota by 750,000 tons from the present 2,650,000 tons to 3,400,000. This increase is necessary because of action taken by the Department of Agriculture in requesting increased production for the years 1963, 1964, and 1965. This increase is in the interest of the U.S. sugar consumers and is particularly vital to American farmers who need sugar beets as a cash crop and as an alternative or replacement for crops now in surplus. This increase would also be most important to the welfare of factory and field labor in the 25 States in which the beet sugar industry is now located.

When Congress extended the Sugar Act in 1962, it provided for the erection of six new sugar beet processing plants in the period from 1963 through 1966. When early in 1963 a critical foreign sugar supply situation became apparent, the Department of Agriculture turned to the domestic beet sugar industry as the quickest dependable source of greater production, and announced that there would be no acreage restrictions on sugar beet planting in the years 1963, 1964, and 1965. The producers and the industry responded with immediate and substantial increases in production.

Mr. President, unless the basic beet sugar quota is increased, our established sugarbeet growers will be faced with a 40-percent cut in acreage. Equally alarming is the fact that the authorization of additional new beet sugar factories would no longer be possible. I believe it would be very unfair to thus penalize present growers who have contributed so importantly to the national sugar supply and at the same time prohibit sugarbeet production in new areas where the crop is so urgently needed.

Consumers are benefiting materially from the beet sugar industry's response to the congressional intent and executive requests. The industry produced a half million tons more sugar in 1963 than in

1962, and is in the process of producing
an additional quarter million tons of
sugar this year-thus contributing sub-
stantially to relieving the supply prob-
lem. Moreover, the beet sugar industry
has significantly recognized its obliga-
tions to consumers under the Sugar Act.
In 1963 beet sugar sold from $1 to $3 a
hundred pounds less than cane sugar in
the same markets. Both the volume and
price of beet sugar helped keep U.S.
prices of imported raw can sugar lower
than many other countries had to pay for
the same sugar.

By saving millions of dollars to U.S.
consumers in 1963, the beet sugar indus-
try was continuing its tradition of serving
consumers: beet sugar never sells for
more than cane sugar, and usually sells
for less.

Recognition of the importance of do-
mestic sugar production for American
consumers was given by President John-
son on January 31, 1964, when he urged
Congress to authorize unlimited 1964
marketing of
of domestically produced
sugar.

As I have stated, the extension of the
Sugar Act in 1962 provided for the erec-
tion of six new beet sugar processing
plants during the 4-year life of the act.
To protect the acreage allocation for
these plants and, at the same time to
protect the acreage of existing growers,
this legislation is badly needed.

Mr. President, the increase in the basic beet sugar quota and mainland sugar quota would be made without disturbing any of the present individual country quotas. The increase would come out of the so-called global quota. I believe that under changed world sugar supply-demand conditions it would appear undesirable to continue a system under which a large quantity of U.S. supplies is not specifically allocated.

Many changes have taken place in the sugar producing areas of the world since Congress passed the extension of the Sugar Act in 1962. There is no longer a world surplus of sugar. World reserve stocks of sugar which were substantial in mid-1962, are almost nonexistent. This was brought home very readily to the American housewife last summer when the price of sugar skyrocketed as the result of a scarcity of this very essential commodity.

Nearly one-third of world sugar production is under Communist control. Instability and political unrest plague many of the sugar producing nations of many of the sugar producing nations of the world. I believe, therefore, that in the world. I believe, therefore, that in this situation it is in the public interest to rely on the domestic sugarbeet industry for an additional 72 to 8 percent of our total sugar supplies, which this bill would provide. Even after adding 750,000 tons to the beet area quota, foreign countries would still be guaranteed onethird of the total U.S. market of about 10 million tons.

Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the bill be held at the desk through April 2 in order that other Senthrough April 2 in order that other Senators may have an opportunity to join me in sponsoring the bill.

The ACTING PRESIDENT pro tempore. The bill will be received and ap

propriately referred; and, without objection, the bill will lie on the desk, as requested by the Senator from North Dakota.

The bill (S. 2657) to increase the amount of domestic beet sugar and mainland cane sugar which may be marketed during 1964, 1965, and 1966, introduced by Mr. YOUNG of North Dakota, was received, read twice by its title, and referred to the Committee on Finance.

