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to Its chief executive officer or officers notify the city of Wilmington that the property conveyed will revert to the United States, and if the city of Wilmington does not begin or resume the performance of such improvement or maintenance within a period of six months from the date of such notice, the said property shall, upon the expiration of such period, revert to the United States without further notice or demand or any suit or proceeding. The United States reserves the right to resume ownership, possession, and control for Government purposes of the said property so conveyed at any time and without the consent of the grantee.

The bill was reported to the Senate without amendment, ordered to be engrossed for a third reading, read the third time, and passed.

ENROLLED BILLS PRESENTED

Mr. GREENE, from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported that this day that committee presented to the President of the United States the following enrolled bills:

S. 797. An act authorizing the J. K. Mabone Bridge Co., its successors and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across the Ohio Iliver at or near Wellsburg, W. Va.;

S. 1480. An act authorizing certain Indian tribes and bands, or any of them, residing in the State of Washington, to present their claims to the Court of Claims;

S. 2878. An act authorizing the Secretary of War to donate certain buildings to the city of Tucson, Ariz.;

S. 3740. An act for the control of floods on the Mississippi River and its tributaries, and for other purposes;

S. 3824. An act to correct the descriptions of land comprising the Bryce Canyon National Park as contained in the act approved June 7, 1924, entitled "An act to establish the Utah National Park in the State of Utah." and the act approved February 25, 1928. entitled "An act to change the name of the Utah National Park, the establishment of which is provided for by the act of Congress approved June 7, 1924 (43 Stat. 593), to the 'Bryce Canyon National Park," and for other purposes"; and

S. 3802. An act authorizing J. T. Burnett, his heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across the Mississippi River at or near Tiptonville, Tenn.

BILLS AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS INTRODUCED

Bills and joint resolutions were introduced, read the first time, and, by unanimous consent, the second time, and referred as follows:

By Mr. SMITH:

A bill (S. 4411) to amend the United States cotton futures act, approved August 11, 1916. as amended, by providing for the delivery of cotton tendered on futures contracts at certain designated spot cotton markets, by defining and prohibiting manipulation, by providing for the designation of cotton futures exchanges, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry.

By Mr. HALE:

A bill (S. 4412) granting an increase of pension to Elmeda E. Bowen (with accompanying papers) ; and

A bill (S. 4413) granting an increase of pension to Susan E. Dawson (with accompanying pai>ers) ; to the Committee on Pensions.

By Mr. THOMAS: '*

A bill (S. 4414) for the relief of Ella Mae Rinks; to the Committee on Claims.

A bill (S. 4415) for the relief of Josiah Harden; to the Committee on Military Affairs.

By Mr. SACKETT:

A bill (S. 4410) granting an increase of pension to Katherine H. Califf;

A bill (S. 4417) granting an increase of pension to Idella McFarland (with accompanying papers) ; and

A bill (S. 441.S) granting an increase of pension to Virginia G. Shirley (with accompanying papers) ; to the Committee on Pensions.

By Mr. CAPPER:

A bill (S. 4419) granting an increase of pension to Nancy Jane Hudson (with accompanying papers); to the Committee on Pensions.

By Mr. DILL:

A bill (S. 4120) to amend section 19 of the World War veterans' act (June 7, 1924. ch. 320. sec. 19, 43 Stat 612) providing for extension of time for filing suits under the war risk insurance act: to the Committee on Finance.

By Mr. COPELAND:

A bill (S. 4421) to award n medal of honor to John C. Whiting; to the Committee on Military Affairs.

By Mr. CUTTING:

A bill (S. 4422) to create a commission on elections, to deCne its duties, and for other purposes;

A bill (S. 4423) to prevent fraud and corrupt practices in the nomination and election of Senators and Representatives in Congress, to provide publicity of campaign accounts, and for other purposes; and

A bill (S. 4424) to regulate campaign expenditures of candidates for President and Vice President, and for other purposes; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. WATSON:

A bill (S. 4425) granting an increase of pension to Matilda M. Huddleston ; to the Committee on Pensions.

By Mr. REED of Pennsylvania:

A bill (S. 4426) granting an increase of pension to Orley A. Vawn; to the Committee on Pensions.

By Mr. FLETCHER:

A bill (S. 4427) authorizing the Secretary of Commerce to construct and equip a light vessel for the entrance to the St. Johns River, Fla.; to the Committee on Commerce.

By Mr. METCALF:

A bill (S. 4428) granting an increase of pension to Jennie Aldrich (with accompanying papers) ; to the Committee on Pensions.

