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MEN1FEE COUNTY

I know that It obtains in Menifee County. There n bond issue for $50,000 was voted. Their total revenue is $8,400.40. In that county eight bridges were destroyed or badly damaged and 15 miles of road destroyed. The estimate of their damage is $15,350. This county has a population (1920 eensus) of 5,779, with an area of 203 square miles. The assessed valuation for 1927 was $1,173,920, with the first recapitulation for 1928, $1,076,587.

MORGAN COUNTY

There were 12 persons drowned in this county, 50 bridges badly damaged or destroyed. 323 miles of road damaged. It is a county having a population (1920) of 10,518, with an area of 3G5 square mjles. The assessed valuation for 1927, $3.935,920, with the first recapitulation for 1928, $3.103,539. The total income from all sources, $23,000. The road fund, $3,500 per year. A road-bond issue of $200,000 was vctrd, but only $170,000 could be issued as valid securities, they having in addition a floating debt of $90,000. The estimate from this county called for $37,800, but in this amount it is shown that they contrnyplated the use of free labor in this work of rehabilitation.

Mr. Manlove. You say that those estimates come from the counties themselves?

Mr. Vinson. The county officials submitted the estimates. The State highway commission made a survey to see that these estimates were not in excess of the actual need. As I understand it, the State highway commission does not approve these estimates as being sufficient to do the Job. Is that corivct, Major Ilelburn?

Major IlELBriiN. Yes, sir.

Mr. Mant/ove. But that undoubtedly is not in excess of the amount required.

Mr. Vinson. No; it is considerably less than the amount required.

Referring again to the road bonds issued by this county, I submit that this expression at the polls in which bonds in excess of the constitutional amount permitted is voted is indicative of the road spirit which prevails in this section.

Mr. Mani.ovb. You arc In that section of the State which they call the lowlands?

Mr. Vinsox. No; I am in the mountains. My home In in Lawrence County, which is situated in the northern part of the mountain section.

Mr. Brand. You have to have just about as many roads in the poorer counties as in the rich?

Mr. Vinson. Yes, sir; and we need bridges more than in the lower levels of the State.

If you will visualize a deep chasm sometimes GO feet in depth spanned by a bridge, the church and the school on the one side serves the community on the other. Then have the bridge washed off. You can not jump the creek or the river. Ofttimes you can not get to the creek in any conveyance. It is necessary to go around. Ofttimes It is necessary to go miles to reach the spot where you could have gone in just a few minutes if the bridge remained. Ofttimes it Is a fast-moving stream; flood waters will come, and in such condition a passage Is not possible, except attended with grave danger.

Mr. AbMiiN. You can not use ferries on streams like that?

Mr. Vinson. No; they are mountain streams, and you could not use ferries on them.

Major Hki.buhn. A short time ago a statement was made relative to the cost of roads in the mountain section. Let me say that in Perry County some of the through roads cost two or three times as much as they do in the lower levels.

Mr. Vinson. It is unquestionably more than it would be in the counties in the central portion of the State. If you have good roads, over which the road material may be transported, the cost is very much less, but when you have to haul road material 20 miles over a mountain trail to build a bridge that cost in itself mounts high.

BKEATIIITT COUNTY

Breathitt County gave up four persons in death as a result of this flood. There were six bridges and 80 miles of road damaged and destroyed. These bridges range In length from 100 to 250 feet, and the estimate submitted for the bridges is $02,000; the estimate for the road*. $80.000, making a total of $172,000.

This county in 1920 had a population of 20,014; its area composed of 483 square miles. The assessed valuation of its property for 1027, $4.100,008. The first recapitulation for 1928 was $3,404,830. I do not have the exact amount of its annual income and its Indebtedness, but I do not hesitate to say that it has voted road bonds up to the full amount permitted by law.

