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George E. Bevans, of Fairmount, W. Va., which I think is of some value.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Without objection, It will be so ordered.

The matter referred to is here printed, as follows:

EEVANS REVIEWS LKAODB OF NATIONS tS ACTION MINISTER WHITES

ABOUT ORGANIZATION IN "UiAGUE Or NATIONS PRACTICAL"

"The League of Nations practical" Is the subject discussed this week by the Rev. George E. Bevans, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, at Fairmount, W. Va. Doctor Bevans spent n week at Geneva Inst summer studying the League of Nations and attending the fourth annual Institute of International Relations arranged by the League of Nations Union (London) and the League of Nations Nonpartisan Association (New York). About 400 delegates were present from Great Britain and the United States.

In discussing the " League of Nations practical," Doctor Bevans says:

"Fifty-five years ago there was no association of nations to see that letters were safely and quickly delivered from one country to another. Mail traveled very slowly and on account of the difference in rates of postage it was difficult to send letters Into foreign countries. In 1874 representatives from many nations met In Berne, Switzerland, and formed what was known as the Universal Postal Union. As a result of that union mail service was perfected between all nations and speed and safety of mail delivery was guaranteed by the governments of the world.

"Nine years ago there was no League of Nations established to help maintain peace and the most terrible war in all history had just come to a close. It was In January, 1920, that the first meetIng of the League of Nations was called by President Woodrow Wilson in Paris to promote international good will and peace. But as early as 1914 definite plans hnd been formulating in the minds of leading statesmen in Great Britain, France, and America, to the end that after the World War wuys and means must be provided to prevent another such holocaust of civilization. Hence, when the delegates to the Peace Conference met in Paris In 1919 there was a general understanding that some agreement would be made by the nations to prevent if possible future wars. Such an understanding was contained in the last of President Wilson's famous fourteen points, on the basis of which the allied nations signed the armistice with Germany, which stipulated that 'a general association of nations must be formed under specific covenants for the purpose of affording mutual guarantees of political Independence and territorial Integrity to great and small states alike.'

"The framing of the League of Nations covenant was the first work accomplished by the delegates at the Peace Conference In 1919. The introduction to this peace covenant reads as follows: 'The high contracting parties in order to promote international cooperation and security by the acceptance of obligations not to resort to war, by the prescription of open, Just, and honorable relations between nations, by the firm establishment of the understandings of international law as the actual rule of conduct among governments, and by the maintenance of Justice and a scrupulous respect for all treaty obligations In the dealings of organized peoples with one another, agree to this covenant of the League of Nations.'

"Such was the origin of the League of Nations, the story of its organization and accomplishments represents the dawning of a new day In world history. First, let us note the mechanics of the league and then appraise its success and failures. The league consists of an assembly, a council, and a secretariat. The assembly is composed of the rank and file of the nations of the earth. The underlying motive back of the league Is that eventually every government will become a member. Such membership Is not automatically accorded, however, but only as ea~ch nation, other than those nations which were charter members, makes definite application and agrees to certain requirements and guarantees and is favorably voted upon by two-thirds of the assembly.

"There were 28 of the allied and 13 neutral nations who were the first members of the leagues. One state, China, though It never signed the treaty of Versailles, containing the peace covenant, did sign the covenant and entered the league that way. Hence at the first meeting of the assembly of nations In 1920 there were 42 members represented. The assembly meets once a year on the first Monday In September. At the end of the seventh assembly In 1927 the membership of the league had increased to 60 nations. The most notable countries not in the league are the United States, Russia, Mexico, Turkey, and Egypt. All governments In the world with the exception of eight have been members of the league.

"It was quite fitting that the home of this new international organization should be centered at Geneva, Switzerland, the country which has not had a war in a hundred years and whose republican form of government is the oldest in existence. The assembly building nt Geneva Is a very plain-looking rectangular structure, much like a public hall In America, with n seating capacity of possibly 1,200. In the assembly each nation can have three representatives, nominated In most cases by the prime ministers of each country, and as all public questions are

referred to committees and each nation has a member on each committee it Is customary for the different States to have a group at experts to assist in the committee work. The unanimous vote of the assembly is required for any definite action.

"The work of the assembly consists In discussing six classes of questions, as follows: 1. Legal and constitutional questions. 2. The league's technical organizations (the economic, health, and transit commissions). 3. Disarmament. 4. The league's budget. 5. Humanitarian questions. 6. Political questions (Including mandates.1. The assembly Is independent of the council and corresponds roughly to a house of representatives. Its meetings are always of the open-forum type, where the freest public discussions are held. The assembly turns the white light of publicity upon all international questions and serves as a safety valve for the nations.

"The council Is limited in numbers and corresponds to a cabinet In a government. It gives prominence and recognized leadership to the largest nations. In the council, Great Britain. France, Italy, Japan, and Germany have permanent seats, and nine other members are elected by the assembly, the method being to elect three members each year for a period of three years. The council Is somewhat like the Senate of the United States with its restricted membership. It meets at least four times a year, In March, June, September, and December, and almost always at Geneva in the famous glass room. In fact, the council has had 44 meetings in the seven years of its history and has developed a new method of handling problems of foreign affairs. The prime ministers, secretaries of foreign relations, and other leading statesmen thus are brought together frequently to talk informally about matters of international concern. English and French are the two official languages used at the league.