By Mr. THOMAS:

A joint resolution (S. J. Res. 147) for the relief of Leah Frank, Creek Indian, new born, roll No. 294; to the Committee on Indian Affairs.

By Mr. ODDIE:

A joint resolution (S. J. Res. 148) authorizing the President to appoint A. Camplx-ll Turner to the Foreign Service of the United States; to the Committee on Foreign Relations.

By Mr. CUTTING:

A joint resolution (S. J. Res. 149) proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United Slates, relative to the nomination or election of Members of Congress, President, and Vice President of the United States; and

A joint resolution (S. J. K«>s. 150) proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, relating to eligibility of Members of Congress; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

AMENDMENT TO TAX REDUCTION BILL—INTERNATIONAL BRIDGES

Mr. COPELAXD submitted an amendment intended to be proposed by him to House bill 1, the tax reduction bill, which was ordered to lie on the table and to be printed.

SURPLUS REAL PROPERTY OF WAR DEPARTMENT

Mr. SWANSON submitted an amendment intended to be proposed by him to the bill (H. R. 111)53) to authorize the sale under the provisions of the act of March 12, 1926 (Public. No. 45, 69th Cong.), of surplus War Department real property, which was referred to the Committee on Military Affairs and ordered to be printed.

AMENDMENT TO SECOND DEFICIENCY APPROPRIATION BILL

Mr. ODDIE submitted an amendment providing that the unexpended balance of the appropriation of .$50.000 for the survey and examination of water-storage reservoir sites on the headwaters of the Truckee River, and for other punwses, contained in the act making appropriations for the Department of the Interior for the fiscal year 1928. shall remain available during the fiscal year 1929 for the same purposes, including test Iwrings, and also for the survey and examination of water-storage reservoir sites on the Carson River, investigations of dam sites at such storage reservoirs and estimates of costs, with recommendations in regard thereto, etc., intended to be proposed by him to the second deficiency appropriation bill, which was referred to the Committee on Appropriations and ordered to be printed.

CHANGE OF REFERENCE

Mr. JONES. House bill 10786, a bill authorizing surveys and investigations to determine the best methods and means of utilizing I be waters of the Gila River and its tributaries above the San Carlos Reservoir in New Mexico and Arizona, was referred to the Committee on Commerce. That committee has examined the bill and it ought to go to the Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation. I move that the Committee on Commerce be discharged from the further consideration of the bill and that it be referred to the Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation.

The motion was agreed to.

COMMITTEK SERVICE

On motion of Mr. Watson and by unanimous consent, it was—

Ordered, That Mr. Kkyes be excused from further service as a member

of the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry and that he be assigned

to service upon tile Committee on Kinanre; that Mr. Fuss be excused

from further service as a member of the Committee ou Finance ami that he be assigned to service upon the Committee on Foreign Relations, and that Mr. Cutting be assigned to service on the Committee on Agriculture and Forestry.

CON8TEUCT1ON OF CERTAIN NAVAL VESSELS PROPOSED UNANIMOUSCONSENT AGREEMENT

Mr. HALE. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that to-morrow afternoon, immediately after the close of the services in memory of the late Senator Willis, of Ohio, the Senate i>roceed to tlie consideration of Calendar No. 1022, the bill (H. R. 11526) to authorize the construction of certain naval vessels, and for other purposes

Mr. SMOOT. I object.

Mr. HALE. I would like to state my proposition. I ask unanimous consent that the Senate proceed to the consideration of the bill I have indicated immediately after the close of the inn-vices in memory of the late Senate Willis, of Ohio, and that the Senate continue with such consideration until 6 o'clock; that at that time, if the bill has not been disposed of, a recess bo taken until 8 o'clock p. m., and that thereafter the consideration of the bill be continued until 10.30 o'clock, unless sooner disposed of.

Mr. SMOOT. I object.

Mr. KINO and Mr. LA FOLLETTB. I object

Mr. JOHNSON. I object also, if any further objection be needed.

The VICE PRESIDENT. Objection is made.

BOULDER DAM

Mr. ASHURST. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent to have printed in the Record at this point an address delivered yesterday before the Federal Trade Commission by Hon. Louis W. Douglas, Representative in Congress from the State of Arizona, in which he urges the Federal Trade Commission to investigate the insidious and odious lobby which is here and elsewhere attempting to pass the Boulder Dam bill. I also ask to have printed in the Record an editorial from the San Diego TimesUnion on this subject. I desire to have these printed in the Record at this Juncture and not in the Appendix. May I secure such permission?

The VICE PRESIDENT. Without objection, it is so ordered.

