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CHAPLAINS AT THE UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY

The Mil (H. K. 6052) to fix the pay and allowances of chnplain at the United States Military Academy, was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

RESERVE SUPPLIES, WAR DEPARTMENT

The bill (H. K. 7752) to limit the issue of reserve supplies or equipment held by the War Department was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

PREPARATION' OF MILITARY MAPS

The bill (H. K. 7937) to authorize mapping agencies of the Government to assist in preparation of military maps was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

PURCHASE OF LAND AT SELFRIDOE FIELD, MICH.

The bill (U. R. 11808) to authorize an appropriation for the purchase of laud at Selfridge Field, Mich., was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

PURCHASE OF HEAL ESTATE IN HAWAII

The bill (H. K. 11809) to authorize an appropriation to complete the purchase of real estate in Hawaii was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

Mr. KING. Mr. President, I ask the chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs if we did not make a large appropriation, either last year or this year, for the purchase of necessary barracks and grounds for military purposes?

Mr. REED of Pennsylvania. Yes; Mr. President, we did. This amount is about .$34,000, appropriated to pay the verdict in condemnation proceedings started in 1917 for the condemnation of a tract that fitted into the land of Schofield Barracks. It has been occupied by the Government for more than 10 years, the condemnation proceedings were begun, and this is the final amount of the verdict rendered against the Government.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

BOARD OF VISITORS, UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY

The bill (H. I{. 8105) to provide for the membership of the Board of Visitors, United .States Military Academy, and for other purposes, was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill had been reported from the Committee on Military Affairs with an amendment, on page 1, line 5, after the word "Senate" and the comma, to add the words "two members of the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate."

The amendment was agreed to.

The bill was reported to the Senate as amended, and the amendment was concurred in.

The amendment was ordered to be engrossed and the bill to be read a third time.

The bill was read the third time and passed.
William; E, Connolly

The bill (H. R. 1537) for the relief of William R. Connolly was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed. Mary E. O'connor

The bill (H. R.6436) for the relief of Mary E. O'Connor was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed. Lois Wilson

The bill (H. R. 10192) for the relief of Lois Wilson was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

LOUIE JUNE

The bill (H. K. 2473) for the relief of Louie June was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill had been reported from the Committee on Claims with an amendment, on page 1, after line 10, to add a new section, as follows:

Skc. 2. That no part of the amount appropriated in this act in excess of 10 per cent thereof shall be paid or delivered to or received by any agent or agents, attorney or attorneys on account of services rendered or advances made In connection with said claim. Any person or persons

violating the provlHlons of this act shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction shall be fined in any sum not exceeding $1.000.

The amendment was agreed to.

The bill was reported to the Senate as amended, and the amendment was concurred in.

The amendment was ordered to be engrossed, and the bill to be read a third time.

The bill was read the third time, and passed.

GEORUE M. BROWDER AND F. N. BROWDER

The bill (H. K. 3372) for the relief of George M. Browder and F. N. Browder, was considered as in Committee of the Whole, and was read as follows:

Be it enacted, etc., That the Secretary of the Treasury Is authorized and directed to pay, out of any money in the Treasury iiot otherwise appropriated, to George M. Hrowder and F. N. Hrowder, as administrators of the estate of the late F. G. Browder, the sum of $7.500. Such, sum shall be In full satisfaction of all claims against the United States for damages resulting from the death of the said F. G. itrowder, who, on October 20, 1026, near the city of Montgomery, Ala., was struck and killed by an airplane owned and operated by the United States.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

CLIFFORD J. 8ANOHOVE

The bill (H. R. 3442) for the relief of Clifford J. Sanghove was considered as in Committee of the Whole, and was read, as follows:

Be it enacted, etc., That the Comptroller General of the United States Is authorized and directed to cancel the claim of the United States against Clifford J. Sanghove, lieutenant, United States Naval Keserve Force, retired, in the Bum of $1,067.46 erroneously paid to him.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

M. M. EDWARDS

The bill (H. R. 3936) for the relief of M. M. Edwards was considered as in Committee of the Whole, and was read, as follows:

Be it enacted, etc., That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he U hereby, authorized and directed to pay to M. M. I-Mwards, widow of Lieut. John Davis Edwards, chief engineer of the IT. 8. 8. Shaw, TInited States Navy, out of any money In the Treasury not otherwise approprinted, and In full settlement against the Government, the sum of $1,000 for the loss of her husband's household goods and personal effects which were destroyed in the disaster to the U. 8. S. Shaw, occurring on October 9, 1918, which destruction was due to collision with U. M. S. Aquttania.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

WILLIAM V. TYNES

The bill (H. R. 7061) for the relief of William V. Tynes, was considered as in Committee of the Whole, and was read, as follows:

Be it enacted, etc., That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he lg hereby, authorized and directed to pay, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated and in full settlement against the Government, the sum of $125 to William V. Tynes, in compensation for damages sustained by his Ford motor car as result of a collision with United States Navy trailer No. 42, In Norfolk, Va., on March 4, 1924.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

WILLIAM THURMAN ENOCH

The bill (H. R. 4993) for the relief of William Thurman Enoch was considered as in Committee of the Whole, and wus read, as follows:

Be it enacted, etc., That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to pay, out of any money In the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and in full settlement against the Government, to William Thurman Enoch, of El Paso, Tex., the sum of $5,000 on account of permanent injury sustained by him through the negligence of Frederick W. Warner, an employee of the United States.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

DYRON BBOWN BAL8TON

The bill (H. R. 5968) for the relief of Byron Brown Ralston, was considered as in Committee of the Whole and was read, as follows:

Be {( enacted, etc., That the President Is authorized to appoint Byron Brown Ralston, formerly lieutenant commander In the United States Navy, a lieutenant commander In the United States Navy and place him upon the retired list of the Navy with the retired pay and allowance of that grade with credit for any purposes for all service to which lie was entitled on April 15, 1027: Provided, That a duly constituted naval retiring board finds that the said Byron Brown Rnlston incurred physical disability incident to the service while on the active list of the Navy: Provided further, That no back pay, allowance, or emoluments shall become due as a result of the passage of this Act.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

HEIRS OF JOHN EIMEB

The bill (H. R. 1529) for the relief of the heirs of John Elmer, was considered as in Committee of the Whole, and was read as follows:

Re it enacted, etc., That the Secretary of the Treanury be, and he Is hereby, authorized aud directed to pay, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and in full and legal settlement against the Government, to the heirs of the late John Elmer the sum of $5.000 for death of said John Elmer, caused by being struck by a Government-owned automobile which was driven by a Government employee.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

HEIRS OF DR. THOMAS C. LONGING

The bill (H. H. 5398) for the relief of the heirs of the late Dr. Thomas C. Lougiuo was considered as in Committee of the Whole, and was read as follows:

Be it enacted, etc., That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and be Is hereby, authorized and directed to pay, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and in full settlement against the Government the sum of $1.000 to the heirs of the late Dr. Thomas C. Longino as reimbursement on account of losses of personal property as a result of the Ualveston flood, on September 8, 1900.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

THOMAS EDWIN HUFFMAN

The bill (H. R. 11741) for the relief of Thomas Edwin Huffman was considered as in Committee of the Whole, and was read, as follows:

Be it enacted, etc., That the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to redeem In favor of Thomas Edwin Huffman United States coupon notes Nos. D-12380683 to L-12380685, inclusive, in the denomination of $50 each, of the Victory Liberty loan 4% per cent convertible gold notes of 1922-23, matured May 20, 1923, with Interest at the rate of 4% per cent per annum from May 20, 1919, to May 20, 1923, inclusive, without presentation of said notes or the coupons representing interest from May 20, 1919, to May 20, 1923, the notes with the said coupons attached having been lost, stolen, or destroyed: Provided, That the said notes shall not have been previously presented and paid, and that payment shall not be made hereunder for any coupons that shall have been previously presented and paid: And provided further. That the said Thomas Edwin Huffman shall first file in the Treasury Department of the United States a bond in the penal sum of double the amount of the principal of the said notes and the Interest payable thereon when the notes matured, in such form and with such surety or sureties as may be acceptable to the Secretary of the Treasury, to indemnify and save harmless the United States from any loss on account of the lost, stolen, or destroyed notes hereinbefore described, or the coupons pertaining thereto.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

CHARLES R. WAREHAM

The bill (H. R. 8808) for the relief of Charles R. Wareham was considered as in Committee of the Whole, aud was read, as follows:

Be it enacted, etc., That the Postmaster General be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to credit the accounts of Charles II. Wareham, acting postmaster at Kearney, Nebr., in the sum of $17,204.83, due to the United States on account of funds and stamps lost in the burglary of the post office at Kearney, Nebr., on September 23, 1920.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

HOTTUM-KENNEDY DRY DOCK CO.

