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Sa Majesté le Roi de Norvège:

Son Excellence M. Francis Hagerup, ancien président du conseil,

ancien professeur de droit, Son envoyé extraordinaire et ministre plénipotentiaire à la Haye et à Copenhague, membre de

la cour d'arbitrage.
Le Président de la République de Panama:

M. Belisario Porras.
Le Président de la République du Paraguay:

Son Excellence M. Eusebio Machaïn, envoyé extraordinaire et

ministre plénipotentiaire de la République à Paris; M. le comte G. Du Monceau de Bergendal, consul de la Républi

que à Bruxelles. Sa Majesté la Reine des Pays-Bas:

M. W. H. de Beaufort, Son ancien ministre des affaires étran

gères, membre de la seconde chambre des états-généraux; Son Excellence M. T. M. C. Asser, Son ministre d'état, membre

du conseil d'état, membre de la cour permanente d'arbitrage; Son Excellence le jonkheer J. C. C. den Beer Poortugael, lieu

tenant-général en retraite, ancien ministre de la guerre, mem

bre du conseil d'état; Son Excellence le jonkheer J. A. Röell, Son aide de camp en

service extraordinaire, vice-amiral en retraite, ancien ministre

de la marine; M. J. A. Loeff, Son ancien ministre de la justice, membre de la

seconde chambre des états-généraux. Le Président de la République du Pérou:

Son Excellence M. Carlos G. Candamo, envoyé extraordinaire et

ministre plénipotentiaire de la République à Paris et à Lon

dres, membre de la cour permanente d'arbitrage. Sa Majesté Impériale le Schah de Perse:

Son Excellence Samad Khan Momtazos Saltaneh, Son envoyé ex

traordinaire et ministre plénipotentiaire à Paris, membre de la

cour permanente d'arbitrage; Son Excellence Mirza Ahmed Khan Sadigh Ul Mulk, Son en

voyé extraordinaire et ministre plénipotentiaire à La Haye. Sa Majesté le Roi de Portugal et des Algarves, etc.:

Son Excellence M. le marquis de Soveral, Son conseiller d'état,

pair du Royaume, ancien ministre des affaires étrangères, Son
envoyé extraordinaire et ministre plénipotentiaire à Londres,

Son ambassadeur extraordinaire et plénipotentiaire;
Son Excellence M. le comte de Selir, Son envoyé extraordinaire

et ministre plénipotentiaire à La Haye;
Son Excellence M. Alberto d'Oliveira, Šon envoyé extraordinaire

et ministre plénipotentiaire à Berne. Sa Majesté le Roi de Roumanie:

Son Excellence M. Alexandre Beldiman, Son envoyé extraordi.

naire et ministre plénipotentiaire à Berlin; Son Excellence M. Edgar Mavrocordato, Son envoyé extraor

dinaire et ministre plénipotentiaire à La Haye. Sa Majesté l'Empereur de Toutes les Russies:

Son Excellence M. Nelidow, Son conseiller privé actuel, son am

bassadeur à Paris; Son Excellence M. de Martens, Son conseiller privé, membre per

manent du conseil du ministère Impérial des affaires étrangères, membre de la cour permanente d'arbitrage;

Sa Majesté l'Empereur de Toutes les Russies-Continued.

Son Excellence M. Tcharykow, Son conseiller d'état actuel, Son

chambellan, Son envoyé extraordinaire et ministre plénipoten

tiaire à La Haye. Le Président de la République du Salvador:

M. Pedro I. Matheu, chargé d'affaires de la République à Paris,

membre de la cour permanente d'arbitrage;
M. Santiago Perez Triana, chargé d'affaires de la République à

Londres.
Sa Majesté le Roi de Serbie:

Son Excellence M. Sava Grouïtch, général, président du conseil

d'état; Son Excellence M. Milovan Milovanovitch, Son envoyé extra

ordinaire et ministre plénipotentiaire à Rome, membre de la

cour permanente d'arbitrage; Son Excellence M. Michel Militchevitch, Son envoyé extraor

dinaire et ministre plénipotentiaire à Londres et à La Haye. Sa Majesté le Roi de Siam:

Mom Chatidej Udom, major-général;
M. C. Corragioni d'Orelli, Son conseiller de légation;

Luang Bhuvanarth Narübal, capitaine.
Sa Majesté le Roi de Suède, des Goths et des Vendes:

Son Excellence M. Knut Hjalmar Leonard Hammarskjöld, Son

ancien ministre de la justice, Son envoyé extraordinaire et ministre plénipotentiaire à Copenhague, membre de la cour permanente d'arbitrage; M. Johannes Hellner, Son ancien ministre sans portefeuille,

ancien membre de la cour suprême de Suède, membre de la

cour permanente d'arbitrage. Le Conseil Fédéral Suisse:

Son Excellence M. Gaston Carlin, envové extraordinaire et mi

nistre plénipotentiaire de la Confédération suisse à Londres

et à La Haye; M. Eugène Borel, colonel d'état major-général, professeur à l'uni

versité de Genève;

M. Max Huber, professeur de droit à l'université de Zürich. Sa Majesté l'Empereur des Ottomans:

Son Excellence Turkhan Pacha, Son ambassadeur extraordinaire,

ministre de l'evkaf;
Son Excellence Rechid Bey, Son ambassadeur à Rome;

Son Excellence Mehemmed Pacha, vice-amiral.
Le Président de la République Orientale de l'Uruguay:

Son Excellence M. José Battle y Ordoñez, ancien président de la

République, membre de la cour permanente d'arbitrage;
Son Excellence M. Juan P. Castro, ancien président du sénat,

envoyé extraordinaire et ministre plénipotentiaire de la

République à Paris, membre de la cour permanente d'arbitrage. Le Président des Etats-Unis de Vénézuéla :

M. José Gil Fortoul, chargé d'affaires de la République à Berlin. Who, after having deposited their full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed upon the following provisions :

ARTICLE I Belligerents are bound to respect the sovereign rights of neutral Powers and to abstain, in neutral territory or neutral waters, from

any act which would, if knowingly permitted by any Power, constitute a violation of neutrality.

ARTICLE II. Any act of hostility, including capture and the exercise of the right of search, committed by belligerent war-ships in the territorial waters of a neutral Power, constitutes a violation of neutrality and is strictly forbidden.

ARTICLE III. When a ship has been captured in the territorial waters of a neutral Power, this Power must employ, if the prize is still within its jurisdiction, the means at its disposal to release the prize with its officers and crew, and to intern the prize crew.

If the prize is not in the jurisdiction of the neutral Power, the captor Government, on the demand of that Power, must liberate the prize with its officers and crew.

ARTICLE IV. A Prize Court cannot be set up by a belligerent on neutral territory or on a vessel in neutral waters.

ARTICLE V. Belligerents are forbidden to use neutral ports and waters as a base of naval operations against their adversaries, and in particular to erect wireless telegraphy stations or any apparatus for the purpose of communicataing with the belligerent forces on land or sea.

ARTICLE VI. The supply, in any manner, directly or indirectly, by a neutral Power to a belligerent Power, of war-ships, ammunition, or war material of any kind whatever, is forbidden.

ARTICLE VII. A neutral Power is not bound to prevent the export or transit, for the use of either belligerent, of arms, ammunitions, or, in general, of anything which could be of use to an army or fleet.

ARTICLE VIII. A neutral Government is bound to employ the means at its disposal to prevent the fitting out or arming of any vessel within its jurisdiction which it has reason to believe is intended to cruise, or engage in hostile, operations, against a Power with which that Government is at peace. It is also bound to display the same vigilance to prevent the departure from its jurisdiction of any vessel intended to cruise, or engage in hostile operations, which had been adapted entirely or partly within the said jurisdiction for use in war.