CONTINUATION OF THE FOREIGN
AID PROGRAM

Mr. FULBRIGHT. Mr. President, I introduce for appropriate reference sundry bills to provide for continuation of the foreign aid program.

One of these, which I introduce by request, is the bill requested by the President in his message to the Congress today. I am introducing it in order that the administration's bill may formally be before the Senate.

At the same time, on my own behalf, I introduce eight other bills dealing with the foreign aid program. I do this because it seems to me that, in view of our past experience with this subject in the Senate especially last year-and in view of the growing disillusionment with the catch-all program, the Senate is entitled to a new approach in its consideration of foreign aid.

The provisions of these eight bills are not inconsistent with the program proposed by the President. In fact, with one exception, the language of my bills is identical with that requested by the President. This exception has to do with contributions to international organizations. The President requested a specific dollar authorization for appropriations for fiscal 1965; I propose a continuing, tinuing, open-ended authorization of appropriations to be made to the Department of State. My bill would, however, continue the present law's percentage and other limitations on contributions to international organizations and programs. This particular facet of the foreign aid program is well established. In recent years, the administration has presented hard budget estimates which have rarely been changed by Congress. In these circumstances, I see no reason not to put the program on a permanent basis and save Congress the trouble of an annual review at both the authorizing and appropriating stages. Needless to say, under my proposal, the program would continue to require annual appropriations, which subjects the program to a thoroughgoing, rigorous, and extended examination.

With the exception of this authorization for contributions to international organizations, my bills follow the President's request. One of them deal with development grants and technical cooperation, one with investment guarantees and surveys of investment opportunities, one with grant assistance under the Alliance for Progress, one with supporting assistance, one with the contingency fund, one with military assistance, and one with administration.

The total appropriations authorized by my bills would be $782.2 millionplus, of course, whatever the Congress might subsequently decide to appropriate under the continuing authorizations for international organizations and military assistance. Upon further consideration, it may appear desirable to amend these proposals, either with respect to amounts or to substantive provisions.

I emphasize, however, that both my bills and the administration bill deal only with authorization. They are not They are not appropriations, which are a separate matter.

I have broken the foreign aid program into a number of bills, because I think the Foreign Relations Committee and the Senate ought to have the opportu

nity to consider separately each of the

items which have heretofore been considered in a single bill. This omnibus approach has led to a great deal of the confusion which surrounds the foreign aid program. As the Foreign Relations Committee has repeatedly pointed out, this program consists of a variety of diverse elements. I think that clarity and more intelligent decisionmaking will result if each of these elements is considered on its own merits, and the approach which I am suggesting today will contribute to that end.

Obviously, Mr. President, the decision as to whether this approach is adopted lies in the first instance with the Foreign Relations Committee and ultimately with the Senate. I hope that the committee can discuss the matter shortly after Easter.

The ACTING PRESIDENT pro tempore. The bills will be received and appropriately referred.

The bills, introduced by Mr. FULBRIGHT, were received, read twice by their titles, and referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations, as follows:

By Mr. FULBRIGHT (by request): S. 2658. A bill to amend further the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and for other purposes.

By Mr. FULBRIGHT:

S. 2659. A bill to provide for technical cooperation and development grants to less developed friendly countries and areas, and for other purposes;

S. 2660. A bill to provide for additional investment guarantees and surveys of investment opportunities under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and for other purposes;

S. 2661. A bill to authorize certain grant assistance under the Alliance for Progress, and for other purposes;

S. 2662. A bill to amend the United Nations Participation Act of 1945, as amended, and for other purposes;

S. 2663. A bill to authorize appropriations for supporting assistance pursuant to the terms of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and for other purposes;

S. 2664. A bill to authorize an appropriation to the President's contingency fund pursuant to the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and for other purposes;

S. 2665. A bill to provide for military assistance to friendly countries and international organizations, and for other purposes; and

S. 2666. A bill to provide for better administration of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, and for other purposes.

