Слике страница
PDF
ePub

SWEDEN AND NORWAY.

(Sweden, page 1724. Norway, page 1300.).

1816.4

TREATY OF AMITY AND COMMERCE.

Concluded September 4, 1816; ratification advised by the Senate with

amendments February 19, 1817; ratified by the President May 27, 1818; ratifications exchanged September 25, 1818; proclaimed December 31, 1818.

ARTICLES.

I. Liberty of commerce.
II. Discrimination in duties.
III. Not ratified by Senate.
IV. Not ratified by Senate.

V. Consuls.
VI. Not ratified by Senate.
VII. Vessels in port without unload-

ing.

VIII. Duties on parts of cargo.
IX. Rights of entrepot.

X. Shipwrecks.
XI. Quarantine.
XII. Treaty of 1783.
XIII. Blockade.
XIV. Ratification.

In the name of the Most Holy and Indivisible Trinity.

The United States of America and His Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway, equally animated with a sincere desire to maintain and confirm the relations of friendship and commerce which have hitherto subsisted between the two States, and being convinced that this object cannot be more effectually accomplished than by establishing, reciprocally, the commerce between the two States upon the firm basis of liberal and equitable principles, equally advantageous to both countries, have named to this end Plenipotentiaries, and have furnished them with the necessary full powers to treat, and in their name to conclude a treaty, to wit:

The President of the United States, Jonathan Russell, a citizen of the said United States, and now their Minister Plenipotentiary at the Court of Stockholm; and His Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway, His Excellency the Count Laurent d’Engeström, his Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Chancellor of the University of Lund, Knight Commander of the Orders of the King, Knight of the Order of Charles XIII, Grand Cross of the Orders of St. Etienne of Hungary, of the Legion of Honour of France, of the Black Eagle and of the Red Eagle of Prussia, and the Count Adolphe George de Mörner, his Counsellor of State, and Commander of the Order of the Polar Star;

a This treaty expired by its own limitations September 25, 1826, and was replaced by the treaty of 1827. See letters of Swedish and Norwegian ministers, respectively, as to treaties with those countries, pp. 1724-1300,

And the said Plenipotentiaries, after having produced and exchanged their full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed on the following articles:

ARTICLE I. There shall be between all the territories under the dominion of the United States of America, and of His Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway, a reciprocal' liberty of commerce. The inhabitants of either of the two countries shall have liberty, with all security for their persons, vessels, and cargoes, to come freely to all ports, places, and rivers within the territories of the other, into which the vessels of the most favored nations are permitted to enter. They can there remain and reside in any part whatsoever of the said territories; they can there hire and occupy houses and warehouses for their commerce; and, generally, the merchants and traders of each of the two nations shall enjoy in the other the most complete security and protection for the transaction of their business, being bound alone to conform to the laws and statutes of the two countries, respectively.

ARTICLE II. No other or higher duties, imposts, or charges, whatsoever, shall be imposed on the importation into the territories of His Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway, of the produce or manufactures of the United States, nor on the importation into the United States of the produce or manufactures of the territories of His Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway, than those to which the same articles would be subjected in each of the two countries, respectively, if these articles were the growth, produce, or manufacture, of any other country. The same principle shall likewise be observed in respect to exportation, in such manner that in each of the two countries, respectively, the articles which shall be exported for the other, cannot be charged with any duty, impost, or charge, whatsoever, higher or other than those to which the same articles would be subjected if they were exported to any other country whatever.

Nor shall any prohibition be imposed on the exportation or importation of any article, the growth, produce, or manufacture, of the territories of His Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway, or of the United States, to or from the said territories of His Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway, or to or from the said United States, which shall not equally extend to all other nations.

Swedish or Norwegian vessels arriving in ballast, or importing into the United States the produce or manufactures of their countries, or exporting from the United States the produce or manufactures of saíd States, shall not be obliged to pay, either for the vessels or the cargoes, any other or higher duties, imposts, or charges, whatsoever, than those which the vessels of the United States would pay in the same circumstances; and, vice versa, the vessels of the United States, arriving in ballast, or importing into the territories under the dominion of His Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway the produce or manufactures of the United States, or exporting from the territories under the dominion of His Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway the produce or manufactures of these territories, shall not pay, either

24449_VOL 2-10-33

for the vessels or the cargoes, any other or higher duties, imposts, or charges, whatsoever, than those which would be paid if these articles were transported by Swedish or Norwegian vessels, respectively.

That which is here above stipulated shall also extend to the Swedish colony of St. Barthelemy, as well in what relates to the rights and advantages which the vessels of the United States shall enjoy in its ports, as in relation to those which the vessels of the colony shall enjoy in the ports of the United States, provided the owners are inhabitants of St. Barthelemy, and there established and naturalized, and shall have there caused their vessels to be naturalized.

ARTICLE III.[His Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway agrees that all articles the growth, produce, or manufacture, of the West Indies, which are permitted to be imported in Swedish or Norwegian vessels, whether these articles be imported, directly or indirectly, from said Indies, may be likewise imported into its territories in vessels of the United States, and there shal :ot be paid, either for the said vessels or the cargoes, any higher or other duties, imposts, or charges, whatsoever, than those which would be paid by Swedish or Norwegian vessels in the same circumstances, with an addition only of ten per centum on the said duties, imposts, and charges, and no more.

[In order to avoid misapprehension in this respect, it is expressly declared, that the term “ West Indies” ought to be taken in its most extensive sense, comprising all that portion of the earth, whether mainland or islands, which at any time has been denominated the West Indies, in contradistinction to that other portion of the earth denominated the East Indies.]

ARTICLE IV.