BOWAN COUNTY

Rowan County had n population in 1920 of 9,467 persons, with an area of 272 square miles. The estimate submitted In the report is the sum of $20,400 to replace one bridge at Clearfield and 30 miles of road. Seventeen miles of road was totally destroyed and 5 miles practically destroyed. The total Income of this county was $18,800 for 1927, of which amount it allocated $4,000 to the road fund, which

included a State truck check of around $3.000. Its floating indebtedness is only $10,000, which was created to expend on the roads and bridges damaged by the flood. The assessed valuation for Rowan County for 1027, $3.115,499, with practically the same amount for 1928. Eoad bonds voted In this county total $150,000. This county has a bond Issue, which is only limited by the constitutional prohibition as to amount.

WOLFE COUNTY

This estimate submitted in the sum of $7,000, of which amount $2,000 was to replace two bridges, and the remainder, $5,000, was to repair and replace 25 miles of road. In this county they have a bond Issue which is only limited by the constitutional prohibition as to amount. The assessed valuation for 1927 for this county, $1,S10.481; the first recapitulation for 1928. $1,419,658. Wolfe County had (1930 census) population of 8,783 with an area of 230 square miles.

CARTER COUNTY

Officials from this county submit an estimate of $35,000 to replace or repair 100 miles of road at the rate of $300 per mile, together with 25 small bridges ut an average cost of $200 each. The assessed valuation of Carter County for 1927 was $0.847,569. The first recapitulation for 1928, $5.987,545. Its population (1920 eensus) w*g 22,474; its area, 413 square miles. Many years ago they voted a road bond issue, and in recent years, as I recall it, they have voted two additional bond issues for use in the construction of roads. They are up to the constitulioual limit.

LAWKKNCE COUNTY

The officials In this county submitted an estimate of $13,500 to take care of 6 bridges and 25 miles of road. The total revenue from all sources in tMs county is $110.000 per year, with a road and bridge fund of $20.000. floating debt of $37,000, and road bonds in the amount of $250.000. The assessed valuation of Lawrence County in 1927 was $7.022,035; first recapitulation, 1928, $6,055,721. Population in 1020 was 17.043, and it covers an area of 422 square miles.

You have heard Major Ilelburn, of the State highway commission, say that the State will expend $10,000,000 in this flood area within the next few years. The question has been asked here, why can't f the State bear this entire burden. In the past eight years there has been a road-building campaign carried on In Kentucky. This is evidenced by the fact that more than 90 counties in Kentucky have voted a bond issue in order to contribute the proceeds thereof to the State for road-building purposes. In practically all these counties the State has either spent three times as much money as the county voted or has promised to expend State funds upon a 3-1 basis, and the funds of the State under these pledges have been allocated for the next several years.

Then there is the constitutional limitation of the State indebtedness. This prohibits the is-sual of State bonds to meet this emergency. Many of these roads are not on the State highway system, which precludes the expenditure of State funds upon them. I take it that the legislature now in session will look to that end as well as the other legislation necessary to permit the State to do the things required under this bill ere Federal contribution can be had.

My friends. I want to close my remarks by rending an editorial from the Jackson Times, published In Jackson, Ky. Breathitt County is in my district; It possesses a fine type of manhood and womanhood. This editorial, I state to you, is typical of the spirit which prevailed in that section of the country when the friends from the lowlands extended a neighborly band to their friends of the highlands. This editorial Is typical of the minds and the hearts of the Kentucky people.

It is dated June 10, following closely after the flood.

IXjctor McCoRMACK. Eight days later.

Mr. Vinson. It Is headed, "We thank you." The body of the editorial reads as follows:

"WE THANK YOU

"We Kcntuckians In the mountains are grateful to you Kentuckians of the lowlands. You heard our cries of distress and sorrow after our beloved Kentucky River had changed from a limpid, sullen stream and transformed into a raging torrent of might and destruction almost in the twinkling of an eye. The hundred cries of frightened children, the pathetic moans of frantic women, the apprehensive words of anxious men, reached your ears almost as soon as the murky waters receded and left a filthy offering of mud and slime.