The address and editorial are as follows:

STATEMENT Or LOl'IS W. DOUGLAS, MEMBER Of CONGRESS FBOM ARIZONA, BEFORE THE FEDERAL TttADE COMMISSION MAI 9, 1928

Members Of The Federal Trade Commission: I have seen the recent reports of evidence submitted to you relative publicity activities with reference to the Boulder Dam bill pending before Congress.

J appear as a Member of Congress to suggest to you a course of Inquiry In this connection, which falls within the general authority given to you by Senate Resolution 83 of the Seventieth Congress, first session, to Inquire Into and to report to the Senate whether, and to what extent corporations doing an Interstate or international business "in supplying electrical energy, or any officers thereof or anyone In their behalf, or any organization of which any such corporation may be a member, through the expenditure of money or through the control of the avenues of publicity have made any and what effort to Influence or control public opinion on account of municipal or public ownership of the men Un by which power is developed and electrical energy is generated and distributed, or since 1923 to Influence or control elections."

Tlie city of Los Angeles is a corporation. The Los Angeles Bureau of Light and Tower of the City of Los Angeles is engaged In the production and distribution of electric energy and in interstate commerce.

Its activities to persuade the Congress of the United States to appropriate moneys for the construction of the largest of power projects are proper subjects of inquiry by your commission. Its activities in connection with State legislation are likewise proper subjects of Inquiry for this commission.

In 1917 the city of Los Angeles was successful In preventing the California Legislature from passing an net which would subject all dams In California to a rigid Inspection by the State engineers. The bill pro

viding for Inspection (ch. 377, Calif. Stat. forty-second legislative session), as amended through the influence of the city of Los Angeles, specifically exempted from State inspection dams built by a municipality with an engineering department. The St. Francis Dam in California was constructed without a State license, without State inspection, and in violation of the water rights of the people in the Santa Clara Valley. The dam failed. The city of Los Angeles, through Its great political power, went Into Owens Valley and confiscated water, the right to which belonged to the Inhabitants of Owens Valley. The city of Los Angeles la now attempting to persuade the Federal Government to appropriate the moneys for a high-power dam at Boulder Canyon and to confiscate the resources of States.

In the early part of February, 1922, before Boulder Canyon had been adequately Investigated, the city of Los Angeles appropriated to the United States Reclamation Service for the Investigation of that site, and for the Investigation of no other site, $75,000, In support of which I call your attention to the following resolution:

"On presentation by special counsel, and on his recommendation and of the chief engineer and chief electrical engineer—the matter being considered at some length—Mr. Ilaynes moved the adoption of the following resolution:

"' Whereas the city has made application to the Federal Power Confmlssion for license or permit to develop the Boulder Canyon Reservoir on the Colorado River with a view of obtaining from that source sufficient power for the future needs of Los Angeles; and

"' Whereas it is practicable to obtain such Information through the United States Reclamation Service which, if provided with the necessary funds, proposes to complete investigations on the ground which will disclose the facts required, as aforesaid; and

"' Whereas the cost to the city of obtaining such necessary Information If It should Itself be required to do the proper investigation work, would be greatly In excess of the amount to be paid the Unltid States Reclamation Service for supplying such Information; and

"'Whereas said Reclamation Service estimates that the amount required of the city of Los Angeles for said purpose would be $75,000, nnd has Indicated that said amount might be paid In Installments conforming to the needs of said Reclamation Service for such work us It progresses; and It appearing to be to the best interests of the city und this board, in fulfilling the public duty to provide an ample power supply for the inhabitants of Los Angeles, that this board should undertake to advance said amount for said purposes: Therefore be it

"' Re&vlvcd, That this board, out of power revenue, undertake to advance and pay to the United States Reclamation Service the sum of $75,000 to carry on the work of said Reclamation Service in investigating the site of the proposed dam at Boulder Canyon on the Colorado River for the purpose aforesaid, subject to the condition that the results of said Investigation be furnished this board; that such payment be made in Installments; that a demand for the Initial installment of said sum, to wit, $15,000, be drawn on the power-revenue fund In favor of the United States Reclamation Service.'

"Seconded by Mr. Bartlett, and carried by the following vote:

"Ayes: Messrs. Bartlett, Haynes, Robinson, the president.

"Noes: None. (Twenty minutes of the board of public service commissioners, city of Los Angeles, pp. 115-116, special meeting, February 16, 1922.)

You will note that the purpose of the appropriation for the Investigation was "to provide for an ample power supply for the inhabitants of Los Angeles." You will also note that the appropriation was for the investigation of the Boulder Canyon site, and Boulder Canyon site only.