[The United States of America, on their part, agree that all articles the growth, produce, or manufacture, of the countries surrounding the Baltic Sea, or bordering thereon, which are permitted to be imported in vessels of the United States, whether these articles be imported, directly or indirectly, from the Baltic, may likewise be imported into the United States in Swedish or Norwegian vessels; and there shall not then be paid for the said vessels, or for the cargoes, any higher or other duties, imposts, or charges, whatsoever, than those which would be paid by vessels of the United States in the same circumstances, with an addition only of ten per centum on the said duties, imposts, and charges, and no more.

[In order to avoid all uncertainty in respect to the duties, imposts, or charges whatsoever, which a vessel belonging to the citizens or subjects of one of the contracting parties ought to pay on arriving in the ports of the other, with a cargo consisting partly of articles the growth, produce, or manufacture of the country to which the vessel belongs, and partly of any other merchandize, which the said vessel is permitted to import by the preceding articles, it is agreed

a The Senate declined to give its advice and consent to the ratification of Articles III, IV, and VI, and the King of Sweden and Norway acceded.

that, in case a cargo should be thus mixed, the vessel shall always pay the duties, imposts, and charges according to the nature of that part of the cargo which is subjected to the highest duties, in the same manner as if the vessel imported this sort of merchandize only.]

ARTICLE V. The high contracting parties grant mutually the liberty of having, in the places of commerce and ports of the other, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, or Commercial Agents, who shall enjoy all the protection and assistance necessary for the due discharge of their functions. But it is here expressly declared that, in case of illegal or improper conduct in respect to the laws or government of the country to which they are sent, the said Consul, Vice-Consul, or Agent, may be either punished according to law, dismissed, or sent away, by the offended Government, that Government assigning to the other the reasons therefor. It is, nevertheless, understood, that the archives and documents relative to the affairs of the consulate shall be protected from all examinations, and shall be carefully preserved, being placed under the seal of the Consul and of the authority of the place where he shall have resided.

The Consuls and their deputies shall have the right, as such, to act as judges and arbitrators in the differences which may arise between the captains and crews of the vessels of the nation whose affairs are entrusted to their care. The respective Governments shall have no right to interfere in matters of this kind, except the conduct of the captain and crew shall disturb the peace and tranquility of the country in which the vessel may be, or that the Consul of the place shall feel himself obliged to resort to the interposition and support of the executive authority to cause his decision to be respected and maintained; it being, nevertheless, understood, that this kind of judgment, or award, shall not deprive the contending parties of the right which they shall have, on their return, to recur to the judicial authorities of their own country.

ARTICLE VI.

[In order to prevent all dispute and uncertainty in respect to what may be considered as being the growth, produce, or manufacture of the contracting parties respectively, it is agreed that whatever the chief or intendant of the customs shall have designated and specified as such, in the clearance delivered to the vessels which depart from the European ports of His Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway, shall be acknowledged and admitted as such in the United States; and that, in the same manner, whatever the chief or collector of the customs in the ports of the United States shall have designated and specified as the growth, produce, or manufacture of the United States, shall be acknowledged and admitted as such in the territories of His Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway:]

[The specification or designation given by the chief of the customs in the colonies of His Majesty the King of Sweden and Norway, and confirmed by the governor of the colony, shall be considered as

& The Senate declined to give its advice and consent to the ratification of Articles III, IV, and VI, and the King of Sweden and Norway acceded.

sufficient proof of the origin of the articles thus specified or designated to obtain for them admission into the ports of the United States accordingly.]

ARTICLE VII.

[ocr errors]

The citizens or subjects of one of the contracting parties, arriving with their vessels on any coast belonging to the other, but not willing to enter into port, or being entered into port, and not willing to unload or break bulk, shall have liberty to depart, and to pursue their voyage, without molestation, and without being obliged to render account of their cargo, or to pay any duties, imposts, or charges, whatsoever, on the vessels or cargo, excepting only the duties of pilotage, when a pilot shall have been employed, or those of quayage, or light money, whenever these dues are paid in the same circumstances by the citizens of subjects of the country.

It being, nevertheless, understood, that whenever the vessels belonging to the citizens or subjects of one of the contracting parties shall be within the jurisdiction of the other, they shall conform to the laws and regulations concerning navigation, and the places and ports into which it may be permitted to enter, which are in force with regard to the citizens or subjects of the country; and it shall be lawful for the officers of the customs in the district where the said vessels may be, to visit them, to remain on board, and to take such precautions as may be necessary to prevent all illicit commerce while such vessels remain within the said jurisdiction.

ARTICLE VIII. It is also agreed that the vessels of one of the contracting parties, entering the ports of the other, shall be permitted to discharge a part only of their cargoes, whenever the captain or owner shall desire so to do, and they shall be allowed to depart freely with the remainder, without paying any duties, imposts, or charges whatsoever, except on that part which shall have been landed, and which shall be marked and noted on the list or manifest containing the enumeration of the merchandise which the vessel ought to have on board, and which list ought always to be presented, without reservation, to the officers of the customs at the place where the vessel shall have arrived; and nothing shall be paid on the part of the cargo which the vessel takes away; and the said vessel may proceed therewith to any other port or ports in the same country, into which vessels of the most favoured nations are permitted to enter, and there dispose of the same; or the said vessel may depart therewith to the ports of any other country. It is, however, understood that the duties, imposts, or charges, which are payable on the vessel itself, ought to be paid at the first port where it breaks bulk and discharges a part of the

cargo, and that no such duties or impositions shall be again demanded in the ports of the same country where the said vessel may thereafter enter, except the inhabitants of the country be subjected to further duties in the same circumstances.

ARTICLE IX.

The citizens or subjects of one of the contracting parties shall enjoy in the ports of the other, as well for their vessels as for their mer

« ПретходнаНастави »