"We did not ask for help and you gave it; you gave It. You soothed our sorrows with your sympathy; you matched our every tear with a dollar; you forever dispelled the Idea of a Kentucky of four parts with a spontaneous balm of helpfulness and sympathetic interest.

"We are a grateful people ami we do not forget; we may be d >wn now but we will pull out. We will stay on our road of progress, however difficult and tortuous the way mny seem for a little while.

"We are bearing our burdens as only Kentuckians can. You nre making our burdens lighter as only Kentuckians can. We arc offering our thanks In that same spirit and know that you will accept and understand."

This is a condition that confronts us. In the language of this editorial, emanating from the heart of the Kentucky mountains, we say to this committee, and wo will say to the Congress of the United State*, when yon heed our cry and answer our call, "We thank yon." [Applause.]

AN ACT OF GRACE

Some question has been raised relative to this legislation being bottomed upon a legal basis. I have never attempted to deceive anyone, let alone myself, as to the basis of this appropriation. It is a gratuity, an act of grace. An unprecedented calamity befell a portion of this country and, as ever, the Federal Government responded to the call for help. I submit that it is not a precedent on the part of the Federal Government in the contribution of public moneys to relieve the distressed condition of its people. This is a precedent only in respect to the manner in which the money is to be expended.

It is a precedent for Kentucky—99 lives lost, 401 bridges destroyed, 2,481 miles of road destroyed, $56,000,000 worth of property destroyed; a large section of the State unable to replace the bridges constructed over a period of 50 years'; it is the first time that Kentucky has called for help. In so doing her Representatives do not feel that it is charity. An area of 9,000 square miles felt the destroying touch of this unprecedented catastrophe; a half million people live within that area, with homes destroyed, with farms washed away, with the children unable to attend church or school when it be situate on the other side of the mountain stream. As a Representative of nine counties in the flooded area I feel no shame in asking your consideration of this plea for help. The State Legislature of Kentucky has appropriated funds to match dollar for dollar the Federal appropriation. The appropriation is without legislative authority except in so far as your action authorizes it, but it is not a charity. It is justice to a deserving people.

The quality of mercy Ie not strained;

It droppoth as the gentle rain from heaven.

Mr. WARREN. I assume the States involved will accept it in any way they get it, but my reason for voting to report the bill favorably from the committee was that it is a duty of the Federal Government to replace these roads that have been destroyed by disasters.

Now, commenting on the remarks made by the gentleman from Oklahoma [Mr. Hastings], I wish to say that at the very beginning of this session a general bill was introduced to take care of this situation and to set up an emergency fund of $10,000,000 always to be available to replace Federal-aid roads and bridges that might be destroyed by a disaster in any State. This bill has been indorsed by the bureau and by the State highway commissions of 86 States. A hearing at one time was ordered on it and then suddenly called off, and the only conclusion that I could arrive at as to why it was called off was that it was becoming too popular and they did not want a member of the minority to have a bill of this kind reported out that would be adopted by the House if it ever came to a vote.

The SPEAKER. The question is on the motion of the gentleman from Iowa.

The motion was agreed to.

The SPEAKER. The Clerk will report the next amendment in disagreement.

The Clerk read as follows:

Amendment 100: Pnge 82, after line 7, insert the following:

"FLOOD REUEF, KENTUCKY

"For the relief of the State of Kentucky, to restore and recondition the roads and bridges damaged or destroyed by the floods In said State in the year of 1927, the sum of $1,889,994: Provided, That any sums hereby appropriated shall be expended under the supervision and direction of the Department of Agriculture and Bureau of Public Roads in cooperation with the State Highway Department of the State of Kentucky: Provided further, That the amount herein appropriated shall be available when the State of Kentucky shall make available a like sum, which shall be expended to restore and recondition said roads and bridges: Provided further, That not more than $3,000 per mile on any road and not more than $15,000 on any bridge shall be expended out of the funds hereby appropriated: Provided furtlicr, That no part of the sum herein appropriated shall be expended for rights of way, or damages of any kind or character, or for engineering fees Incurred by the State of Kentucky, or any division thereof, or for the restoration of any road, street, or highway within any Incorporated town or city."