Dr. Elwood Mead, In a letter addressed to itfe under date of April 6, 1928, transmuted a statement disclosing that up to June HO, 1027, the city of Los Angeles, Imperial Irrigation district. Cnacncllu Valley district, Palo Verde levee district, and the city of Pasadena had appropriated $140,000 for the investigation of Boulder Canyon. The Reclamation Service was restricted In Its use of funds for the Investigation of the Colorado River to Boulder Canyon, in that it could not expend those funds for an Investigation elsewhere except In so far as the Federal Government appropriated such funds. I inclose herewith a statement submitted by Doctor Mead.

Statement referred to:

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[merged small][table]

It la clear that the city of Los Angeles and affiliated agencies, through their control of the investigating moneys, Influenced the Reclamation Service to support Boulder Canyon as the Bite. In view of the subsequent activities of the city of Los Angeles and affiliated agencies, It Is equally clear that the city of Los Angeles abandoned the Idea of constructing a power project on the Colorado River with Its own funds and supported Instead the proposition of obtaining funds from the Federal Treasury for this purpose.

To carry out its ends there was organized In southern California an organization known as the Itoulder Dam Association, of which the city of Los Angeles is a member. This association has been one of the groat lobbying organizations In behalf of the Boulder Dam bill. In 1924 its secretary wag Mr. Burdette Moody, who was also business manager of the board of public service commissioners of the city of Los Angeles.

The statement of receipts, July 10, 1924, audited by W. M. Irwin, auditor, shows sources of revenue of the Boulder Dam Association as of that date, a copy of which I inclose herewith:

Sources of revenue of the Boulder Dam Association:

Ileceipts from beginning $9.060.00

Imperial irrigation district 4.750.00

Lo« Angeles Bureau of Power and Light—

To Sun Diego office 1.000.00

To Los Angeles office 3,730.00

Cities meeting at Santa Ana 385.00

United States veterans of Kl Centro 10. 00

Spruce Farm Center of Brawley 20. 00

City of Sail Bernardino 15.00

Total 19, 570. 00

By S. C. Evans, executive director.

Audited by M. W. Irwin, auditor. Statement of receipts, July 19, 1924, City Hall, Long Beach, 'Calif.

In March, 1924, the city of Log, Angeles passed the following resolution: t

"On written recommendation of the special counsel by Floyd M. Hinshnw, Mr. Dyltstra moved the adoption of the following resolution:

"' Whereas the city of Los Angeles is vitally interested in the matter of Inducing Congress to provide the nece.ssary funds for the construction of a high storage dam at or near Boulder Canyon on the Colorado River, because of the fact that such ditm, besides injuring protection to Imperial Valley and other menaced sections against the floods of the Colorado Biver and greatly extending irrigation in the lower Colorado Basin, will make possible the development of a great amount of hydroelectric power; and

"' Whereas an organization known as Boulder Dam Association, composed of representatives of the various municipalities, districts, and communities Interested in said project, has been formed for the purpose of providing such publicity, arid such organization Is to be supported and financed by participating public agencies, and it appears desirable that the city of Los Angeles, us a member of such organization, should contribute its share of the legitimate expense of such publicity work: Now, therefore, be it

"' Kruolred, That a demand for $2r>0 in favor of the Boulder Dam Association be, and the same is hereby, ordered drawn and approved on the "power revenue fund."'

"Seconded by Mr. Baker and carried by the following vote:

"Ayes: M'essrs. Baker, Burton, Dykstra. the president.

"Noes: None." (Twenty-fourth minutes of the board of public service commissioners, city of Los Angeles, p. 484. March 21, 1924.)

On June 12, 1923, there was authorized an additional amount, not to exceed $1,500 per month, to the Boulder Dam Association, $1.000 of which was thereupon ordered drawn upon the power revenue fund. (Twenty-third minutes of the board of public service commissioners, city of Los Angeles, pp. 21, 22, 94, 95.)

On February 19, l'.)24, a sum of $500 was voted for the same purposes. (Twenty-fourth minutes of the board of public service commissioners, city of Los Angeles, pp. 12, 370, February 19, 1924.)

On April 30, 1928, I am informed that the Ims Angeles Public Service Commissioners appropriated another $14000 for the purpose of persuading Congress to construct a high dam at Boulder Canyon. How much In addition Ims Angeles may have directly or indirectly appropriated to the Boulder Dam Association to Influence public opinion I can not now testify to.

