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CAVALRY OF THE Clouds. By Cap- AMERICAN WOMEN AND THE WORLD tain Alan Bott, M.C.

WAR. By Ida Clyde Clark. Experiences of a very young newspaper

A complete story of American women's man who joined the Air Corps; he early part in war work. prophesied the great part the airplane would have in winning the war.

AMBULANCE 464. By Julien H.

Bryan. BLOWN IN BY THE DRAFT. By Fra

"This is my first book,” says Mr. Bryan, zier Hunt.

a lad of eighteen, "and I have tried to tell Chronicles of the author's observations

as simply as possible a few of the many as a newspaper correspondent in the great

things which happened to our section ‘over National Army Cantonment at Camp Upton; the making of a great American national army through conscription.

INSIDE THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION.

By Rheta Childe Dorr. COMRADES IN COURAGE. By Lieut. A vivid personal narrative of the author's Antoone Redier.

actual experiences in Russia-conditions,

individuals, and interviews. A book to inspire a soldier to fight with devotion and courage.

THE OLD FRONT LINE. By John S. 0. S. STAND To! By Sergeant

Masefield. Reginald Grant.

His account is vivid. Through the eyes

of a great poet, the reader sees the old A young gunner's experiences during front line as it was when the great battle three years under hell-fire in the front line of the Somme began. trenches of the Somme.

A WAR NURSE'S DIARY. Illustrated. OUT THERE. By Charles W. Whitehair.

High courage, deep sympathy without

sentimentality and an all-saving sense of A Y. M. C. A. man's three years' ex

humour are the salient features of this litperiences on all fronts.

tle book.

FICTION

THE A. E. F.-With Pershing's

Army. By Heywood Broun. A true account of what happened to the boys who made up the first unit of the American Expeditionary Force in France, given by a war correspondent who went to Paris with them.

THE U. P. TRAIL. By Zane Grey.

A transcontinental story, as big as from East to West, a tale of the buoyant, passionate days of youth in which we see built the first great railroad, from the surveys to the final silver spike.

DRIFTING WITH BROWNE. By Byers

Fletcher. A delightful bit of reminiscing about prewar days by a soldier convalescing after the push on the Somme.

A SURGEON IN ARMs. By Capt. R.

J. Manion, M.D.M.C.
A Canadian surgeon's experiences with
the medical corps on the Western front.
UNDER Four FLAGS FOR FRANCE.

By Capt. George Clarke Mus

grave. A complete history of the war from the American point of view.

Miss AMERIKANKA. By Olive Gil

breath. This romance of an American girl in Russia during the beginning of the war, reveals the soul of the Russia that has passed, and helps in understanding the Russia that is to come. THE YELLOW Dog. By Henry Irv

ing Dodge. A story for all patriotic Americans. One that will help them to unearth the "yellow dogs" who lurk round every corner, dropping an unpatriotic word here or a seditious remark there. A piece of splendid patriotism and a corking book.

GASLIGHT SONATAS. By Fannie

Hurst. Women's hearts are what she uncovers in * her new book. Selfish and self-denying,

frivolous and simple, all beat with life, each in its own rhythm of femininity. My Boy in Khaki. By Della Thomp

son Lutes. A story of a mother who must give up her son and realizes that this is the right thing to do; a remarkable message of comfort to every American mother.

THE DEVIL TO Pay. By Frances

Nimmo Greene. A thrilling story of love and mystery beginning with the execution of a cashier for murder and the indictment of the bank president for complicity, and ending with many surprises. Miss Pim's CAMOUFLAGE. By Lady

Stanley. A story of humour and adventure, about a British spinster's part in the war.

THE GIRL IN His House. By Har

old MacGrath. An Arabian Nights mystery in modern New York. A rich clubman, a taxi-cab, a respectable house—and presto! there is a mystery fit for a king.

MARY REGAN. By Leroy Scott.

The adventures of a member of the criminal aristocracy: as Life puts her to the test, a new Mary Regan is developed which she did not guess existed in herself.

THE STATUE IN THE Wood. By

Richard Pryce. A story with the same qualities of sympathy and delicacy which characterise the author's other work, and with a singularly penetrating knowledge of woman's nature.

THE UNPARDONABLE Sın. By Ru

pert Hughes. A novel based on the brutality of the German soldiers toward defenceless women in the war zone and especially in Belgium. The plot is woven round two American women caught by the invaders in a Belgium convent and a third woman, who attempts to save them.