Mr. DICKINSON of Iowa. Mr. Speaker, I move that the House further insist on Its disagreement.

The motion was agreed to.

The SPEAKER. The Clerk will report the next amendment in disagreement.

The Clerk read as follows:

Amendment 102: Page 83, line 15, strike out $132,488,849.88 and insert "$139,409,738.88."

Mr. DICKINSON of Iowa. Mr. Speaker, I move that the House recede and concur with an amendment as follows:

The Clerk read as follows:

Mr. Dickinson of Iowa moves that the House recede from Its disagreement to the amendment of the Senate No. 102, and agree to the same with an amendment an follows: In lieu of the sum inserted by said amendment insert "$139,138,793.88."

Mr. DICKINSON of Iowa. Mr. Speaker, there seems to be some misunderstanding as to the House insisting on its disagreement to amendment 100. I want to say that that is the Kentucky item, and it is included in amendment. 99, which also provides for Vermont and New Hampshire. The Senate will recede from the Kentucky amendment and accept ours.

Mr. KINCHELOE. Amendment No. 99 has still to be adopted by the Senate?

Mr. DICKINSON of Iowa. Yes; it has to be agreed to by the Senate.

Mr. KINCHELOE. It will not have to be further agreed to by the Senate conferees?

Mr. DICKINSON of Iowa. No.

The SPEAKER. The question is on the motion of the gentleman from Iowa to recede and concur with an amendment.

The motion was agreed to.

Mr. DICKINSON of Iowa. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous eonsout to extend my remarks by including a statement with reference to the various items in this bill, giving complete data as to the different items in the bill.

The SPEAKER. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from Iowa?

There was no objection.

The matter referred to is as follows:

AC.RICVLTUBAL APPROPRIATION BILL

Statement of Senate amendment* inralting appropriation*, rhoir'uif amount! appropriated by the House and Senate, reipectieels, the amount finally agreed upon, together with the

increases over the Houte figure or the reductions under the Senate figure

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AGRICULTURAL APPROPRIATION BILL—Continued

Statement of Senate amendments involving appropriations, snowing amounts appropriated by the House and Senate, rerpettlcely, the amount finally agreed upon, together with On

increases over Ike House figure or the reductions under the Senate figure

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CHRISTINE BRENZINGER

Mr. LEAVITT. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent to take from the Speaker's table the bill H. It. 0297, for I he relief of Christine Brenzinger, with a Senate amendment, and agree to the Senate amendment.

The SPEAKER. The gentleman from Montana asks unanimous consent to take from the Speaker's table the bill H. R. 5297 and agree to the Senate amendment.

The Senate amendment was read and agreed to.

8H08HONE INUIANB

Mr. LEAVITT. Mr. Speaker, I present a conference report on the bill S. 710 for printing in the Record under the rule.

POST OFFICE AT PHILIPPI, W. VA.

Mr. ELLIOTT. Mr. Speaker, I nsk unanimous consent to take from the Speaker's table the bill (H. R. 10799) for the lease of land and the erection of .a post office at Philippi, W. Va., and for other purposes, with Senate amendments, and agree to the same.

The SPEAKER. The gentleman from Indiana asks unanimous consent to take from the Speaker's table the bill (H. R. 10799) and agree to the Senate amendment. Is there objection?

There was no objection.

The Senate amendment was read.

The Senate amendment was agreed to.

LEGISLATIVE APPROPRIATION DILI,

Mr. MURPHY. Mr. Speaker, I cull tip the conference report on the bill H. R. 12875, the legislative appropriation bill, and ask unanimous consent that the statement be read in lieu of the report.

The SPEAKER. The gentleman from Ohio calls up the conference rei>ort on the legislative appropriation bill, and asks unanimous consent that the statement be read in lieu of the reix>rt. Is there objection?

There was no object! '>n.