The Boulder I>am Association has published many pamphlets which it has distributed to the public and to the Members of Congress, copies of which I submit herewith. The purpose of the publication was to influence public opinion and the opinion of Congress.

In 1923 the public service commissioners of Ix>s Angeles passed the following resolution:

"' He it resolved, That Ralph L. Criswell. president of the council, and W. B. Mathews. special counsel, be authorized to proceed to Washington, D. C., to give attention to the interests of the city as involved in the Swing-Johnson bill, pending before Congress, for the development of the Colorado Ulver, and that their necessary expenses in the matter be paid by the department out of the power revenue fund.'

"Seconded by Mr. Dykstra and carried by the following vote:

"Ayes: Messrs. Baker, Dykstra. Haynes, the president.

"Noes: None." (Twenty-second minutes of the board pf public service commissioners, city of Los Angeles, pp. 21, 182, January 16, 1923.)

The representatives of the Boulder Dam Association and of the city of Los Angeles, together with representatives of the Imperial Irrigation district, to which reference will later be made, have been constantly present at all of the hearings on the Boulder Dam bill and have been in constant contact with Members of Congress for the purpose of persuading them to support the proposed legislation.

The Imperial irrigation district has been active in other ways. I submit herewith as evidence the following, taken from a statement submitted by officials of the Imperial Irrigation district, which will be found on pages 257-258. part 2, hearings before the House Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation on H. R. 2093, Sixty-eighth Congress:

1918. 1919. 1922.

1923.

Condu 1024.

1924.

Various payments and expenses of directors, representatives, presenting valley's problems $31, 641. 24

Various payments and expenses of directors, representatives, presenting valley's problems 25,348.60

Expenses of directors and representatives attending conferences with Secretary of the Interior. State and county institutions, American L/eglou, and other civic bodies 10,672.38

Expenses of directors and representatives attending conferences with Secretary of the Interior. State and county institutions, American I/egion, and other civic' budies I 20.523.30

ding congressional party through Imperial Valley 15,078.82

Kxpenses of directors and representatives attending conferences with Secretary of the Interior and arid lands committee at Washington, D. C 3, 193. 26

Advances made to various representatives of district

to cover expenses while in Washington, D. C 2.250.00

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Total 109. 607. 60

I submit an analysis of the fl5.978.82 Item fur conducting a congressional party through Imperial Valley:

Analyfig of expenditure* in connretlon Kith the conducting of eonifret

tional forty to Imperial Valley duriiitl the month of Mareh, K2.1 Expenses, Including railroad and Pullman fares, hotels, meals, and miscellaneous items for—

It. I). Mel'heiTln

J. Stewart Koss

C. \V. Brockman

F. II. Melver

J. S. Nkkerson

B. 1). Irvine

Elmer W. Heald. American Legion

F. W. Greer

Mark Itose

Karl Pound

Ira Aton

1'hil I). Swing

Ray S. Carberry

Rental moving-picture projection machine

Expenses of congressional party at—

Glenwood Hotel. Riverside

Barbara Worth Hotel

Labor and material and train expense, miscellaneous labor

and material. Andnide

Southern Trust & Commerce, advanced for expenses—Pullman and meals 1,664. OO

Refund on sale of banquet tickets 102. 50

Southern Pacific Co.. rail. Pullman fares, and meals 1, 751. 14

Kodak supplies for congressional party 30. 30

Photographs of congressional party 10. 00

Drnyage on congressional party's baggtige M. 5O

Printing of banquet cords 20.75

Southern Pacific Co., Pullman and rail fares of congressional

party 8, 951. 54

Telegrams and telephone tolls 25. 57

J'hotographs, Keystone service i'O. 00

Barbara Worth-Hotel, miscellaneous 78.06

Miscellaneous unallocated charges 111. 20

Total 15, 978. 82

E. E. Kiefhr, Chief Accountant.

The above Items were submitted by E. E. Kiefer, chief accountant. Imperial Irrigation district.

I am Informed that Mr. John R. Haynen, one of the public service commissioners of the city of Los Angeles, has been very liberal hi his donations to the Boulder Dnm lobby.

How much may have been expended, either in cash or in kind, since 1924 I do not know, but I submit that if, an of that date, before the bill had reached the stage in its legislative career at which It might have been considered by the House, $129,177.60 (the sum of expenditures by the Boulder Dam Association and the Imperial Irrigation district) had been expended In its behalf, then, as of this date, It Is reasonable, to conclude that at least four times that amount has been expended.