THE AIR-MAN AND THE TRAMP. By

Jennette Lee. A bit of real romance about a lonely heiress in a big old house, with a great deal of mystery which is happily cleared up in the wind-up.

You No Longer Count. By Rene

Boylesve. A translation of the story which took Paris by storm-of the transformation of a woman after the loss of her officer husband: a theme of self not so much sacrificed as splendidly extinguished by the tragedy of the war. THE EARTHQUAKE. By Arthur

Train. The adventures and reactions of a typical American family, who finding that America was not only "at war," but “in” the war to the hilt, proceeded, each member in his own way, to do his bit. FIVE TALES. By John Galsworthy.

Very real stories, intense in feeling and action-each built about a single dominant figure.

IMPOSSIBLE PEOPLE. By Mary C. E.

Wemyss. Humour and sentiment make charming this characteristic story of the author, in which an unconventional and entirely human married pair involve a group of young people in their affairs. THE STANDARD-BEARERS. By Kath

erine Mayo. Tales of the Pennsylvania constabularythe types of adventure which make up the day's work of State cavalrymen. Some of these stories have appeared in the Atlantic Monthly and the Saturday Evening Post. Nobody's Child. By Elizabeth De

jeans. A dramatic novel built on family antagonism. From the clash of powerful personalities grows a passionate love story. OVER HERE. By Ethel M. Kelly.

The story of a war bride-a romance of sacrifice. THE HOUSE OF INTRIGUE. By Ar

thur Stringer. A sit-up-all-night-till-you-finish-it story about a young man with something up his sleeve, and a girl who may be either a crook or a crook-catcher until the last chapter.

THE WHITE MORNING. By Gertrude THE PRETTY LADY. By Arnold
Atherton.

Bennett.
An exciting novel of the German revolu The author in a new mood, with all his
tion that may come.

human lovable qualities in high relief; he

deals with certain aspects of social life at THE RIDER IN KHAKI. By Nat home in West End London during the war, Gould.

sympathetically interpreting the experiences

of a rich bachelor of fifty.
This novel of racing and adventure in
the war, introduces the author to America.

CASTE THREE. By Gertrude M.

Shields.
SOLDIER'S Both. By Gustave
Guiches.

A fascinating story of small-town life in

the Middle West, in which a young man of A story of France's call to arms—one to pseudo-intellectual ambitions is led to military duty and the other to the soil change his ideas. and of two men who answer it.

SECRET BREAD. By F. Tennyson THE HOUSE OF CONRAD. By Elias

Jesse (new and revised edition). Tobenkin.

An impressive work of recent English ficThe story of the great forces of national tion--the life drama of a man and his search ism about to break in America—the uncon for spiritual rest, the "secret bread" by scious processes of Americanisation at work which all men live. upon the souls of immigrants.

THE SPY IN BLACK. By J. Storer
E. K. MEANS.

Clouston.
The name of a writer of Louisiana negro
stories whose work is so characteristic as

A tale of secret service, plots, and Gerto need no other title.

man spies-beginning with the landing of

a U-boat on an English coast, with a draA GIRL ALONE. By H. Evans.

matic climax in a house on the cliffs. A story of a plucky young woman in NOCTURNE. By Frank Swinnerton. London who beat the world that tried to crush her.

Events occurring in a single night, in

volving five or six characters. H. G. Wells THE SECRET OF THE MARNE. By

says, “It is a book that will not die.” Marcel Berger and Maud Berger. PIECES OF Eight. By Richard LeHow Sergeant Fritsch saved France Gallienne. a novel built around the events of the

A modern tale of buried treasure and the glorious Marne week and reading like a detective story.

West Indies, with the word painting of the

poet-a story to make the reader forget the Just OUTSIDE. By Stacy Aumonier. collapse of Russia, the H.C.L., and other

things of the kind. The struggle between personality and environment set forth in this author's latest THE MAKING OF GEORGE GROTON. novel, will appeal especially to a person of moods—in fact to people who are not

By Bruce Barton. merely motivated vegetables.

The story of an average man's success in

business and in love.
THE HAPPIEST TIME OF THEIR
LIVES. By Alice Duer Miller.

THE THREE OF HEARTS. By Berta
A love story of the smart set of New

Ruck (Mrs. Oliver Onions). York, dealing with the idea of whether The amusing trials of a British infantrysheltered women are stronger or weaker in man who proposed to three girls in one a crisis than their independent sisters. evening and was accepted by all three. The Return of the SOLDIER. By The Graftons. By Archibald MarRebecca West.

shall. An English love story of poignancy and More about the delightful English family splendour, with the background of the war; introduced in Abington Abbey—though in its plot is unique in fiction.

no sense a sequel to that story.

