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solved by a contract authorized by law whereby a Government-owned corporation contracts with the producers of basic commodities to help them stabilize their prices at a fair minimum upon condition that the farmers contract with each other and with the corporation to make such curtailment of production and sale as may lie necessary not to depress the market at any time. Once this control of production and marketing is established, a reasonable price for the commodity will be assured. The Government will have kept its part of the covenant without any loss. As the night follows the day, so will the control of prices within reasonable limits follow control of production and marketing.

Many of my radio audience, I am sure, arc wondering whether or not tliis "consummation devoutly to be wished" can In fact be accomplished. Let me say that I have introduced a bill (H. K. 77) embodying my conception of a plan to enable the producers to control their production and marketing programs and thus name within reason for the first time the prices at which they will sell the products of their own toil.

Let me tell you briefly about this bill and how it will establish an efficient surplus control. The bill is patterned after the War Finance Corporation act, the first sections being identical with that act except that the bill proposes to create the fanners' finance corporation rather than tile War Finance Corporation. Tills corporation is to be authorized to make loans through the banks of the Nation, much the same as the War Finance Corporation, directly to the producers of basic agricultural commodities. The loans are to bear 4 per cent Interest, be made for the full amount of the average price of the commodity for the last 10 years, with the commodity as the sole and only collateral and without any right on the part of the farmers' finance corporation to enllect any amount of the loan not repaid by the sale of the commodity. Thus the farmer will in effect be receiving as a part of the sale price of his commodity an amount equal to the average price for which he usually sells the commodity, thereby establishing the average price of the commodity as the minimum price of the same.

Now, in my mind's eye 1 can see hands held up all over the Nation for permission to ask what would become of the assets of the corporation loaning 25 cents per pound on cotton if cotton should at the same time.1 bo selling for, say, in cents per pound or even less? Well, 1 will admit that the proposition would be absurd if there were no further provisions In the bill for the protection of the Uovernment's corporation. It takes two to make a contract and no one could expect a Governmentowned corporation to be required by Congress to render so great a benefit to the farmers without them agreeing to do something on their part to make the corporation secure in the loans made. There should be and must be a mutability of contract, with a good and sufficient consideration flowing and lo flow between the farmers, the banks through which they are to get their loans, and the farmers' finance corporation.

Therefore, the bill provides that before any of the loans mentioned are made farmers planting 75 per cent of the acreage of cotton, for instance, grown in the United States shall have signed and abided by contracts with each other, with [heir banks, and with the corporation, agreeing and obligating themselves that the cotton advisory council be authorized to control within reasonable limits the acreage planted so ns to hold production within reasonable bounds and that the farmer will not sell any of the particular basic commodity without express authority from the advisory council. Briefly stated, by my plan Congress wnuld simply propose to the fanners that if they would by mutual contracts control their production and marketing, then the farmers' finance corporation would by loans enable the farmers to name within reason the selling price of the products of their own toil.

The banks would receive a reasonable compensation for handling the transaction, but would not become liable as Indorser or surety. The duties of the directors of the corporation are plainly specified In the bill. The advisory council of the commodity to be handled has Jurisdiction of discretionary matters and issues most vital to the farmers, and lire to be selected by the governors of the commodity-producing States until the farmers are sufficiently organized, and then to be selected by the farmers themselves. This is clearly constitutional, ns members of the advisory council under this bill would not be Federal officials, but only officials recognized by contract much as State highway officials are now recognized by the Federal Government in its present highway 00—50 plan or program. This plan would leave the friends of the farmer in full control of his affairs, would enable the farmers to borrow If they wished the fair price of their commodity, to be repaid only when the commodity was sold, and then only out of the proceeds of the sale.

The farmer would be required to hold his product off the market until tt could be sold for enough to repay the loan, all charges such ag storage, insurance, interest, etc., and such an additional amount to the fanner as would remain from the sale of the commodity at a fair price. The farmer would be able to bold his product, for he could borrow at a very low rate of Interest the reasonable value of his prcduct. The farmer would contract to curtail his production, providing his friends decided it best for him to do so, on condition that all farmers make a similar reduction and provided he received more for the lesser amount produced than he would if he produced without limit.

My bill provides simply that the Government make an offer to the farmers to help them solve their great farm problem, provided the farmers would contract to control the great overproduction and surplus menace.