ARTICLE IX. A neutral Power must apply impartially to the two belligerents the conditions, restrictions, or prohibitions made by it in regard to the admission into its ports, roadsteads, or territorial waters, of belligerent war-ships or of their prizes.

See Senate resolution of ratification, page 2366.

Nevertheless, a neutral Power may forbid a belligerent vessel which has failed to conform to the orders and regulations made by it, or which has violated neutrality, to enter its ports or roadsteads.

ARTICLE X.

The neutrality of a Power is not affected by the mere passage through its territorial waters of war-ships or prizes belonging to belligerents.

ARTICLE XI.

A neutral Power may allow belligerent war-ships to employ its licensed pilots.

ARTICLE XII.

In the absence of special provisions to the contrary in the legislation of a neutral Power, belligerent war-ships are not permitted to remain in the ports, roadsteads, or territorial waters of the said Power for more than twenty-four hours, except in the cases covered by the present Convention.

ARTICLE XIII.

If a Power which has been informed of the outbreak of hostilities learns that a belligerent war-ship is in one of its ports or roadsteads, or in its territorial waters, it must notify the said ship to depart within twenty-four hours or within the time prescribed by local regulations.

ARTICLE XIV.

A belligerent war-ship may not prolong its stay in a neutral port beyond the permissible time except on account of damage or stress of weather. It must depart as soon as the cause of the delay is at an end.

The regulations as to the question of the length of time which these vessels may remain in neutral ports, roadsteads, or waters, do not apply to war-ships devoted exclusively to religious, scientific, or philanthropic purposes.

ARTICLE XV.

In the absence of special provisions to the contrary in the legislation of a neutral Power, the maximum number of war-ships belong. ing to a belligerent which may be in one of the ports or roadsteads of that Power simultaneously shall be three.

ARTICLE XVI.

When war-ships belonging to both belligerents are present simultaneously in a neutral port or roadstead, a period of not less than twenty-four hours must elapse between the departure of the ship belonging to one belligerent and the departure of the ship belonging to the other.

The order of departure is determined by the order of arrival, unless the ship which arrived first is so circumstanced that an extension of its stay is permissible.

A belligerent war-ship may not leave a neutral port or roadstead until twenty-four hours after the departure of a merchantship flying the flag of its adversary.

ARTICLE XVII.

In neutral ports and roadsteads belligerent war-ships may only carry out such repairs as are absolutely necessary to render them seaworthy, and may not add in any manner whatsoever to their fighting force. The local authorities of the neutral Power shall decide what repairs are necessary, and these must be carried out with the least possible delay.

ARTICLE XVIII.

Belligerent war-ships may not make use of neutral ports, roadsteads, on territorial waters for replenishing or increasing their supplies of war material or their armament, or for completing their

crews.

ARTICLE XIX.

Belligerent war-ships may only revictual in neutral ports or roadsteads to bring up their supplies to the peace standard.

Similarly these vessels may only ship sufficient fuel to enable them to reach the nearest port in their own country. They may, on the other hand, fill up their bunkers built to carry fuel, when in neutral countries which have adopted this method of determining the amount of fuel to be supplied.

If, in accordance with the law of the neutral Power, the ships are not supplied with coal within twenty-four hours of their arrival, the permissible duration of their stay is extended by twenty-four hours.

ARTICLE XX.

Belligerent war-ships which have shipped fuel in a port belonging to a neutral Power may not within the succeeding three months replenish their supply in a port of the same Power.

ARTICLE XXI.

A prize may only be brought into a neutral port on account of unseaworthiness, stress of weather, or want of fuel or provisions.

It must leave as soon as the circumstances which justified its entry are at an end. If it does not, the neutral Power must order it to leave at once; should it fail to obey, the neutral Power must employ the means at its disposal to release it with its officers and crew and to intern the prize crew.

ARTICLE XXII.

A neutral Power must, similarly, release a prize brought into one of its ports under circumstances other than those referred to in Article XXI.

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