"The secretariat la chosen from 30 nations. It Is something distinctively new in international cooperation and is the outstanding feature of the League of Nations. It has beon called the international civil service and well deserves the confidence and praise which it has received from everyone acquainted with its work. There are from five to six hundred international employees in the secretariat and labor department of the league. They are all experts, skilled in the special line of work for which they have been selected. They keep their nationality, but their official allegiance and responsibility are to the league alone. They remain at Geneva all the year engaged in their technical work relating to the mandate countries, public health, social and labor problems, press publicity, legal matters, armaments, etc. Rarely do two members of the same nationality work together, the result being a new and valuable coordination of different racial points of view, produce better international understanding and better international relations. Men and women are equally eligible for this world work through the secretariat. The secretary general is elected annually by the league.

"The expense attachd to such International administration and service is by no means small and yet anyone who makes a study of the League of Nations would not begrudge the expenditures. The cost of the league, including the International Labor Organization and the Permanent Court of International Justice, amounts to $4.500.000 annually, which sum represents the cost of two hours of World War to the United States or one throe-thousandths of the annual budget of France.

"The accomplishments of the league in the brief seven years of Its history can be summed up as follows: First, the settlement of political disputes, such as the Vllna question, which had started a war between Poland and Lithuania In September. 1020. but. through the intervention of the League of Nations, fighting was ended. Second, the Aaland Islands question represented n struggle between Sweden and Finland for possession of the Islands. The league appointed two impartial commissions of Jurists of different nationalities, who visited the islands and countries Involved and whose recommendations brought about satisfactory settlement of the difficulties. Third, the Upper Silesia question presented a problem of the division of that territory between Germany and Poland which would be acceptable to the two nations. The league by wise and tactful planning succeeded in making the new frontier 'a line of union rather than of division.' Fourth, the Yugoslav threat of Albania was the occasion of the Invasion of Albanian territory by Yugoslav troops. The matter was brought l>efore the council, the Albanian and Yugoslav representatives being present. Pledges were given to respect the frontier and the trouble died down. Fifth, the Memel dispute illustrates another type of league methods. The port of Memel on the Baltic was the prize sought both by Lithuania and Poland. A small commission of experts, with Mr. Norman Davis, a former Acting Secretary of State in the United States, as chairman, studied the dispute and submitted an agreement which settled the points at issue. Sixth, the Greco-Hulgarian dispute which started in October, 1923, an open warfare between (be two countries, with Greek troops invading Bulgaria with artillery and airplanes and bombing towns and bridges. Bulgaria appealed to the league, fighting was stopped, and Greece had to pay over $200,000 damages to Bulgaria.

"Other examples of disputes settled by the league could b« mentioned. Again and again embryonic wars have been prevented by the intervention of the league, which without such an international agency might have resulted in another continental or world war. In addition to settling political disputes, the League of Nations has accomplished an enormous amount of reconstruction work. International loans were arranged which saved Austria and Hungary from bankruptcy. One mil lion four hundred thousand Greek refugees were kept from perishing and established In Greece by a loan of $50,000,000. Four hundred and twenty-seven thousand prisoners of war were exchanged and aided by the League of Nations. Various health centers have been established by the league. The white-slave traffic in women and children has been closely watched nnd studied. Obscene literature curtailed and two antiopium conferences fostered.

"In conclusion, the successes in International relations through conferences and by throwing delays into the war machinery have demonstrated that the League of Nations has developed a new technique, which, if perfected, will produce n new world order. The failures of tlie league are due to old national intrigues and racial Jealousies. It is hard for old hatreds to die. Treaties will always be potential scraps of paper until the sense of moral obligation Is universally developed.

"The League of Nations In the seven years of Ha history has dealt with minor political differences rather than major difficulties, though no dispute is so trifling that it can not become larger. As Hon. Eliliu Koot said, 'The spirit of international disputes Is the main thing,' and it Ib the creation of that spirit which cooperation and Interchange of thought and discussion between the nations of the earth at Geneva Is accomplishing.

"The day can not be far distant when the United States, with the other Indifferent countries, will pledge allegiance to a united states of the world, a league of nations which shall in truth become an open parliament of man. When the day dawns, 'the sword shall be beat into plowshares and the spears into pruning hooks, nations shall not lift the sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more.' God hasten that day!"

ESTABLISHMENT OP ADDITIONAL LAND OFFICES

Mr. STEIWER submitted an amendment intended to be proposed by him to the bill (S. 1794) establishing additional land offices in the States of Montana, Oregon, Idaho, and South Dakota, which was ordered to lie on the table and to be printed.

PNEUMATIC-TUBE SEKVICE

The bill (H. R. 13171) authorizing the Secretary of the Treasury to accept a franchise from the government of the city of New York to change the routing of the pneumatic-tube service between the customhouse and the present appraisers' stores building, and for other purposes, was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

BRIDGE BILLS

Mr. CURTIS. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent to pass seven bridge bills that have been reported without amendment. They are in the usual form.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. Is there objection? The Chair hears none.