The bill (S. 613) for the relief of the Hottum-Kennedy Dry Dock Co., of Memphis, Tenn., was considered as in Committee of the Whole. The bill had been reported from the Committee

on Claims with an amendment, on page 1, line C, to strike out "$1,438.89" and insert in lieu thereof "$1,231.50," so as to make the bill read:

Be it enacted, etc.. That the Secretary of the Treasury Is authorized and directed to pay to the Hottum-Kennedy Dry Dock Co., owner of the Hottum-Kennedy Dry Docks, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, the sum of $1,231.50 In full settlement to reimburse such owner for loss sustained as a result of damages caused to such docks and appurtenant property through collision with the U. 8. S. Inspector on January 30, 1920.

The amendment was agreed to.

The bill was reported to the Senate as amended, ami the amendment was concurred in.

The bill was ordered to be engrossed for a third reading, read the third time, aud passed.

BILLS PASSED OVER

The bill (H. It. 1) to reduce and equalize taxation, provide revenue, and for oilier purposes was announced as next in order.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The bill will be passed over.

The bill (S. 35C9) to equalize the pay of certain classes of officers of the Regular Army was announced as next in order.

Mr. KING. Mr. President, I have had a number of letters making objection to the bill.

Mr. REED of Pennsylvania. I think it is perhaps another bill relating to something else about which the Senator has had letters. The Senator from Texas |Mr. Sheppard] is here. I would be glad to have him explain the bill.

Mr. SIIEPPARD. Mr. President, the bill merely gives to several hundred captains and majors in the Army the same promotion pay as is given all other officers in the same rank. They were omitted, it is presumed by oversight, when the bill was passed in 1920. These few hundred captains and majors are not receiving as much pay by $100 or $150 a month as all other officers of the same rank.

Mr. KING. I am unable to understand how that could have occurred.

Mr. SHEPPARD. It was an oversight. They were left out and were not mentioned in the Army pay bill when all the others were taken care of, or when the advanced pay was provided for. These officers were admitted in 1920 as emergency Army officers.

Mr. KING. Does it mean that there are a number of persons from civilian life who entered the Army and who are now in the Army, and that they want the same pay as regular West Point officers who have been in the Army for many years and perhaps have attained their number of years of service, when in the same grades there are emergency officers who reached those grades after a few months of service?

Mr. REED of Pennsylvania. No. The circumstances are these: The pay bill of 1922 provides that the pay period into which these officers shall be placed shall be determined by the length of their commissioned service plus an allowance of 14 years for officers of a particular age. It has been held by the Comptroller General that although that credit for commissioned service applies to the original pay hill in which they are placed, it does not help them In the subsequent Increment or subsequent pay period in which they would be entitled to be placed by further service. It gives them a constructive credit at the beginning of their service, but denies them the same constructive credit in the calculation of their pay periods from then on. It puts them in exact relation with those officers with whom they ranked at the beginning of their sen-ice.

It Is the result of a technicality that did not occur to anyone In Congress or in the department at the time the officers began their service. It will go very far toward relieving the discontent among the emergency officers who were taken in in 1920. It merely carries on the constructive credit for service that they were given at the beginning of their term.

Mr. KING. I want to ask the Senator from Pennsylvania if the War Department, after full consideration of the bill, has reported favorably or adversely? My understanding is it would cost a very large sum of mony—about half a million dollars, or perhaps more. That is not a primary objection or a sufficient objection if it is a proper bill.

Mr. REED of Pennsylvania. The War Department reports that the additional cost will be .$1,173.000 a year and reports against it. At the same time I do not want to say that without saying I believe it is fair and that I hope, if not to-night, at some time, it will be passed.