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ENROLLED BILLS PRESENTED

The Secretary of the Senate reported that on today, March 19, 1964, he pre

sented to the President of the United States the following enrolled bills:

S. 614. An act to authorize the Secretary permanent pool for fish and wildlife and of the Interior to make water available for a recreation purposes at Cochiti Reservoir from the San Juan-Chama unit of the Colorado River storage project;

S. 1299. An act to defer certain operation and maintenance charges of the Eden Valley Irrigation and Drainage District; and

S. 1445. An act for the relief of Archie L. Dickson, Jr.

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TEXTILE EXPORTS AND IMPORTS

Mr. SALTONSTALL. Mr. President, a conference of great importance to our domestic wool manufacturers was concluded in Paris on March 12, 1964. Representatives of American, Canadian, and European wool textile, knit goods, and apparel industries unanimously signed an accord calling for an early meeting of their Governments to seek an international trade agreement on wool textile products. I ask unanimous consent that two articles which appeared in the Daily News Record on March 13, 1964, concerning the Paris wool conference be printed in the RECORD as part of my remarks.

There being no objection, the articles were ordered to be printed in the RECORD, as follows:

UNANIMOUS ACCORD REACHED AT PARIS
INTERNATIONAL WOOL PARLEY

(By James W. Brady) PARIS.-The Paris Wool Conference ended in unanimous agreement Thursday night.

American, Canadian, and European delegates signed an accord calling for an early meeting of their Governments to negotiate an international trade agreement.

Wool textiles, knit goods, and apparel industry representatives from 14 nations framed the following three-part resolution:

"That there is a recognized need for an early agreement among Governments covering world trade in the products of the in

dustries involved, irrespective of the fibers contained in these products.

"That each of the above-mentioned indus

tries request the prompt convening of an international meeting of all Governments concerned for the purpose of concluding such an agreement."

"That each of the above-mentioned industries suggest to its Government measures that each considers appropriate to achieve this end."

The 13-man U.S. delegation was jubilant at the outcome of the 2-day Paris session. As they caucused late Thursday evening in the Hotel George V after adjournment of the final session, they were using words like "historic *** dramatic ✶✶✶ precedent making" to describe the Paris accord.

This contrasted sharply with the first day of negotiations, when Europeans and Americans appeared far apart.

Co., Boston, acted as the U.S. delegation spokesman at the session.

Morton H. Darman, president of the Top

"We are greatly encouraged by the outcome of the Paris meeting," Mr. Darman said. "It follows a meeting in Rome last December at which only segments of the

European industry were present.

"The purpose of the Paris meeting was to permit the Europeans to include their total wool industry as we in the United States did. And while there were doubts at the conclusion of the Rome meeting as to what position the total European industry might take, those doubts are now resolved.

"It is our intention to communicate the results of this meeting promptly to appropriate Government officials and to Members

of Congress, and it is our expectation that

the climate generated at this Paris meeting will prove useful in enabling the governments of all the countries concerned to meet

at an early date and resolve the mutual problems of the industry through an international agreement of governments."

Mr. Darman was asked whether the governmental meeting proposed might possibly be convened before the Kennedy round of GATT negotiations, which begin May 4 in Geneva. He said timing was up to the governments involved.

Asked if further meetings modeled on the Rome and the Paris wool conferences were planned, Mr. Darman said, "We see no further need for industry-to-industry conver

sations-that is, we the Americans. "We cannot speak for the Europeans."

To the question of whether import quotas, market disruption concepts, or other trade details were decided upon during the Paris talks, the American spokesman replied:

"We did not come here to settle on details-that's for the governments to do. Our own industry position is well known, has not

changed, and will be reaffirmed to our Government upon our return."

Other delegates were less specific on their own national reactions to the Paris accordas it probably will be known at least in

Europe but it was clear they were all

pleased to have been able to find a common ground with the Americans.

In answer to questions, delegates said there was no logical relationship between the worldwide wool pact they now want the governments to hammer out and the GATT long-term agreement on cotton textiles. American delegates also said there was no discussion of whether wool textiles should be excluded from the Kennedy round.

Most U.S. industry leaders plan to return to America today. It is expected that early meetings will be scheduled with officials in Washington.

TEXT OF ACCORD

PARIS.-Here is the text of the Paris Wool Conference accord:

"The wool textile, knit goods, and apparel industries of Austria, Denmark, Norway,

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