The Senate, as in Committee of the Whole, proceeded to consider the following bridge bills in their order, and they were severally reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed:

H. R. 11692. An act authorizing the Gulf Coast Properties (Inc.), a Florida corporation, of Jacksonville, Duval County, Fla., its successors and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across the Lake Champlaiu at or near East Alburg, Vt.;

H. R. 11797. An act granting the consent of Congress to Columbus County, State of North Carolina, to construct, maintain, anil operate a free highway bridge across the Waccamaw River nt or near Reeves Ferry, Columbus County, N. C.; and

H. R. 11992. An act granting the consent of Congress to the Arkansas Highway Commission to construct, maintain, and oi»rate a free highway bridge across the Current River at or near Biggers, Ark.

LAKE SABTNE BRIDGE, TEX.

The bill (S. 4233) authorizing H. L. McKee, his heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across Lake Sabine at or near Port Arthur, Tex., was considered as in Committee of the Whole, as follows:

Be it enacted, etc., That, In order to promote Interstate commerce, Improve the postal service, and provide for military and other purposes, H. L. McKee, his heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, be, and Is hereby, authorized to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge and approaches thereto, across Lake Sabine, at a point suitable to the Interests ot navigation, between a point at or near Port Arthur, Tex., and a point opposite In Cameron Parish, La., In accordance with the provisions of the act entitled "An act to regulate the construction of

bridges over navigable waters," approved March 23, 1906, and subject to the conditions and limitations contained In this act.

Sbc. 2. There is hereby conferred upon H. L. McKee, his heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, all such rights and powers to enter upon lands and to acquire, condemn, occupy, possess, and use real estate and other property needed for the location, construction, operation, and maintenance of such bridge and Its approaches as are possessed by railroad corporations for railroad purposes or by bridge corporations for bridge purposes in the State in which such real estate or other property is situated, upon making just compensation therefor, to be ascertained and paid according to the laws of such State, and the proceedings therefor shall be the same as in the condemnation or expropriation of property for public purposes in such State: Provided, That no part of the present Pleasure Pier on the east side of the SabineNeches Canal belonging to the city of Port Arthur and/or leased to the Port Arthur Chamber of Commerce and Shipping shall be condemned, nor shall the same be acquired or occupied by the said H. L. McKee, his heirs, legal representatives, or assigns, except upon terms and conditions to be stipulated by said city of Port Arthur and the Port Arthur Chamber of Commerce and Shipping.

8»C. 3. The said H. L. McKee, his heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, is hereby authorized to fix and charge tolls for transit over such bridge, and the rates of toll so fixed shall be the legal rates until changed by the Secretary of War under the authority contained in the act of March 23, 1900.

Sec. 4. After the completion of such bridge, as determined by the Secretary of War, either the State of Texas, the State of Louisiana, any public agency or political subdivision of either of such States, within or adjoining which any part of such bridge is located, or any two or more of them jointly, may at any time acquire and take over all right, title, and Interest in such bridge and its approaches, and any interest in real property necessary therefor, by purchase or by condemnation or expropriation. In accordance with the laws of either of such States governing the acquisition of private property for public purposes by condemnation or expropriation. If at any time after the expiration of 10 years after the completion of such bridge, the same is acquired by condemnation or expropriation, the amount of damages or compensation to be allowed shall not include good will, going value, or prospective revenues or profits, but shall be limited to the sum of (1) the actual cost of constructing such bridge and Its approaches, less a reasonable deduction for actual depreciation in value; (2) the actual Cob! of acquiring such interests in real property; (3) actual financing and promotion costs, not to exceed 10 per cent of the sum of the cost of constructing tie bridge and its approaches and acquiring such interests In real property; and (4) actual expenditures for necessary improvements.

Sec. 5. If such bridge nnd its approaches shall at any time be taken over or acquired by the States or public agencies or political subdivisions thereof, or by either of them, as provided in section 4 of this act, and if tolls are thereafter charged for the use thereof, the rates of toll shall be so adjusted as to provide a fund sufficient to pay for the reasonable cost of maintaining, repairing, and operating the bridge and its approaches under economical management, and to provide a sinking fund sufficient to amortize the amount paid therefor, Including reasonable interest and financing cost, as soon as possible under reasonable charges, but within a period of not to exceed 15 years from the date of acquiring the same. After a sinking fund sufficient for such amortization shall have been so provided, such bridge shall thereafter be maintained and operated free of tolls, or rates of toll shall thereafter be so adjusted as to provide a fund of not to exceed the amount necessary for the proper maintenance, repair, and operation of the bridge and its approaches under economical management. An accurate record of the amount paid for acquiring the bridge and its approaches, the actual expenditures for maintaining, repairing, and operating the same and of the daily tolls collected, shall be kept and shall be available for the information of all persons interested.