Mr. KING. I confess I do not understand the bill. I would like an opportunity to read the report and get the views of the War Department.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The bill will be passed over.

SALARIES OF PUBLIC PRINTER AND DEPUTY PUBLIC PRINTER

Mr. HARRISON. Mr. President, I understand that Calendar 737, the bill (H. R. 6669) fixing the salary of the Public Printer and of the Deputy Public Printer was passed in my absence. I had spoken to at least three Senators about objecting to it in my absence.

Mr. McKELIjAR. Mr. President, I think that was reconsidered a while ago.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Objection was made to its reconsideration.

Mr. HARRISON. I thought it would be objected to when it was called. I had understood from at least three Senators that they would object for me, but it was passed and some one objected to its reconsideration. I now ask unanimous consent that the vote by which it was passed be reconsidered and the bill take its place on the calendar.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the Senator from Mississippi?

Mr. BINGHAM. Mr. President, there was no objection when the bill was reached on the calendar.

Mr. HARRISON. That may be true. The Senator did not understand me. 1 had spoken to two or three Senators who were opposed to the bill, as I was opposed to the bill. I could not be here when the matter came up in the regular course, but I understood it would be objected to by the other Senators to whom I hud spoken. It was not objected to, and I therefore request that it be reconsidered. Is there objection to my unanimous-consent request?

Mr. BINGHAM. Will not the Senator let the request go over until to-morrow?

Mr. HARRISON. No. I want to get it acted on and the bill placed back on the calendar to-night.

Mr. BINGHAM. The Senator can submit ills request tomorrow.

Mr. HARRISON. I can state the reasons why I am opposed to the bill, but I do not want to take up the time of the Senate by doing that to-night, because it would prevent the passage of some other legislation. I may say to the Senator that if he objects to my request for reconsideration, there will be nothing else passed to-night.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. May the Chair interject the suggestion to the Senator from Mississippi that he make his motion to reconsider, which will prevent transmission of the bill to the House.

Mr. HARRISON. Do I understand the Chair objects to my unanimous-consent request?

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. No. The Chair was trying to offer some first aid to the injured. If the Senator enters his motion to reconsider he secures substantially the benefits which he attempts to secure by his unanimous-consent request.

Mr. HARRISON. I understand that, but I want the matter reconsidered and the bill placed on the calendar. I am not making an unreasonable request of the Senate. I object to very few bills here. I can object to more bills. I am opposed to this bill at this particular time. I want it to take its place on the calendar again. I ask unanimous consent that the votes by which it was ordered to a third reading and passed be reconsidered.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator from Mississippi asks unanimous consent that the votes by which the bill was ordered to a third reading and passed be reconsidered, and that the bill be restored to the calendar. Is there objection? The Chair hears none and it is so ordered. The bill is restored to its place on the calendar.

WARRANT OFFICERS OF THE REGULAR ARMY

The bill (S. 3459) to amend an act of Congress approved March 4, 1927 (Public, No. 795, 69th Cong.), to provide for appointment as warrant officers of the Regular Army of such persons as would have been eligible therefor but for the interruption of their status caused by military service rendered by them as commissioned officers during the World War, was announced as next in order.

Mr. KING. Over.

Mr. REED of Pennsylvania. Mr. President, will the Senator withhold his objection until I make a statement?

Mr. KING. Certainly.

Mr. REED of Pennsylvania. It has been held that these noncommissioned officers, who would be entitled to be appointed warrant officers, are prohibited from appointment if, as a matter of fact, their services as noncommissioned officers were interrupted during the World War by their temporary service as commissioned officers. In other words, they can not receive the appointment to which they would otherwise be entitled if they were more than ordinarily meritorious and were temporarily used as commissioned officers. The additional cost to the Gov

ernment will he very slight. It Is a long-deferred recognition of good service to very loyal noncommissioned officers. I hope the Senate will be willing to pass it.

Mr. KING. I observe the report of the Secretary of War states that the Director of the Budget has been consulted and advises that the proposed legislation is in conflict with the financial program of the President. There must be a considerable amount of expense attached to it or it would not meet with the disapproval of the President.