In this connection I call the attention of this commission to the special train which came to Washington in 1927, carrying lobbyists for the Boulder Dam bill; I call the attention of this commission to the many news advertisements containing large photographs and blacktyped narrative of the Boulder Dam, and of the merits of the bill under consideration, which have appeared very frequently throughout the past few years in the Hearst newspapers and in the tabloids. I call the attention of this commission to the many boxes of grapefruit and oranges which have been presented to the Members of the Congress. I call the attention of this commission to the speeches which have been made throughout the country by representatives of the Imperial irrigation district and of the city of Los Angeles. I call the attention of this commission to the great number of Callfornians now in Washington lobbying for the Boulder Dam bill. I call the attention of this commission to an appropriation of $20.000 by (he board of supervisors of Ims Angeles County on May 3, 1928, for the purpose of lobbying for the Boulder Dam bill.

I have submitted evidence, which is conclusive, that over $129,000 was expended in behalf of the Boulder Dam bill as of the middle of the year 1024. I have Indicated to this commission many other additional items for which moneys have been expended, the purpose of which was to influence public opinion and the Congress.

LXIX 520

I submit to this commission that In view of the activities of the city of Los Angeles and other California municipalities in amending the dam inspection bill of 1917 to exclude municipalities from Slate supervision, and In view of the activities of the city of Los Angeles through the use of Its great political power with relation to the inhabitants of the Owens and Santa Clam Valleys in California, and in view of the activities of the city of Los Angeles and affiliated agencies, not only In exerting its great political power but also in expending huge sums of money to Influence public opinion und the Members of Congress to support Federal ownership of n tremendous power project, one can not but conclude that activities by political subdivisions to Influence public opinion can be as Insidious and as dangerous to the body politic as can be the activities of any other type of organization.

[From the San Diego Union, April 20, 1928J

IMPERIAL ASKS SAN DIKftO AID OS DAM KfNDH—$100,000 TO BK KAISKD KOK LO1IBY IN WASHINGTON ON BOTLDKII BILL LKOISLATION

The people of Imperial County are looking to the people of San Diego County to help them In the common cause of putting through the Boulder Canyon Dam legislation, according to C. A. Hall and George Whltlock, of the American Conservation Club of the Imperial Valley, who arc in San Diego seeking funds to help In the last push In Washington.

"The people of the Imperial Valley are spending $100,000 this year to maintain the necessary lobby In Washington," said Hall yesterday. "Legislation of this nature Is costly, and we are flghtlng the wealthiest and best-organized opposition lobby that ev^r went to Washington. The people of the valley can't carry all the load, and they are appealing to San Diego County, which will benefit almost as much as Imperial from the dam construction, to help carry on the work and to put over the legislation.

"This bill will do more for southern California than any other legislation ever initiated. It will produce enormous publicity all over the country. Thousands of people are Just waiting for the passage of the bill to come to southern California, and I firmly believe that real-estato values will increase 10 per cent within 24 hours after President Coolidge signs the bill.

"This Is a worthy and necessary cause. The San Diego Chamber of Commerce and many leading citizens here have given It their full indorsement, and the chamber Is going to help all It can with funds. But it Is necessary for us to make an appeal to the citizens of the community to help with funds now. The time Is short, and we want the people of San Diego to help and help now."

EXCHANGE QUOTATIONS AND EUROPEAN CURRENCY

Sir. COPELAND. Mr. President, may I have the attention of the Senator from Nevada [Mr. Oddie] V I desire to ask the Senator what has l>ecome of Senate Resolution 95, referred to the Committee on Mines and Mining, providing for the reprinting of Senate document serial 8 on foreign exchange quotations and European currency and finance. Early in January I introduced a resolution (S. Res. 95) calling for the republication of that Senate document.

Mr. ODDIE. Mr. President, the Committee on Mines and Mining expect to have a meeting in a very short time with reference to that matter. I want to say that I consider the resolution a very important one. The subject matter included in it is worthy of the grave attention of the Senate, and I hope that something will result.

Mr. COPELAND. May I inquire if there is any opposition in the Senate to the project?

Mr. ODDIE. I have not heard of any opposition. It has not been brought before the Senate.

Mr. COPELAND. Does the Senator know of any Senator who is in opposition to it?

Mr. ODDIE. There was opposition to it two years ago from various Senators, but I think it. can l>e explained in a very satisfactory manner to them at this time.

Mr. COPELAND. May I inquire of the Senator from Utah [Mr. Smoot] what his attitude is regarding the matter of the reprinting of the Senate document relating to foreign exchange quotations and Euro|>ean currency and finance? I know that he has given much thought to the matter. There are so many inquiries coming from every section of the country that I am very eager to have the Committee on Mines and Mining take action in the mutter. Does the Senator from Utah know of any opposition to the republication?