Sec. 6. The said H. L. McKee, his heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, shall within 90 days after the completion of such bridge, file with the Secretary of War and with the highway departments of the States of Texas and Louisiana, a sworn Itemized statement showing the actual original cost of constructing the bridge and its approaches, the actual cost of acquiring any interest In real property necessary therefor, and the actual financing and promotion costs. The Secretary of War may, and upon request of the highway department of either of such States shall, at any time within three years after the completion of such bridge, investigate such costs and determine the accuracy and the reasonableness of the costs alleged In the statement of cost so filed, and shall make a finding of the actual and reasonable costs of constructing, financing, and promoting such bridge; for the purpose of such Investigation the said H. L. McKee, his heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, shall make available all of his records in connection with the construction, financing, and promotion thereof. The findings of the Secretary of War as to the reasonable costs of the construction, financing, and promotion of the bridge shall bo conelusive for the purposes mentioned In section 4 of this net, subject only to review iu a court of equity for fraud or gross mistake.

Sue. 7. The right to sell, assign, transfer, and mortgage all the rights, powers, anil privileges conferred by this act is hereby granted to 1C. Ll McKee, his heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, and any corporation to which or any person to whom such rights, powers, and privileges may be sold, assigned, or transferred, or who shall acquire the same by mortgage foreclosure or otherwise. Is hereby authorized and empowered to exercise the same as fully as though conferred herein directly upon such corporation or person.

Sep. 8. There Is hereby granted to H. L. McKee, his heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, a right of way not to exceed 100 feet in width across the spoil bank of the ship canal at such location, to be approved by the Chief of Engineers, as will provide a highway connection or connections between the bridge authorized by this act and any bridge or bridges that are or may hereafter he constructed across the ship canal, the United States to retain such free use of the right of way as does not interfere with the bridge approach: I'rorided. That no toll shall be charged for use of the approach to be built on United States property. The duration of such right of way shall terminate with the termination of the franchise granted by this act for the construction of the bridge and shall attach to nnd become a part of such bridge, and shall pass with the same in any transfer thereof.

Sec. 9. The right to niter, amend, or repeal this net Is hereby expressly reserved.

The bill was reported to the Semite without amendment, ordered to be engrossed for a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

8ABINE RTVEB BRIDUE

The bill (S. 4254) authorizing the State of Texas and the State of Louisiana to construct, maintain, and operate a free highway bridge across the Sabine River at or near Pendleton's Ferry, was considered as in Committee of the Whole, as follows:

Be H enacted, etc., That In order to facilitate Interstate commerce, Improve the Postal Service, nnd provide for military and other purposes, the State highway commission of Texas and the Louisiana Highway Commission be, nnd are hereby, authorized to construct, maintain, and operate a free highway bridge and approaches thereto across the Sablne River, between Sahine County. Tex., and Snblne Parish, La., at a point suitable to the interests of navigation, at or near Pendleton's Ferry, in accordance with the provisions of an act entitled "An act to regulate the construction of bridges over navigable waters," approved March 23, 1906.

Sic. 2. There Is hereby conferred upon the State highway commission of Texas and the Louisiana Highway Commission all such rights nnd powers to enter upon lands and to acquire, condemn, occupy, possess, and use real estate and other property, needed for tlie location, construction, operation, and maintenance of such bridge and its approaches aa are possessed by railroad corporations for railroad purposes or by bridge corporations for bridge purposes In the State In which such real estate or other property Is situated, upon making just compensation therefor, to be ascertained and paid according to the laws of such State, and the proceedings therefor shall be the same as iu the condemnation or expropriation of property for public purposes in such State.

Skc. 3. The right to alter, amend, or repeal this act is hereby expressly reserved.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to be engrossed for a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

MISSOURI RIVER BRIDGE NEAR RANDOLPH, MO.

The bill (H. K. 11338) authorizing the Kansas City Southern Railway Co., its successors and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across the Missouri River at or near Randolph. Mo., was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

The title was amended so as to read: "An act authorizing the Kansas City Southern Railway Co., its successors and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across the Missouri River near Randolph, Mo."

MISSOURI RIVBB BRIDGE

The bill (S. 4203) authorizing J. H. Haley, his successors and assigns (or his heirs, legal representatives, nnd assigns), to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across the Missouri River at or near a point where Olive Street. Road, St. Louis County, Mo., if extended west would intersect the Missouri River, was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

The ainendinenlM of the Committee on Commerce were, on page I, line 5, after the name "J. II. Haley," to strike out "his successors and assigns (or " ; in line 6, after the word "assigns," to strike out the parenthesis; on page 4, line 8, after the name "J. II. Haley," to strike out "his successors and assigns (or"; on (lie same page, line », after Ihe word "assigns," to strike

out the parenthesis; on the same page, line 24. after the name "J. H. Haley," to strike out "his successors nnd assigns or"; on page 5, line 1, after the word "assigns," to strike out the parenthesis; on the same iwge, line 10, aft It the name "J. H. Haley," to strike out "his successors and assigns (or"; and in line 11. afjer the word "assigns," to strike out the imrenthesis, so as to make the bill read:

lie it rnactnl, etc., That In order to promote Interstate commerce. Improve the Postal Service, and provide for military and other purposes, ,T. II. Haley, his heirs, legal representatives, nnd assigns, be, and Is hereby, authorized to construct, matntnin, and operate a bridge and approaches thereto across the Missouri River, at a point suitable to the interests of navigation, at or near a point about 3.500 feet downstream from mile 45 as established by the survey of the United States Engineers, War Department, said place or point being approximately 5.000 feet downstream from the point where Olive Street Road. St. Louis County, Mo., if extended west would Intersect the southerly bank of the Missouri River, in accordance with the provisions of the act entitled "An act to regulate the construction of bridges, over navigable waters." approved March 28, 1906, and subject to the conditions and limitations contained in this act.