Mr. REED of Pennsylvania. The additional cost will be $6,387.20 a year. The recommendation of the War Department is that if the proposed legislation should be enacted into law it will correct an injustice done to a small class of men who served faithfully during the World War and are yet debarred from reaping the benefits to which they would have been eligible by reason of long and faithful service had they not accepted temporary commissions as officers. Then, having in every way argued in favor of the bill, the Secretary of War winds up with the curt statement that it is in conflict with the financial program of the President. It may be that it is, but it is certainly a long-deferred recognition due to a very faithful group of noncommissioned officers.

Mr. KING. There ought to be some harmony in the executive departments.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Does the Senator from Utnh withdraw his objection?

Mr. KING. I do.

There being no objection, the Senate, as in Committee of the Whole, proceeded to consider the bill, which had been reported from the Committee on Military Affairs with an amendment on page 1. line 5, to strike out the word "person" and insert the word "persons," so as to make the bill read:

Be it enacted, etc., That the Secretary of War he, and he hereby Is. authorized and directed to appoint ns warrant officers of the Regular Army any persona whose commissioned service in the Army during the World War, added to their service as quartermaster clerk, amounted to 12 years or more of service prior to June 4, 1920, and who were not eligible for appointment as field clerks, Quartermaster Corps, under the provisions of the act of August 29, 1SH6, because of the interruption of their 12 years' requisite service as quartermaster clerks to render commissioned service in the World War: Provided, That for the purposes of this net the period of commissioned service during the World War prior to June 4, 1020, be deemed equivalent to a like period of detached service away from permanent station or duty beyond the continental limits of the United States: Provided, That in determining length of service for longevity pay and retirement they shall be credited with and entitled to count the same military service as authorized for warrant officers, and all classified sen-ice rendered as clerks in the Military Establishment: Provided further, That the limitation In the act of June 30, 1922, on the number of warrant officers, United States Army, shall not apply to the appointees hereunder.

The amendment was agreed to.

The bill was reported to the Senate as amended, and the amendment was concurred in.

The bill was ordered to be engrossed for a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

EDGAR TRAVIS, 88.

The bill (S. 652) for the relief of Edgar Travis, sr., was considered as in Committee of the Whole. The bill had been reported from the Committee on Military Affairs with amendments on page 1, line 7, after the word "have" to insert the words "enlisted in said company on April 1, 1863, and to have," and in line 9, after the word "service," to insert the words " of the United States as a private," and in line 10, after the word "company" to insert the words "on December 26, 1864," so as to make the bill read:

Be it enacted, etc., That In the administration of any laws conferring rights, privileges, and benefits upon honorably discharged soldiers, Edgar Travis, sr., late of Company I, Sixth Uegiment West Virginia Volunteer Infantry, shall hereafter be held nnd considered to have enlisted in said company on April 1, 1803, and to have been honorably discharged from the military service of the United States as a private of said company on December 26, 1804: Provided, That no pay, pension, or allowance shall be held to have accrued prior to the passage of this act.

The amendments were agreed to.

The bill was reported to the Senate as amended, and the amendments were concurred in.

The bill was ordered to be engrossed for a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

BILL PASSED OVER

The bill (H. R. 8988) for the relief of Milton Longsdorf was announced as next in order.

Mr. FLETCHER. Mr. President, I desire to call the attention of the Senate to the fact that we have passed to-night a number of House claims bills, one after the other. I am not going to object to any of them, but my understanding Is, nnd I want to state this for the Information of all concerned, that there are over 100 bills which have passed the Senate Involving meritorious and just claims, hanging fire in the body at the other end of the Capitol, without even being reported out of committee. It Is almost time to serve notice on somebody that they can not expect us to pass their bills sent to us by the House and have them continue to refuse to act on bills which the Senate sends to them. I merely wanted to say that much.

Mr. KING. Let the bill go over.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The bill will be passed over.

The bill (H. R. 3241) for the relief of Seymour Buckley was announced as next in order.

Mr. KING. Let that go over.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The bill will be passed over.

BILL INDEFINITELY POSTPONED

The bill (S. 1690) for tho relief of Lewis W. Grain was announced as next in order. The bill had been reported adversely from the Committee on Military Affairs.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Without objection, the bill will be Indefinitely postponed.

