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try; every little neighbour, desirous of reaping profit from his easiness of temper, laid some pretended claim to his lands, and he had twenty law-suits on his hands in consequence of his endeavouring to avoid one. To remedy this he fold his estate ; but here he was in another error.He knew not what to do with his money.--He was advised to venture it in purchasing a share in a valuable mine.--The

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of the affair was a man of gaiety and address; he trusted his money in his hands; but all that gaiety, all that address, preserved him not from breaking in a twelve-month's time. This event ruined Mondor ;-he saw the insignificancy of all sublunary things; he fled to a melancholy retirement, where he pined away and died with mere vexation. This was his greatest and last of errors.

THE GIFT.

TO IRIS, IN BOW-STREET, COVENT-GARDEN.

BY DR, GOLDSMITH,

SAY, cruel Iris, pretty rake,

Dear mercenary beauty,
What annual off'ring shall I make,

Expreslive of my duty.

My

My heart, 'a victim to thine eyes,

Should I at once deliver,
Say, would the angry fair one prize

The gift, who flights the giver ?

A bill, a jewel, watch, or toy,

My rivals give—and let 'em. If gems, or gold, impart a joy,

I'll give them when I get 'em,

I'll give--but not the full-blown rose,

Or rofe-bud more in fashion;
Such short-liv'd off rings but disclose

A transitory paflion.

I'll give thee something yet unpaid,

Not less fincere, than civil :
I'll give thee-Ah! too charming maid

;
I'll give thee-to the devil,

AN AN EL EGY

ON THE GLORY OF HER SEX,

MRS. MARY BLAIZE.

BY THE SAME.

GOOD people all, with one accord,

Lament for madam Blaize, Who never wanted a good word

From those who spoke her praise.

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The needy feldom pass'd her door,

And always found her kind She freely lent to all the poor,

Who left a pledge behind,

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She strove the neighbourhood to please,

With manners wond'rous winning, And never follow'd wicked ways,

Unless when she was finning,

At church, in silks and fattins new,

With hoop of monstrous size, She never flumber'd in her pew,

But when she fbut ber eyes.

Her

Her love was fought, I do aver,

By twenty beaus and more; The king himself has follow'd her,

When she has walk'd before.

But now her wealth and fin'ry Aled,

Her hangers-on cut short all;
The doctors found, when she was dead,

Her laft disorder mortal.

Let us lament, in forrow fore,

For Kent-Street well may say,
That had the liv'd a twelve-month more,

She had not dy'd to day.

SABINUS AND OLINDA.

BY THE SAME.

IN a fair, rich and flourishing country, whose

cliffs are washed by the German ocean, lived Sabinus, a youth formed by nature to make a conquest wherever he thought proper ; but the constancy of his disposition fixed him only with Olinda. He was, indeed, superior to her in fortune, but that defect on her side was so amply supplied by her--merit, that none was thought more worthy of his regards than the. He loved her, he was beloved by her; and, in a short time, by joining hands publickly, they avowed the union of their hearts. But, alas ! none, however fortunate, however happy, are exempt from the shafts of envy, and the malignant effects of ungoverned appetite. How unsafe, how detestable, are they, who have this fury for their guide. How certainly will it lead them from themselves, and plunge them in errors they would have shuddered at, even in apprehension. Ariana, á lady of many amiable qualities, very nearly allied to Sabinùs, and highly esteemed by him, imagined herself flighted, and injuriously treated, since his marriage with Olinda. By uncautiously suffering this jealousy to corrode in her breast, she began to give a loose to passion; she forgot those many virtues, for which she had been so long, and so justly applauded. Causeless suspicion, and mistaken resentment, betrayed her, inte all the gloom of discontent; she fighed without ceasing; the happiness of others gave her intolerable pain; she thought of nothing but revenge. How unlike what she was, the cheerful, the prudent, the compassionate Ariana !

She continually laboured to disturb an union so firmly, so affectionately founded, and planned every scheme which she thought most likely to difturb it.

Fortune seemed willing to promote her unjust intentions; the circumstances of Sabinus had

been

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