Sec. L'. After the completion of such bridge, as determined by the. Secretary of War. either the State of Missouri, any political subdivision thereof within or adjoining which any part of sueli bridge is located, or any two or more of them jointly, may at any time acquire and take over all right, title, and interest in such bridge and Its approaches, and any Interest in real property necessary therefor, by purchase or by condemnation or expropriation. In accordance with the laws of such State governing tbe acquisition of private property for public purposes by condemnation or expropriation. If at any time afler tbe expiration of 10 years after the completion of such bridge the same is acquired by condemnation or expropriation, the amount of damages or compensation to be allowed shall not include good will, going value, or prospective revenues or protits. but shall lie limited to the sum of (1) the actual cost of constructing such bridge nnd its approaches, less a reasonable deduction for actual depreciation in value; (!') the actual cost of acquiring such Interest in real property; (3) actual financing and promotion cost, not to exceed 10 per cent of the sum of the cost of constructing the bridge and its approaches and acquiring such interest in real property; and (4) actual expenditures for necessary improvements.

S»c. 3. If such bridge shall at any time be taken over or acquired by the State of Missouri, or by any municipality or other political subdivision or public agency thereof, under the provisions of section 2 of this act. and If tolls are thereafter charged for the use thereof, the rates of toll shall be so adjusted as to provide a fund suOicieut to pay for the reasonable cost of maintaining, repairing, and operating the bridge and its approaches under economical management and to provide a sinking fund sufficient to amortize the amount paid therefor. Including reasonable interest and financial cost, as soon as possible under reasonable charges, but within a period of not to exceed lo years from tile date of acquiring the same. After a sinking fund sufficient for such amortization shall have been so provided, such bridge shall thereafter be maintained and operated free of tolls, or the rates of toil shall thereafter be so adjusted as to provide a fund of not to exceed the amount neci-ssary for the proper maintenance, repair, and operation of the bridge and its approaches under economical management. An accurate record of the amount paid for acquiring tbe bridge and its approaches, the actual expenditures for maintaining, repairing, and operating the same, nnd of tbe daily tolls collected shall be kept and shall be available for the information of all persons Interested.

S«C. 4. J. II. Haley, his heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, shall within 90 days after tbe completion of such bridge file with the Secretary of War and with the highway department of the State of Missouri a sworn itemized statement showing the actunl original cost of constructing the bridge and its approaches, the actual cost of acquiring any interest In real property necessary therefor, and the actual financing and promotion costs. The Secretary of War may, nnd at the request of the highway department of the Slate of Missouri shall, at any time within three years after the completion of such bridge, investigate such costs and determine the accuracy nnd the reasonableness of tbe costs alleged in the statement of costs so filed, nnd shnll make a finding of the nctunl and reasonable costs of constructing, financing, and promoting such bridge; for the purpose of such investigation the said J. H. Haley, his heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, shall make available all of its records in connection with the construction, financing, and promotion thereof. The findings of the Secretary of War as to tbe reasonable costs of the construction, financing, and promotion of the bridge shall be conclusive for the purposes mentioned In section 2 of this act, subject only to review in a court of equity for fraud or gross mistake.

Sbc. 5. The right to sell, assign, transfer, and mortgage all the rights, powers, and privileges conferred by this act is hereby granted to J. II. Haley, his heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, and any corporation to which or any person to whom such rights, powers, and prlvlleges may be sold, assigned, or transferred, or who shall acquire tic game by mortgage foreclosure or otherwise, Is hereby authorized and empowered to exercise the same as fully as though conferred herein directly upon such corporation or person.

Sec. 6. The right to alter, amend, or repeal this act is hereby expressly reserved.

The amendments were agreed to.

The bill was reported to the Senate as amended, and the amendments were concurred in.

The bill was ordered to be engrossed for a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

The titJe was amended so as to read: "A bill authorizing J. H. Haley, his heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across the Missouri River near a point where Olive Street Jtoad, St. Louis County, Mo., if extended west would intersect the Missouri River."

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE FOR REVISION OP CONVENTION OF 1914 FOR SAFETY OP LIFE AT SEA

The joint resolution (S. J. Res. 131) providing for the participation by the United States in the International Conference for the Revision of the Convention of 1914 for the safety of life at sea was considered as in Committee of the Whole, and was read.

Mr. KING. Mr. President, I have no objection to the consideration of this joint resolution, but I inquire why the appropriation is $100,000. In most of these measures it is either $25,000 or $50,000.