ENSIGN JACOB E. DBGABMO

The bill (H. R. 9148) for the relief of Ensign Jacob E. DeGarmo, United States Nuvy, was considered as In Committee of the Whole, and was read, as follows:

Be U enacted, etc., That the President is hereby authorized to appoint, by and with the advice and consent of tbe Senate, Ensign Jacob E. DeGarmo, United States Navy, a lieutenant, Junior grade, on the retired list of the Navy: Provided, That nothing contained herein shall entitle Ensign Jncob E. DeGarmo to any back pay or allowance.

Mr. KING. Mr. President, I should like an explanation of the bill from the Senator from Maine.

Mr. HALE. Mr. President, the purpose of the bill is to advance Ensign DeGanno, United States Navy, one grade on the retired list of the Navy, thereby giving him retired rank, pay, and allowances that by genernl law should and would be his had the proper procedure and action been taken in his case.

The act of March 4, 1911, provides that if an officer of the Navy fails in his physical examination when eligible for promotion, and said physical disability shall be determined to have been contracted in the line of duty, such officer shall be retired with the rank to which his seniority entitled him to be promoted.

Ensign DeGarmo was eligible for promotion to the rank of lieutenant, junior grade, and was examined physically by a medical board to determine his physical fitness for pro'motlon to that rank. He became eligible in 1923. He was not found physically qualified for promotion. Eight months later he was ordered to appear before a naval retiring board, not before a medical examining board, to determine fitness for promotion, and as a result of the findings of the retiring board he was placed on the retired list with the rank of ensign, whereas he should have been ordered before a medical board to determine fitness for promotion, and, if found physically unqualified for promotion, he would have been placed upon the retired list with the rank of lieutenant, junior grade, to which his seniority entitled him.

The bill seeks to give him the rank of lieutenant, junior grade, on the retired list to which, by the act of March 4, 1911, he is entitled. Under the regular procedure he should have been retired as a lieutenant, junior grade. Instead of ensign, the rank in which he was retired. The department reported favorably on the bill.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

FRANK A. GBAB

The bill (H. R. 1951) granting six months' pay to Frank A. Grab was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill has been reported from the Committee on Naval Affairs with an amendment, on page 1, line 10, after the word "death," to insert: "Provided, That the said Frank A. Grab establishes that he was actually dependent upon his son, Alfred Newton Grab, at the time of the hitter's death," so as to make the bill read:

Be it enacted, etc., That the Secretary of the Navy be, and he Is hereby, authorized nnd directed to pay, out of current appropriations, I'ay of the Navy, 1927. to Frank A. Grab, father of Alfred Newton Grab, deceased seaman, United States Navy, who was killed In line of duty on February 7, 1922, at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, an amount equal to six

months' pay at the rate said Alfred Newton Grab was receiving at the date of blH death: Provided, That the said Frank A. Orab establishes that he wns actually dependent upon his son, Alfred Newton Grab, «t the time of the tatter's death.

The amendment was agreed to.

The bill was reported to the Senate as amended, and the amendment was concurred in.

The amendment was ordered to be engrossed, and the bill to be read a third time.

The bill was read the third time, and passed.

ALEXANDEB GINQRAS

The bill (H. R. 11978) granting six months' pay to Alexander Gingras, father of Louis W. Gingras, deceased private, United States Marine Corps, in active service, was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill had been rei>orted from the Committee on Naval Affairs with an amendment, on page 1, line 9, after the word "death," to insert: "Provided, That the said Alexander Gingrns establishes that he was actually dependent upon his son, Louis Walter Gingras, at the time of the latter's death"; so as to make the bill read:

Be it enacted, etc., That the Secretary of the Navy be, and he is hereby, authorized and directed to pay, out of current appropriations, Pay of the Navy, 1927, to Alexander Gingras, father of Louis W. Gingras, deceased private, United States Marine Corps, who died in line of duty on March 31, 1927, at Managua, Nicaragua, an amount equal to six months' pay at the rule said Louis W. Gingras was receiving at the date of bis death: Provided, That the said Alexander Gingras establishes that be wns actually dependent upon his son, Louis Walter Gingras, at the time of the latter's death.

The amendment was agreed to.

The bill was reported to the Senate as amended, and the amendment was concurred in.