The Clerk read the statement

The conference report and statement are as follows:

CONFERENCE REPORT

The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amendments of the Senate to the bill (H. R. 12875) making appropriations for the legislative branch of the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1929, and for other purposes, having met, after full and free conference have agreed to recommend and do recommend to their respective Houses as follows:

That the Senate recede from its amendments numbered 39 and 45.

That the House recede from its disagreement to the amendments of the Senate numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 30, 37, 38, 40, 41, and 44, and agree to the same.

The committee of conference have not agreed on amendments numbered 42, 43, and 46.

Frank Murphy,
Geo. A. Welsh,
Wm. P. Holaday,
John N. Sandlin,
Edward T. Taylor,
Managers on the part of the House.
F. E. Warren,
Reed Smoot,
Charles Curtis,
B. 8. Broussard,
Royal S. Copeland,
Managers on the part of the Senate.

STATEMENT

The managers on the part of the House at the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amendments of the Senate to the bill (H. H. 12875) making appropriations for the legislative branch of the Government for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1929, and for other purposes, submit the following statement in explanation of the effect of the action agreed upon by the conference committee and embodied in the accompanying conference report, as to each of such amendments, namely:

On amendments Nos. 1 to 33, inclusive: Inserts figures, ns proposed by the Senate, making salary increases for certain employees in the Senate in the offices of the Vice President, Secretary, certain committee clerks, post office, and the folding room.

On Nos. 34 to 38, inclusive: Inserts figures, as proposed by the Senate, allowing increases in certain Senate contingent expense items.

On No. 39: Strikes out the language, as proposed by the Senate, allowing reimbursement for expenses of travel of certain clerks.

On Nos. 40 and 41: Inserts figures, as proposed by the Senate, allowing a salary increase for the Architect of the CapitoL

On No. 44: Inserts figures, as proposed by the Senate, allowing an increase of $2,000 in the fund for maintenance, Senate Office Building, for the purpose of repairing the roof.

On No. 45: Strikes out the language, as proposed by the Senate, relative to the compensation rates for employees on leave In the Government Printing Office.

The committee of conference have not agreed to the following amendments:

On No. 42: Transferring an amendment, as proposed by the Senate, with reference to the submission of bids to the Architect of the Capitol In connection with the appropriation for improving the ventilating system of the Senate Chamber and the Hall of the House of Representatives to the appropriation as inserted by the Senate for rearranging and reconstructing the Senate wing of the Capitol.

On No. 43: Inserting language, as provided by the Senate, obviating sections 3709 and 3744 of the Revised Statutes, having to do with the submission and acceptance of bids with reference to the appropriation for improving the ventilating system of the Senate Chamber and the Hall of the House of Representatives.

Ou No. 46: Inserting language, as proposed by the Senate, making applicable to the Government Printing Office section 91, chapter 5, title 20, of the Code of Laws of the United States, permitting the employment of individuals for scientific purposes.

Frank Murphy,
Geo. A. Welsh,

WM. P. HOLADAY,

John N. Sandlin,
Edward T. Taylor,
If onagers on the part of the House.

Mr. MURPHY. Mr. Speaker, I move the adoption of the conference report.

The conference report was agreed to.

The SPEAKER. The Clerk will report the first amendment In disagreement.

The Clerk read as follows:

Amendment No. 42: Page 25, line 1, Insert: "Senate wing reconstruction: To rearrange and reconstruct the Senate wing of the Capitol in accordance with the report of the Architect of the Capitol contained In Senate Document No. 161, Sixty-eighth Congress, second session, with such alterations as the Senate Committee on Rules may from time to time approve, to be Immediately available, and to remain available until June 30, 1930, $500,000, to be expended by the Architect of the Capitol, under the direction and supervision of the Bald Committee on Rules."

Mr. MURPHY. Mr. Speaker, I move that the House recede and concur in the Senate amendment with an amendment which I send to the desk and ask to have read.