Mr. REED of Pennsylvania. Because it will be necessary for the United States to send a delegation of not less than 11 persons to London for this purpose, with about 11 experts accompanying them. That was the size of the delegation in 1914. The United States has more tonnage and is more interested in this convention than any other nation, and It is necessary for her to be represented at all of the various subcommittee meetings that are held by the conference.

Mr. JONES. Mr. President, I desire an opportunity to look into this joint resolution. I ask that it go over to-night.

The PRESIDENT pro tempore. The joint resolution will be passed over.

INDEMNITY TO GOVEBNMENT OF FRANCE

The bill (H. R. 9043) to authorize the .payment of an indemnity to the Government of France on account of losses sustained by the owners of the French steamship Madeleine as a result of a collision between it and the U. S. S. Kerwood, was considered as in Committee of the Whole.

Mr. KING. Mr. President, I observe that the tort in this case, if there was one, was committed by the United States, so I have no objection.

Mr. REED of Pennsylvania. It was a collision with an American transport.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

RECESS

Mr. CURTIS. Mr. President, the hour of 10.30 o'clock having arrived, I move that the Senate take a recess until 12 o'clock noon to-morrow.

The motion was agreed to; and (at 10 o'clock and 30 minutes p. m.) the Senate took a recess until to-morrow, Wednesday, May 9, 1928, at 12 o'clock meridian.

NOMINATIONS

Executive nomination* received by the Senate May 8 (legislative day of May 3), 1928

Foreign Service

To oe Foreign Service officers, unclassified
Carlos J. Warner, of Ohio.
Burton Y. Berry, of Indiana.
John S. Littell. of New York.
William P. Cochran. jr., of Pennsylvania.
Robert I). Coe, of Wyoming.
Stanley G. Slavens, of Texas.
Archibald E. Gray, of Pennsylvania,
Arthur R. Ringwalt, of Nebraska.
Morris N. Hughes, of Illinois.
Bertel E. Kuniholm, of Massachusetts.
Edmund O. Clubb, of Minnesota.
Henry S. Villard. of New York.
William Edwin Guy, of Missouri.
Frederick II. Ward, of New Jersey.
William W. Buttenvorth, jr., of Louisiana.
Julius Wadsworth, of Connecticut.
Robert Y. Brown, of Alabama.
Monroe Hall, of New York.

H. Livingston Hartley, of Massachusetts.
Edward G. Trueblood, of Illinois.
Garret G. Ackerson, jr., of New Jersey.
Robert P. Joyce, of California.
Charles S. Reed, 2d, of Ohio.
James E. Brown, jr., of Pennsylvania.

To lie vice consuls of career
Carlos J. Warner, of Ohio.
Burton Y. Berry, of Indiana.
John S. Littell, of New York.
William P. Cochran, jr., of Pennsylvania.
Robert D. Coe, of Wyoming.
Stanley G. Slavens, of Texas.
Archibald E. Gray, of Pennsylvania.
Arthur It. Ringwalt, of Nebraska.
Morris N. Hughes, of Illinois.
Bertel E. Kuniholm, of Massachusetts.
Edmund O. Clubb, of Minnesota.
Henry S. Villa rd, of New York.
William Edwin Guy, of Missouri.
Frederick II. Ward, of New Jersey.
William W. ButterworUi, jr., of Louisiana.
Julius Wadsworth, of Connecticut.
Robert Y. Brown, of Alabama.
Monroe Hall, of New York.
H. Livingston Hartley, of Massachusetts.
Edward G. Trueblood, of Illinois.
Garret G. Ackerson, jr., of New Jersey.
Robert P. Joyce, of California.
Charles S. Reed, 2d, of Ohio.
James E. Brown, jr., of Pennsylvania.

Postmasters

Alden M. Wallace to be postmaster at Tuskegee, Ala., in place of A. M. Wallace. Incumbent's commission expires May 20, 1928.

William L. Jones to be postmaster at Parrish, Ala., in place of W. L. Jones. Incumbent's commission expires May 20, 1928.

Howard F. Little to be postmaster at Linden, Ala., in place of H. F. Little. Incumbent's commission expires May 20, 1928.

Griffin G. Guest to be postmaster at Fort Payne, Ala., in place of G. G. Guest. Incumbent's commission expires May 20, 1928.

Louie W. Vaughan to be postmaster at Cuba, Ala., in place of L. W. Vuughan. Incumbent's commission expires May 20, 1928.

Hugh H. Dale to be postmaster at Camden, Ala., in place of H. H. Dale. Incumbent's commission expires May 20, 1928.

Alaska

Charles A. Sheldon to be postmaster at Seward, Alaska, in place of C. A. Sheldon. Incumbent's commission expires May 23, 1928.

William J. Sbepard to be postmaster at Cordova, Alaska, in place of W. J. Shepard. Incumbent's commission expires May 19, 1928.

ARKANSAS

Genie O. Starnes to be postmaster at Lonnnn, Ark., in place of W. S. Edsall, removed.