Mr. SMOOT. Mr. President, unless there is some real demand for it I can not see why It should be reprinted. There were a great many copies printed originally.

Mr. COPELAND. What would the Senator consider a great demand? I think I have had a letter from every bank in the United States and from every college and from everyone in the United States interested in the subject of nuance. Is that a demand?

Mr. SMOOT. I do not know when those banks asked the Senator, but I do know the original issue was sent to banks wherever they asked for it up to the time this resolution was submitted.

Mr. COPELAND. May I ask the Senator in all kindness and with deference if he Is opposed to the matter?

Mr. SMOOT. I would be opposed to it unless there is a real call for the document. I have never received a request from nnyone except those to whom I sent copies of the document when it was originally published.

Mr. COPELAND. I shall take pleasure In showing to the Senator from Utah a great stack of requests from every part of the country for the publication brought up to date. I believe, without knowing anything about it personally, from the character of the persons who have inquired and the nature of the requests, that it must be a very valuable document.

Mr. SMOOT. I shall be glad to have the Senator submit the requests to me.

Mr. WALSH of Montana. Mr. President, may I inquire of the Senator from New York why he did not have the resolution referred to the Committee on Printing?

Mr. COPELAND. Because, in the first place, the report was gotten out by the Committee on Mines and Mining, and in order to bring it up to (late there must be some further work done on it that seems to be within the purview of that committee.

Mr. WALSH of Montana. I understood that the resolution merely provided for a reprint.

Mr. COPELAND. It provides for a little more than that. It says:

Tlie Committee on Mines and Mining bo, and Is hereby, authorized to revise to date and publish with illustrations—

And so forth. That, apparently, would require some little work.

ANNIVERSARY OF DEATH OF STONK.WALL JACKSON

Mr. BLEASE. Mr. President, on the 10th day of May, 1863, there passed away at Guinea Station, Va., one of the greatest generals this country has ever known. My State, South Carolina, set apart that day as Confederate Memorial Day. I ask to have printed in the Record an article furnished me by Miss Anna Jackson Preston, sponsor for the South at the reunion at Little Rock on this day, being a short sketch of the life of her great grandfather, Gen. Stonewall Jackson.

I also ask to have printed an address delivered by Dr. W. E. Abernethy to the Daughters of the Confederacy at Statesville, N. C., on May 10, lf>27, and a short article by Bishop Charles B. Galloway.

There being no objection, the articles and address were ordered to be printed in the Recokd, as follows: Stonewall Jackson

Thomas Jonathan Jackson, usually known as Stonewall Jackson, was born In Clarksburg. Va., now West Virginia, on the 20th day of January, 1824. He died at Guinea Station. Va., on the 10th day of May, 186H, being 39 years of age. He was the son of Jonathan Jackson, of Clarksburg, a promising and well-to-do young lawyer, and his beautiful and accomplished wife, Julia Beckwith Nenle. His great grandfather, John Jackson, the first of the line in America, by birth a Scotch-Irishman, came from London about 1748, and located first in Maryland and later the western portion of Virginia. The .lacksous became In time quite a numerous family, owning large boundaries of mountain land. They were noted for their honesty, indomitable wills, and physical courage, holding many positions of public trust and honor in what was then known as western Virginia.

EARLY CHILDHOOD

When Thomas Jonathan Jackson was 3 years of age his father died with typhoid fever, contracted while he was nursing his little daughter who also died. He left a widow and three children In very limited circumstances. Mrs. Jackson, afk-r recovering in a degree from the double shock—the death of her daughter and husband—supported her little family as best she could with her needle and by teaching school for about three years when she married Ciipt. Blake B. Wooilson, a gentlemjin from eastern Virginia, of excellent family and delightful manners but visionary and unsuccessful. When her health became Impaired the children were placed temporarily with relatives. A year later Jackson's mother died, and thus at the age of 7 he was left a penniless orphan.

One story most characteristic of him is that when about 12 years of age be appeared at the house of Federal Judge John G. Jackson in Clarksburg, and addressed his wife, saying, "Aunt, Uncle Brake (referring to the relative he was then living with] and I don't agree. 1 have quit him and will never go buck any more." He never did, but walked 18 miles to the farm of Cummins Jackson, bachelor half-brother of his father. There he lived happily until he was appointed to West Point through the political Influence of his Uncle Cummins, at the age of 18.

Before going to West Point he held big only political office, that of constable, and satisfactorily discharged the duties of the office.