The Clerk read as follows:

Mr. Mdrphy moves that the House recede from its disagreement to the amendment of Senate No. 42, and agree to the game with an amendment, as follows: After the word "Rules," on page 25, line 9, Insert the following: ", without compliance with sections 8709 and 3744 of the Revised Statutes of the United States: Provided, That the Architect of the Capitol Is authorized, within the appropriation herein made, to enter Into such contracts In the market, to make such expenditures (including expenditures for furniture, material, supplies, equipment, accessories, advertising, travel, and subsistence), and to employ such professional and other assistants without regard to the provisions of section 35 of the public buildings omnibus act, approved Jnne 28, 1910, as amended, as may be approved by such committee."

The SPEAKER. The question is on agreeing to the motion of the gentleman from Ohio.

The motion was agreed to.

The SPEAKER, The Clerk will report the next amendment in disagreement.

The Clerk read as follows:

Amendment No. 43: Page 25, line 24, after the word "Capitol," insert: "Without compliance with sections 8709 and 3744 of the Revised Statutes of the United States: Provided, That in carrying out the reconstruction and ventilation of the Senate Chamber and House of Representatives, the Architect of the Capitol is authorized, within the appropriation herein made, to enter into such contracts In the open market, to make such expenditures (including expenditures for furniture, material, supplies, equipment, accessories, advertising, travel, and subsistence), and to employ such professional and other assistants without regard to the provisions of section 35 of the public buildings omnibus act, approved June 25, 1910, as amended, as may be approved by such committee."

Mr. MURPHY. Mr. Speaker, I move to recede and concur in the Senate amendment with the following amendment, which I send to the desk and ask to have read.

The Clerk read as follows:

Mr. Mcrphy moves that the House recede from its disagreement to the amendment of the Senate No. 43 and agree to the same with an

amendment, as follows: In lieu of the language as proposed by the Senate Insert the following: "Without compliance with sections 3709 and 3744 of the Revised Statutes of the United States."

Mr. MAcGREGOR. Mr. Speaker, will the gentleman yield?

Mr. MURPHY. Yes.

Mr. MAcGREGOR. Mr. Speaker, it seems to me that the adoption of this amendment leaves the situation somewhat inconsistent. If the Senate is going to move their Chamber out to the wall, will we not have to do it on this side of the Capitol in the same way? [Applause.] There is an item In the bill of $300,000 for putting more air in here, I suppose also to take out some of the hot air, but this expenditure of $500,000 on the part of the Senate in moving its Chamber to the wall, it seems to me will destroy the architectural effect of the Capitol.

Mr. LAGUARDIA. But it can not be seen on the outside.

Mr. CLARKE. The gentleman will admit that there is a difference in the air in the Senate Chamber and the air In this Chamber?

Mr. MAcGREGOR. Yes; I admit that the air here is somewhat better.

Mr. MURPHY. Mr. Speaker, the remarks made by the gentleman from New York [Mr. Macg&bqor] do not need any reply. He is voicing an opinion, which he has a perfect right to give. I have no explanation to make further than to say that If the Members of the Senate seek to improve conditions and by improving those conditions hope to prolong the life of those who are now Members of that body, it would certainly be very bad taste upon the part of the Members of the House not to allow them to do so.

Mr. NEWTON. Does the gentleman think that this amendment will improve conditions at the other end of the Capitol?

Mr. MURPHY. It is hoped so, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. SNELL. By better air or better what?

Mr. MURPHY. Better everything.

The SPEAKER. The question is on agreeing to the motion of the gentleman from Ohio.

The motion was agreed to.

The SPEAKER. The Clerk will report the next amendment in disagreement.

The Clerk read as follows:

Amendment No. 40: Page 33, after line 14, insert: "Section 91, chapter 5, title 20, of the Code of Laws of the United States is hereby amended so as to Include and apply to the Government Printing Office."

Mr. MURPHY. Mr. Speaker, I move that the House recede and concur in the Senate amendment The motion was agreed to.

