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THE HOUSE WHERE THOMAS PAINE LIVED IN NEW YORK, 309 BLEECKER STREET,

WEATHEN-BEATEN AND ABOUT ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS OLD, BUT STILL STANDING

most patriotic sentiments in American literature. Many of these are as pertinent to America's present struggle as when written nearly one hun dred and fifty years ago. This quotation is from The Crisis :

It is the object only of war that makes it honourable. And if there was ever a

just war since the world began, it is this in which America is now engaged. "

Prescience might almost be attributed to the author of these words, also in The Crisis :

We fight not to enslave but to set a country free, and to make room upon the earth for honest men to live in.

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he knew life, for his knowledge was gained not in the artificial seclusions of the universities, but amid the realities of the world. Who shall say how far this circumstance contributed to give his subsequent work that force and tone of human reality which has caused his social philosophy to exercise such an influence on

Gladstone, and secured a position in the Inland Revenue Department at Somerset House. This was in 1877, and for the first period of his life, until the appearance, in 1894, of his first book, Social Evolution, he remained utterly unknown to fame, and even his closest associates had no idea that he was in any way destined ever to be more than an ordinary civil servant with the ordinary interests and ambitions of a man in his position.

But from the beginning, behind outward appearances there existed a personality and a mind moved to tremendous efforts by an absorbing passion for knowledge. In his early years in London, Kidd was entirely alone and dependent on his own resources, which did not amount at first to more than about £80 per annum. His family were unable to give him any financial support. Although in after years it was with the greatest difficulty that he could be brought to allude to this period of his life, there is no doubt that he fought for knowledge at the cost of food and clothing, and that he even resorted to money-lenders in order to obtain the necessary fees to attend evening classes in science. He spent three years reading for the bar in his spare time after office hours, and gained a thorough grasp of the law, only to abandon the project finally on the realisation of the insufficiency of his means. He then read for the consular service, but this project also fell through for a different reason. The age qualifications were altered suddenly in such a way that he found himself excluded. Yet his main purpose was accomplished. He had become gradually master of a wide and varied knowledge of science, philosophy, literature and art. Above all

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new book, The Way Out of War, will not be the psychologist or the the doctor says in effect that in- sociologist, but the jurist or the biolstead of trying to cultivate the ogist who will construct the Magna goodwill of the other nations, the Charta of peace for the nations of Prussians are now trying to smash to-morrow. them, and this, carried to its logical conclusion, means that she is done for.

When Mary Roberts Rinehart "Prussia,” he asserts, “is proto- and her family went through Glacier plasmically senile. In fact, any na

Park and across the tion that deliberately wages aggres- Mrs. Rinehart's Cascade Mountains sive war is abnormal, for war is al

“Creed"
"C

on horseback, the ways a symptom of deficient brain

party stopped one development. ... The relation day at Kalispell in Montana. Mrs. of war to the species is that of a de- Rinehart wore an old felt hat, much structive process in all of its final the worse for weather and fish hooks. phases. The reason for that is be- Sitting her horse, she was surveying cause it exhausts a part of the fund the hat ruefully while she purchased of vital energy which belongs by nat- a new one—"a cowgirl affair,” she ural inheritance to the germ plasm. calls it. “Suddenly,” she says, “a

“Warfare by arms will probably gentleman I had never seen before, continue for some centuries, yet, in but who is green in my memory, all probability, with ever-lengthening stepped forward and presented me periods of peace. According to the with his own hat band. It was of laws of continuity, order in nature leather, and it bore this vigorous indicates that in the end a world and inspiring inscription: ‘Give 'er state will emerge, following the al- pep and let 'er buck! ” In Tenting ready accomplished union of states Tonight, Mrs. Rinehart tells the in larger and larger groups since the story of the hat band, and adds: day of small tribes and clans.” “To-day, when I am low in my mind,

The author thinks, too, that it I take that cowgirl hat from its re

e fund

the new one man denty" she sa refore,

treat and read its inscription: “Give ’er pep and let 'er buck!' It is a whole creed"

One of the most curious and colourful incidents of the war, and an inci

The Famous dent which illusFalling Virgin trates in a striking Caught in and picturesque Passing

ings made by artists at the front, is presented in one of the pictures by Muirhead Bone, and reproduced in the publication, The Western Front, the collection of his work done for the British Government. Mr. Bone has made a drawing of the Albert Church tower, famous for its impending figure of the Virgin, knocked by artillery fire into a singular diving attitude; the Virgin concerning which the legend arose that when

MADE BY spicer-simio N or

Note The RESULT or WEARING THE FAMOUS

“JIMMIE” whistLER, HAs INTRODUCED INTO THIS

way the incalculable historical value of the official draw

Photo by Van der Weyde, New York.

A bust of vance Thompson,

PARIs.

Monocle, A custom THAT, IN spite of MRs. THoMPson,

OF MAC MON NIES AND OF
Neven been successfulLY

country.

MR. THoMPson's ARTICLE, “striNDBERG AND

HIS PLAYs,” APPEARS IN THIS ISSUE

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