The amendment was ordered to be engrossed, and the bill to be read a third time.

The bill was read the third time and passed.

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

The bill (S. 2440) to provide that four hours shall constitute a day's work on Saturdays throughout the year for all employees in the Government Printing Office was announced as next in order.

Mr. KING. Let that go over until we have a chance to discuss it.

Mr. SHIPSTEAD. Mr. President, will the Senator withhold that objection for a moment?

Mr. KING. Let me say to the Senator that he was kind enough to furnish me some data this afternoon which I have not had time to examine. I thought perhaps on Thursday evening we could take up the matter and discuss it.

Mr. SHIPSTEAD. Very well.

Mr. KING. It seems to me there is some relationship between these and other employees of the Government.

Mr. SHIPSTEAD. Yes. May I take just a moment to state the difference? The difference is this:

The employees of the Government Printing Office work 48 hours a week. The employees of the executive departments work 42 hours a week. The employees of the Government Printing Office do not get 30 days' sick leave, as all employees of all the other departments get. They do not get that 30 days' leave. This will give them a half holiday on Saturday. It will give them a 44-hour week, the same hours per week that are enjoyed by all men in the printing trades all over the United States.

I hoj>e the Senator will withdraw his objection. That is the only difference.

Mr. KING. Mr. President, on Thursday evening I shall be very glad to consider this bill. With the statement of the Senator, I am inclined to support it; but I should like to examine it.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator objects, and the bill will be passed over.

AMENDMENT OF TEACHERS' SALARY ACT

The bill (S. 40C3) to amend certain sections of the teachers' salary act, approved June 4, 1924, and for other purposes, was considered as in Committee of the Whole, and was read.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to be engrossed for a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

Mr. KING subsequently said: Mr. President, what became of Senate bill 4063?

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. It was passed.

Mr. KING. I had an amendment to offer to that bill, and \ do not have it here to-night. I ask unanimous consent to reconsider the vote by which the bill was passed.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The Senator from Utah asks unanimous consent to reconsider the vote whereby Senate bill 4063 was passed. Is there objection? The Chair hears none, and the bill will be returned to its place on the calendar.

CUSTOMs BUILDINGS IN PORTO RICO

Tha bill (H.R. 9363) to provide for the completion and repair of customs buildings in Porto Rico was considered as in Committee of the Whole. The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed. JAMES R. P. WELCH

The bill (H. R. 971) for the relief of James K. P. Welch was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill had been reported from the Committee on Military Affairs with an amendment, on page 1, line 7, after the word, “as,” to insert, “ of the date August 31, 1864, as,” so as to make the bill read:

Be it enacted, etc., That in the administration of the pension laws and the laws governing the National Home for Disabled Volunteers, or any branch thereof, James K. P. Welch shall hereafter be held and considered to have been honorably discharged from the military service of the United States as of the date August 31, 1864, as a private of Company I, Fifty-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Civil War: Provided, That no back pay, bounty, pension, or allowance shall be held to have accrued prior to the passage of this act.

The amendment was agreed to. The bill was reported to the Senate as amended, and the amendment was concurred in. The amendment was ordered to be engrossed, and the bill to be read a third time. The bill was read the third time, and passed.

M. SELLER & CO.

The bill (S. 2304) for the relief of M. Seller & Co. was considered as in Committee of the Whole, and was read, as follows:

Be it enacted, etc., That the Secretary of the Treasury is authorized and directed to refund to M. Seller & Co., Portland, Oreg., certain penalties in the amount of $7,147.80, being amount paid to the collectors of customs at Portland, Oreg., and Seattle, Wash., on April 28, 1927, in the respective sums of $4,749.40 and $2,398.40, said penalties being incurred under the customs laws in the entry of certain merchandise from Germany, at a less value than that returned upon final appraisement, such entry having been made without any intention to defraud the revenues of the United States or to conceal or misrepresent the facts of the case or to deceive the appraiser as to the value of the merchandise.