COORDINATION OF PUBLIC-HEALTH ACTIVITIES

Mr. MAPES. Mr. Speaker, I call up the conference report upon the bill (H. R. 11026) to provide for the coordination of the public-health activities of the Government, and for other purposes, and ask unanimous consent that the statements be read in lieu of the report

The SPEAKER. The gentleman from Michigan calls up a conference report and asks unanimous consent that the statement be read in lieu of the report.

Is there objection?

There was no objection.

The SPEAKER. The Clerk will read the statement.

The Clerk read the statement.

The conference report and statement are as follows:

CONFERENCE REPORT

The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the amendments of the Senate to the bill (H. R. 11026) to provide for the coordination of the public-health activities of the Government, and for other purposes, having met, after full and free conference have agreed to recommend and do recommend to their respective Houses as follows:

That the Senate recede from its amendment numbered 14.

That the Hou.se recede from its disagreement to the amendments of the Senate numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21, and agree to the same.

Amendment numbered 15: That the House recede from its disagreement to the amendment of the Senate numbered 15, and agree to the same with an amendment as follows: In lieu of the matter proposed to be inserted by said amendment insert the following: "Provided, That the term of service of the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service shall be for four years: And provided further. That no person who has served for a period of eight years either before or after the passage of this act shall be eligible for reappointment as Surgeon General";

and the Senate agree to the same.

James S. Parker,
Carl E. Mapes,
Clarence F. Lea,

Managers on the part of the House.
W. L. Jones,
Chas L. McNABT,
Duncan U. Fletcher,
Managers on the part vf the Senate.

STATEMENT

The managers on the part of the House at the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the bill (II. R. 11026) to provide for the coordination of the public-health activities, and for other purposes, submit the following statement in explanation of the effect of the action agreed upon and embodied in the accompanying conference report as to each of such amendments, namely:

On amendments of the Senate Nos. 1 to 13 and Nos. 16 to 21, inclusive, are either formal or clarifying amendments or amendments limiting or making more specific some of the provisions of the House bill. They do not affect the general purpose of the legislation and for the most part are in accord with it, some of them being already covered by the regulations of the Public Health Service.

On amendment No. 14, from which the Senate recedes, struck out the provision of the House bill permitting the appointment of the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service from outside of the service in the discretion of the President. The conferees are of the opinion that the President should not be confined to the service in making his selection for this important position but should be i>ermitted, in his discretion, to select anyone specially qualified for the position.

On amendment No. 15: The House recedes from its disagreement to Senate amendment No. 15 and agrees to the same with an amendment. The conferees agree to the amendment fixing tlie term of the Surgeon General to four years and providing that no person shall be eligible for reappointment who has served as Surgeon General for a period of eight years. This will not affect tin- present term of the present Surgeon General but will apply hereafter. The conferees struck out the language in the amendment which seemed to contemplate that the Surgeon General might be relieved before the completion of the term for which lie might l>e appointed.

James S. Parker, Carl E. Mapes, Clarence F. Lea, Managers on the part of the House.

The SPEAKER. The question is on agreeing to the conference report. The conference report was agreed to.

RETIKEMKNT OP EMERGENCY OFFICERS

Mr. SNELL. Mr. Speaker, I present a privileged report from the Committee on Rulew, which I send to the desk and ask to have read.

The Clerk read as follows:

House Resolution 188

Resolved, That upon the adoption of this resolution it shall be in order to move that the House resolve itself into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Uniou for the consideration of S. 777, :in act making eligible for retirement, under certain conditions, officers and former officers of the Army, Navy, and Marine Corps of the United States, other than officers of the Regular Army, Navy, or Marine Corps, who incurred physical disability In line of duty while in the service of the United States during the World War. That after general debate, which shall be confined to the bill and shall continue not to exceed live hours, to be equally divided and controlled by those favoring nnd opposing the bill, the hill shall he read for amendment under the tlve-ininute rule. At the conclusion of the reading of the bill for amendment the committee shall rise and report the bill to the House with 8nch amendments as .may have been adopted, and the previous question shall Ik* considered as ordered on the bill and the amendments thereto to iinal passage without intervening motion except one motion to recommit.