The first year at West Point, having had but Indifferent preparation, he stood near the foot of the class, but each year by dint of untiring study he advanced steadily until he graduated No. 17 In a class of CO. One of his professors remarked that If there had been one more year In the course before graduation he would have led kbj class.

In Mexico

After graduating at West Point in 1840 he at once went to the Mexican war and served with distinction in the battles there, coming out brevet major, with a noble reputation for bravery and extremely popular with the Mexican people of the higher classes for whom he entertained to the end of his life great admiration.

AT LKXIXCTOX, VA.

In lS.r>l lie became professor of military tactics at the Virginia Military Institute. Lexington, Va., known as the West Point of the South, at a salary of $l.l!uo per year and a residence. Lexington wag at that time a small town in the midst of the Bine Kldge Mountains, also the seat of Washington College, now Washington-Lee I'niverslty. The community at that time was largely dominated by the Presbyterian Church, whose pastor was Rev. William S. White, for whom Jackson formed t great affection. General Jnrkson wns deeply Interested In religious matters, and though baptised In the Episcopal Church, Joined the Presbyterian Church the first year he was in Lexington.

In 18.">:$ lie married Miss Eleanor Junkin, daughter of Pr. C,eor?e Junkin, president of Washington College. In a year his wife died. The young husband was heartbroken and his thoughts turned more than ever to religion. In fact, it was at this time that his Intense religious nature began to assert itself outwardly.

In is.j."> Jackson and Col. J. T. L. Preston, who wag subsequently

his adjutant general, organized a Sunday school for negroes In Lex

i Ington. Some local antagonism was aroused against them torcatiM

slaves were taught to rojul and write in this school. The school was

carried on successfully, however, up to the outbreak of the war.

On the 16th day of July, 1857. he was married to Miss Mary Anna Morrison, of Lincoln County, N. C., the daughter of L>r. Robert Hall Morrison, who founded Davidson College, Davidson, N. C., and Mary Graham Morrison, a gister of Gov. William A. Graham, of North Caroliua.

IN TIIK WAR BETWEEN THE STATES

Though opposed to secession, Jackson, like many of the leading citizens of the South, was equally opposed to the coercion of the Southern States; and, therefore, promptly offered his services to the State of Virginia when war was declared against It, believing tli.it big first and highest loyalty was to bis native State.

Jackson had l>oen commissioned by the Governor of Virginia '.o take charge of the State militia detailed to keep the peace during the trial and execution of John Brown at Charlestowu in 1X59. la a letter to his wife he gave an Interesting account of this occurrence. At the actual outbreak of hostilities he spent his time drilling soldiers. H< was then made colonel of the Virginia State troops. First at Manassas, he was given his famous sobriquet of "Stonewall,'1 by General Bee, of South Carolina. His promotions to brigadier, major general, and lieutenant general were very rapid. His fame as a soldier regts largely upon what Is known as the valley campaign, where in rapid succession he won a series of brilliant victories—M'cPowell, Winchester, Port Hepublic, Cross Keys, and Cedur Mountain. Of these he himself is said to have considered Cedar Mountain his greatest victory.

On May 3, !SO:t. in the midst of the brilliant victory at Chancellorsville, he was wounded by bis own men, usually supposed to belong to one of the North Carolina regiments, and died a week later.

After half n century has elapsed, it Is hard to realize the feelings of sorrow and hopelessness which swept over the South when the news of Jackson's death flashed along the wires. Everywhere men and women broke down and cried as though a beloved memlKT of their own family had been taken. When the news of his death reached Europe the newsboys and porters In the hotels announced that "Stonewall Jackson was doiid," for his was a familiar name throughout the world. The people of all nations felt a great soldier and a noble Christian hero had fallen, while in the hearts of the people of the South there was n deep and unexpressed fear that the cause which they loved so well had suffered an Irreparable blow the day his casket with the Confederate flag wrapped around it was placed In the cemetery at Lexington.

It Is not our purpose to attempt any eulogy of Jackson's career as .1 soldier. The English historian, Colonel Henderson, probably the greatest military critic of the nineteenth century, says that he was in no way inferior to Wellington. Napoleon, Lee, or any of the great generals of history. lie was one of the few generals who was never defeated, and Without any effort on his part maintained the confidence and admiration •nd, one might say, the adoration of all his troops.

AITEARANCE AXD CHARACTERISTICS

In private life Jackson was n simple, rather silent Scotch-Irish, Presbyterian gentleman, with large blue eyes, pensive and deep; dnrkbrowu hair, which was very slightly curly and worn rather long; about

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