Madie W. Russell to be postmaster at Star City, Ark., in place of M. W. Russell. Incumbent's commission expires May 20. 1928.

Maud Jackson to be postmaster at Sherrill, Ark., in place of Maud Jackson. Incumbent's commission expires May 26. 1928.

Elmer B. Wacaster to be postmaster at Mount Ida, Ark., in place of E. B. Wacaster. Incumbent's commission expires May 26, 1928.

Bertha E. Milliau to be postmaster at Lexa, Ark., in place of B. E. Millian. Incumbent's commission expires May 26, 1928.

John M. Phillips to be postmaster at Jasper, Ark., in place of J. M. Phillips. Incumbent's commission expires May 17. 1928.

CALIFORNIA

Homer C. Bolter to be postmaster at Vacaville, Calif., in place of S. F. Ellison, deceased.

Leslie M. McClary to be postmaster at Lomita, Calif., in place of C. M. Smith, removed.

Edward A. Rees to be postmaster at Fontaua, Calif., in place of H. S. Barbee, resigned.

Warren A. Woods to be postmaster at Suisnn City, Calif., in place of W. A. Woods. Incumbent's commission expired April 21, 1928.

Frances W. Brown to be postmaster at Moutrose, Calif., in place of F. W. Brown. Incumbent's commission expires May 14, 1928.

Nan G. Gary to be postmaster at Engelmine. Calif., in place of O. B. Camp. Incumbent's commission expired January 24, 1928.

COLORADO

James L. Allison to be postmaster at Woodmen, Colo., in place of J. L. Allison. Incumbent's commission expires May 19, 1928.

Charles V. Engert to be postmaster at Lyons, Colo., in place of C. V. Engert. Incumbent's commission expires May 26, 1928.

John C. Kessenger to be postmaster at Limon, Colo., in place of J. C. Kessenger. Incumbent's commission expires May 14, 1928.

Cora M. Nortliup to be postmaster at Fountain, Colo.. In place of C. M. Northup. Incumbent's commission expires May 26. 1928.

George Haver to be postmaster at Eckley, Colo., in place of George Haver. Incumbent's commission expires May 19. 1928.

Irving P. Beckett to be postmaster at Craig. Colo., in place of I. P. Beckett. Incumbent's commission expires May 19. 1928.

Thomas F. Beck to be postmaster at Aspen, Colo., in place of T. F. Beck. Incuml>ent's commission expires May 14, 1928.

CONNECTICUT

Frederick W. Foster to be postmaster nt Short Beach, Connin place of F. W. Foster. Incumbent's commission expires May 14, 1928.

John A. Ayer to be postmaster at Saybrook. Conn., in place of J. A. Ayer. Incumbent's commission expires May 19, 1928.

Clarence L. Clark to be postmaster at Lyme. Conn., in place of C. L. Clark. Incumbent's commission expires March 19, 1928.

William T. Crumb to be postmaster at Jewett City, Conn., in place of W. T. Crumb. Incumbent's commission expires May 19, 1928.

James F. Holden to be postmaster at Forestville-, Conn., in plrtce of J. F. Holden. Incumbent's commission expires May 19. 3928.

Edward S. Coulter to be postmaster at Essex, Conn., in place of E. S. Coulter. Incumbent's commission expires May 19, 1928.

Idaho

Lester J. Holland to be postmaster at Shelley, Idaho, in place of L. J. Holland. Incumbent's commission expires May 19, 1928.

Charles J. Shoemaker to be postmaster at Sandpoint, Idaho, in place of C. J. Shoemaker. Incumbent's commission expires May 19, 1928.

Floyd E. Reynolds to be postmaster at Ricbfleld, Idaho, in place of F. E. Reynolds. Incumbent's commission expires Mav 19. 1928.

Amanda O. Holmes to be postmaster at Plummer, Idaho, in place of A. O. Holmes. Incumbent's commission expires May 19. 1928.

Albert E. White to be postmaster at Payette, Idaho, in place of A. E. White. Incumbent's commission expires May 19, 1928.

Robert N. Molloy to be postmaster at Oroflno, Idaho, in place of R. N. Molloy. Incumbent's commission expires May 19, 1928.

Ned .lenness to be postmaster at Nampa, Idaho, in place of Ned Jenness. Incumbent's commission expires May 31. 1928.

Hugh D. Stanton to be postmaster at Kendrick, Idaho, in place of H. I). Stanton. IncumlK-nt's commission expires May

19, 1928.

Edith M. Smylie to be postmaster at Genesee, Idaho, In place of E. M. Smylie. Incumbent's commission expires May 12. 1928.

Frank Dvorak to be postmaster at Aberdeen, Idaho, in place of Frank Dvorak. Incnmlient's commission expires May 19, 1928.

ILLINOIS

Clarence C. Cary to be postmaster at Utica, 111., in place of S. K. Ijfwis, removed.

Lnnra A. Gregory to be postmaster at Willisville, 111., in place of L. A. Gregory. Incumbent's commission expires May

20. 1928.

Mark Simpson to lie postmaster at Waterman, III., in place of Mark Simpson. Incumbent's commission expires May 19, 1928.