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THE NE'ER-Do-Much. By Eleanor

Hallowell Abbott, A fanciful tale of a dinner-party given to America's celebrities, with interest centred on four of the guests who tried to hide their identity.

FlooD TIDE. By Daniel Chase.

The story of a man essentially a student and dreamer, forced by circumstances into a business career: his success, the price which he pays for it, and the way in which he ultimately achieves happiness.

OLD PEOPLE AND THE THINGS THAT

Pass. By Louis Couperus. The remarkable story of two aged people, the secret of whose youth they alone knew -- they thought.

THE WITCH AND OTHER STORIES.

By Anton Chekhov. Sixteen fascinating stories of peasant life, each arresting in theme and done in the celebrated Russian author's besť manner.

GUDRID THE Fair. By Maurice THE FLYING TEUTON. By Alice Hewlett.

Brown. A romance of Icelandic heroes and lovers

A collection of stories several of which in old Norse days.

have to do with the war. The one giving its title to the book has been called by Mr.

O'Brien one of the best stories that has POTTERAT AND THE WAR: A Novel.

yet come out of the war, and one of the By Benjamin Vallotton.

five best short stories published in 1917. A story of the war's harrying effect on a big-hearted Swiss-called by the French THE WIFE AND OTHER STORIES. By "Mr. Britling.”

Anton Chekhov. GREAT GHOST STORIES. Edited by

Nine stories presenting various aspects of

the life of the educated class in Russia, J. L. French.

and showing Chekhov at his best in char

acter analysis. Collected from the works of writers of first rank-genuine adventures into the realm of the supernatural.

First THE BLADE. By Clemence

Dane. TALES OF WARTIME FRANCE. Trans.

A “Comedy of Growth”—the humourous by William L. McPherson. story of two people who are in love and of

their development under the influence of Examples of the best work produced in

their emotions. France under the stimulus of the warmasterpieces, many of them by unknown authors.

Foe-FARRELL. By Quiller-Couch.

A psychological study of the transformaTHE TIME SPIRIT. By J. C. Snaith. tion of character: also a rousing story of

adventure which takes the principal charThe story of a little foundling who suc acters around the world, and involves a ceeds in overcoming class distinctions in

number of interesting and unusual people. England.

His SECOND WIFE. By

By Ernest THE WAY OUT. By Emerson

Poole. Hough.

A story of the struggle between two This is the story of the regeneration of

wives-one living, and the other dead, but the "Shut-In” district of the Cumberlands.

still strongly making her presence felt. It is based on fact.

THE TREE OF HEAVEN. By May THE BAG OF SAFFRON. By Bettina

Sinclair. von Hutten.

The story of how the war comes to a The Baroness von Hutten answers the typical English family who are sacrificing question of what gives a woman happiness their all in the cause of democracy. Never and tells the story of a woman's regenera has the author's ability in character analytion.

sis been more clearly evidenced.

MISCELLANEOUS

THE VOICE OF LINCOLN. By Judge

R. M. Wanamaker. A narrative text of biographical and historical significance. Lincoln's character and genius as revealed in his letters, conversations, and speeches.

THE MARTIAL ADVENTURES OF

HENRY AND ME. By William

Allen White. The experiences of two Red Cross men at the front: the combination of the humourous and the significant, makes a book that is extraordinarily worth while. THE BOARDMAN FAMILY. By Mary

S. Watts. Many novels have been written about people of genius who rise to fame through the most dreadful struggles and privations. Mrs. Watts begins at the other end of the scale and presents a young woman who did not need to have any trials and could have stayed at home and been taken care of, had she so chosen.

TENTING TONIGHT. By Mary Rob

erts Rinehart. The author's trip through the mountains of the West, giving the reader by proxy the delights of camping and hunting.

IN AUDUBN's LABRADOR. By Dr.

Charles Wendell Townsend. For nature lovers: an account of a summer cruise along the southern coast of Labrador.

HISTORY

NATIONAL PROGRESS. By Prof.

Frederick A. Ogg. This new volume of The American Nation, edited by Professor Hart, of Harvard, furnishes an authoritative and compact history of the last decade, 1907-1917.

CAPE COD, NEW AND OLD. By Agnes

Edwards. A charming and convenient collection of essays for the tourist.

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