Mr. KING. Mr. President, I should like to have an explanation of that bill. Mr. STEIWER. Mr. President, the bill is my colleague's bill. I observe that he is absent for the moment from the Chamber. This bill is for the relief of a firm doing business at Portland, Oreg., and Seattle and Spokane, Wash. It provides for the refunding of certain penalties exacted by the Customs Service upon goods that were erroneously misvalued and entered. The department felt that they were obliged to collect the penalties. They have stated, however, in the statement made to the committee which examined the bill that they had no doubt but that the declaration of value was made in good faith. The committee believed in the light of 50 years of very lawabiding course of this firm in its dealings with the United States Government, in view of the fact that it had never encountered any penalty heretofore, that the statement of good faith upon the part of the department was a sufficient justification to allow the return of the penalties. I hope the Senator may not object to the bill. Mr. KING. I should like to ask the Senator what is the recommendation of the acting official of the Treasury Department under whose jurisdiction this claim would come. Mr. STEIWER. They made no recommendation, save to report that they had no doubt that the declaration of value was made in good faith. The reason why they made no recommendation was that they thought their recommendation might be construed as an attitude upon their part that would open up other claims; but I desire to suggest to the Senator that there probably will be no other claims where the circumstances are similar to this one. I neglected to state, in the statement I made a minute ago, that in this particular case this importer had appealed to the Treasury Department for information as to its course in making the valuation, and made the valuation under the information supplied by the Treasury Department itself, which was erroneous, as it proved afterwards because the antidumping law had just been enacted, and both the agent of the Treasury Depart

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*: and the importer were in error in their understanding of e law.

Mr. KING. Mr. President, may I say to the Senator that many complaints have come to the attention of some of us, and I know the matter was considered when an investigation of the Internal Revenue Bureau was under consideration, as to the frequency with which goods were undervalued that were brought into the United States; and many manufacturers in the United States, those whose products come into competition with imports into the United States, have complained of the undervaluations; and many charges have been made. I think truthfully, that many of these importations were fraudulently undervalued. It would seem to me that we ought to be very careful in remitting these penalties.

Mr. STEIWER. The committee, if I may say so to the Senator, scrutinized this claim with that particular idea in mind. We thought, in view of the statement made by the Treasury Department that it was done in good faith, on account of 50 years of honest dealings with the Treasury, that the claimants were entitled to the presumption of good faith in this particular case.

Mr. KING. I shall not object.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to be engrossed for a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

FINCh it. Arch Ert

The bill (H. R. 2658) for the relief of Finch R. Archer was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

John M. SAVERY

The bill (H. R. 4925) for the relief of John M. Savery was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

BILL PASSED OVER

The bill (H. R. 11951) to amend the act entitled “An act for the relief of contractors and subcontractors for the post offices and other buildings and work under the supervision of the Treasury Department, and for other purposes,” approved August 25, 1919, as amended by the acts of March 6, 1920, and February 27, 1926, was announced as next in order.

Mr. KING. Let that go over.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The bill will be passed over.

PAN AMERICAN UNION

The bill (H. R. 12899) authorizing the erection for the sole use of the Pan American Union of an office building on the square of land lying between Eighteenth Street, C Street, and Virginia Avenue NW., in the city of Washington, D. C., was considered as in Committee of the Whole. Mr. KING. Mr. President, may I inquire what is the cost to the Government, if any? I thought we had a Pan American Union. Is this to authorize the construction of another building? Mr. KEYES. Yes, Mr. President; this is to authorize the construction of an office building. The present building is not adequate for the activities of the Pan American Union at the present time. It is proposed to erect an office building across the street from the present Pan American Union Building, on a site now owned by the Government, and now occupied by the War Department. There is no expense at all to the Government, except that the Government will loan this site, but will retain the title to the land. Mr. KING. Who will pay for the building? Mr. KEYES. The Pan American Union. Mr. FLETCHER. Have they not got ground enough where they are to construct their office building? Mr. KEYES. There is room around the building, but architects are of the opinion that it would spoil the building that is there now to undertake to put an office building on the same lot. Mr. FLETCHER. I thought possibly there was room back of that building. Mr. KEYES. This would be back, of course, but it would be across the street. There is no objection to it, so far as I know ; and the War Department, which occupies the proposed site, is perfectly agreeable to the use of the land for this purpose. The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS

Mr. BRUCE. Mr. President, if there is no objection, I should like to have inserted in the REcoRD an address by Rev.

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