Mr. SNKLL. Mr. Speaker, this resolution makes provisions for the consideration of the Tyson-Fitzgerald bill for the retirement of emergency officers of the late war. I do not think the hill needs any introduction by me to the Members of this House or to the American people. The bill is controversial. For that reason the rule provides for five hours of general debate. Some of those who have been most interested.in advancing legislation for the soldiers of the late war are opposed to this bill. They

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desire to have full discussion of It On account of the long time for general debate, I do not intend to take any more time at present in the discussion of the rule, but yield 10 minute* (o the gentleman from North Carolina [Mr. Pou].

Mr. RANKIN. Mr. Speaker, I think the membership of the House ought to be here to hear this argument on the rule. I make the point of order that there is no quorum present.

The SPEAKER. Evidently there is no quorum present

Mr. SNELL. Mr. Siteaker, I move a call of the House.

The motion was agreed to.

The SPEAKER. The Doorkeeper will close the doors, the Sergeant nt Arms will bring in absent Members, and the Clerk will call the roll.

The Clerk called the roll, and the following Members failed to answer to their names:

[Roll No. 761

Aldrich Cooper, Ohio Langley Tatgenhorst

Anthony Crnmton Larseu Taylor, Tefln.

Auf der Hcide Curry Liiithlaim Thompson

Beck, Pa. Davenport Lozler Tillniau

Bogg Uavey Lyon Treadway

BeJl Domp-sey Morin Tucker

Black, Tex.
Blanton
Bloom
Boloa
Bowling
Brand. <!a.
Brlgham
Britten
Bulwinkle
Burdlck
Burton
Busby
Butler
Caiifield
Carley
Carter
Casey
rolling
Connally, Tex.

The SPEAKER. Three hundred and twenty-nine Members are present, a quorum.

Mr. SNKLL. Mr. Speaker, I move to dispense with further proceedings under the call.

The SPEAKER. The gentleman from New York moves to dispense with further proceedings under the call. The question is on agreeing to that motion.

The motion was agreed to.

Mr. SNELL. Mr. Speaker, I yield 10 minutes to the gentleman from North Carolina [Mr. Pou].

The SPEAKER. The gentleman from North Carolina is recognized for 10 minutes.

Mr. POU. Mr. Speaker, I am so earnestly in favor of the Tyson-Fitzgerald bill that I do not feel like consuming the time of the House, and I shall only do so for a very few moments.

In the first place, we should bear in mind that we are dealing with wounded officers, about 3,000 in number. The bill concerns not. of course, all of the men who were drafted into the service, but it provides for the retirement only of the wounded emergency officers of the World War.

Objection is made because the bill does not provide equal treatment for all who were drafted from civil life. This objection could be made to the pay these men received during the war. Some were officers, others could not be officers. The salary of the officers always has been and probably always will he larger than the pay of the enlisted men.

I believe the enlisted man wishes his officer from civil life— that is, the wounded officer—treated exactly as the officer of the same grade from the Regular Army is treated. I do not admit that there is any precedent which ought now to govern America in dealing with the men who saved the civilization of the world. [Applause.] The World War has no precedent or parallel in the history of mankind, and, for my part. I shall not be governed by precedent in dealing with the men who were drafted into the service. It will be difficult for America to discharge the debt of gratitude she owes to these men, no matter what she does. I have l>een told that amendments would be offered to this bill for the purpose of killing it. I believe an overwhelming majority of this House favors this legislation. For one, as n friend of the bill, I shall vote against all such amendments. [Applause.]

Mr. Speaker, I think no mistake will ho made in putting the wounded officers from civil life on an equality with the wounded officers of the Regular Army. It is easily conceivable how the officer from civil life may have made even greater sacrifice for his country than the officer of the Regular Army. This hill treat* them all equally. There should be no partiality shown to either class.

Of course, all who saw service offered their all for their country; but it is also true that the. officers and soldiers of

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