Arthur Justus to be postmaster at Warren, 111., in place of Arthur Justus. Incumbent's commission expires May 26, 1928.

Christian Andres to be postmaster at Tinley Park, III., in place of Christian Andres. Incumbent's commission expires May 20, 1928.

LeRny Gammon to be postmaster at Thebes. 111., in place of LeKoy Gammon. Incumbent's commission expires May 26, 1928.

Edward P. Devine to be postmaster at Scimonauk, 111., in place of E. P. Devine. Incumbent's commission expires May 23, 1928.

Elizabeth R. Grant to be postmaster nt Shabbona, 111., in place of E. R. Grant. Incumbent's commission expires May 23, 1928.

Harry Hutching to 1* postmaster at Rockton, 111., in place of Harry Hutchins. Incumbent's commission expires May 20, 1928.

John N. Taffee to be postmaster at Pinckneyville. III., in place of J. N. Taffee. Incumbent's commission expires May 23, 1928.

Minor S. Miller to be postmaster at Pearl City. 111., in place of M. H. Miller. Incumbent's commission expires May 26. 5928.

Guy E. Meyers, to be postmaster at Milledgeville, 111., in place of (J. E. Meyers. Incumbent's commission expires May 20, 1928.

Irene L. Ford to l>e postmaster at Mahomet, III., in place of I. L. Ford. Incumbent's commission expires May 14, 1928.

Jessie A. Livingston to be postmaster at Livingston, 111., In place of J. A. Livingston. Incumbent's commission expires May 20. 1928.

Charles J. Ralide to be postmaster at Lena, III., in place of C. J. Rohde. Incumbent's commission expires May 14, 1928.

Olive G. Woods to be postmaster at Hcnnepin, 111., in place of O. G. Woods. Incumbent's commission expires May 23, 1928.

Andrew R. Tarbox to be postmaster at Gibson City, 111., In place of A. R. Tarbox. Incumbent's commission expires May 20. 1928.

Frank G. Robinson to be postmaster at El Paso. 111., in place of F. G. Robinson. Incumbent's commission expires May 20, 1928.

John H. Lawder to lie postmaster at Campbell Hill, 111., in place of J. H. Lawder. Incumbent's commission expires May 14. 1928.

Elliott O. Andrews to be postmaster at Belvidere. 111., in place of E. O. Andrews. Incumbent's commission expires May 23, 1928.

Joseph D. Robertson to be postmaster at Barrington, 111., in place of J. D. Robertson. Incumbent's commission expires May 26. 1928.

Francis W. Craig to be postmaster at Apple River. 111., in place of F. W. Craig. Incumbent's commission expires May 20. 1928.

INDIANA

John N. Hunter to» be postmaster at South Bend. Ind., in place of J. N. Hunter. Incumbent's commission expires May 12. 1928.

Warren B. Johnson lo be postmaster at Owensville, Ind., In place of W. B. Johnson. Incumbent's commission expires May 20, J928.

Iva I). Myers to be postmaster at Millersburg, Ind., in place of I. D. Myers. Incumbent's commission expires May 20, 1928.

Walter C. Furrell to be iHKstmuster at, Middletown, Ind., in place of W. C. Farrell. Incumbent's commission expires May 20, 1928.

Clara L. Boesen to be postmaster at Griffith, Ind.. in place of C. L. Boesen. Incumbent's commission expires May 17. 1928.

Clara A. Salla to be postmaster at Denham, Ind.. in place of C. A. Salla. Incumbent's commission expires May 20, 1928.

Iowa

Wesley Seufferlcin to be postmaster at Lake City, Iowa, in place of L. M. Freeman, resigned.

Joseph McClelland to be p istmaster at AVellman. Iowa, In place of J. A. Stump. Incumbent's commission expires May 19, 1928.

Clair A. Sodergren to be postmaster at Wayland, Iowa, in place of C. A. Sodergren. Incumbent's commission expires May 19. 1928.

Charlie C. Clifton to be postmaster at Thompson, Iowa, in place of C. C. Clifton. Incumbent's commission expires May 17, 1928.

Hazel A. Coltrane to be postmaster at Stockport, Iowa, in place of H. A. Coltrane. Incumbent's commission expires May 19. 1928.

Frank T. Best to be postmaster at Pomeroy, Iowa, in place of F. T. Best. Incumbent's commission expires May 'JO, 1928.

Solomon T. Grove to be postmaster at Plover, Iowa, in place of S. T. Grove. Incumbent's commission expires May 29, 1928.

Frank E. Moruvec to be postmaster at Oxford Junction. Iowa, in plnce of P. E. Moravec. Incumbent's commission expires May 19, 1928.

Charles E. L. See to be postmaster at Laurons. Iowa, in place of C. E. L. See. Incumbent's commission expires May 19, 1928.

Howard B. Gillespie to be postmaster at Guthrie Center, Iowa, in place of H. B. Gillespie. Incumbent's commission expires May 20. 1928.

John F. Dicus to lie postmaster nt Griswold, Iowa, in place of J. F. Dicus. Incumbent's commission expires May 19, 1928

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