It will be observed that the plan proposed by this bill would not become operative unless those planning 75 per cent of a basic commodity expressed such a desire by signing the proposed contract for surplus control. It is provided that 85 per cent of such planters mast sign by the end of flint year of operations, 95 per cent by the end of second year, and 97 per cent by the end of third year. The bill, therefore, contains a most splendid referendum. It does not go Into effect or remain in effect unless an overwhelming majority of the farmers Bo declare. The bill would not in the least force the farmers to adopt a plan or policy not desired by them. It offers, to my mind, the bnt inducement ever proposed for organization by the farmers.

All other farm relief bills are either silent as to the all important factor of production control, or seek through penalties or other equally vicious methods, to control production. This plan seeks to control production and marketing by the voluntary act of the farmer, entered into as a part and parcel of the farm-relief scheme itself. All other bills dodge to a great extent this vital feature of surplus-production control. My bill recognizes this as the heart of the farm-relief plan and deals with it In a way that must be effective If operation is secured under the scheme. There can be no effective farm relief without effective production and marketing control. I repeat what I have said before:

Just as surely as we elevate prices without some sort of control of production, Just so surely will the farmers themselves plant more corn and more cotton and more wheat and produce more and bring about the greater production. In other words, any bill which fails to have within It a proper control of production has failure written on its pnges.

Under my bill there will be no need for any equalization fee, for the farmers would control the surplus problem effectively, as all farmers could hold their commodity and share in the high price without assuming an unfair burden. The bill lias the most effective nonpremlum insurance plan ever written. It would stop gambling. The farmers within reasonable limits would name their own prices.

The Government could not lose. There would lie no subsidy. The debenture plan would provide indirect, doubtful relief. Tills plan would afford direct, certain relief. The plan Is clear and definite and seeks to set up efficient, economically sound farm relief under the constitutional right of contract.

In conclusion let me say that, in my humble Judgment, my bill would put the control of the farmer's great problems in the bands of bta friends, nut his enemies: would help the farmer directly and not indirectly; provide a complete solution of the overproduction problem; would enable the f:irincr within reasonable bounds to name bis own price for his commodity; and would put him for the first time on a parity with other enterprises and Industries.

Ladles and gentlemen of the radio audience, I thank you. Good night.

RETORT OF THE AIJEN PROPERTY CUSTODIAN (II. DOC. NO. 302)

The SPEAKER laid before the House the following message from the President of the United States, which was reatl, and, with accompanying papers, was referred to the ('ommittee on Interstate and Foreign ('onimeree and ordered to be printed: To the Coiiffrenn of the I'nitfd Xtatfs:

In aecordmice with the requirements of section 6 of the trading with the enemy act, I transmit herewith for the information of the Congress, the annual report of the Alien Properly Custodian on proceedings had under the trading with the enemy act for the year ended December 31, 1927.

Calvin Coolidge.

The White Housir, May H, 1928.

SENATE BILLS REFERRED

Bills of the following titles were taken from the Speaker's table and, under the rule, referred to the appropriate committees, as follows:

S. 382. An act for the relief of Joseph F. Thorpe; to the Committee on Claims.

S. 4<jO. An net for the relief of the owners of the barge Mary 31; to the Committee on War Claims.

S. 3050. An net for the relief of the estate of Moses M. Bone; to the Committee on Claims.

S. 3845. An act to prohibit predictions with respect to cotton prices in any report, bulletin, or other publication issued hy any department or other establishment in the executive branch of the Government ; to the Committee on Agriculture.

S. 3944. An net autliorizing the President to present in the name of Congress gold medals of appropriate design to Clarence I>. Chainberlin and Charles A. l,evine; to the Committee on Coinage, Weights, and Measures.

S. 39i>l. An act declaring certain designated purposes with respect to certain parts of Santa Uosa Island in Florida to If "public purposes" within the meaning of tbe proviso in section 7 of (he act approved March 12, 1926, entitled "An act authorizing tlie use for permanent construction sit military posts of the proceeds from the sale of surplus War Department real property, and authorizing the sale of certain military reservations, ami for other purposes "; to the Committee on Military Affairs.

S. 4124. An act to provide for notice to owners of land assessed for benefits by the verdict of condemnation juries in the District of Columbia, and for other purposes; to the Committee on the District of Columbia.

S.4229. An act to extend the time for completing the construction of a bridge across the Mississippi River near and above the city of New Orleans. La.: to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

S. 4276. An act granting a pension to Edith Boiling Wilson; to the Committee on Pensions.

S. 4321. An act authorising the Secretary of the Interior to dispose of two bridges on the San Carlos Indian Keservation. in Arizona, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Indian Affairs.

ENROLLED BILLS SIGNED

Mr. CAMPBELL, from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported that they had examined and found truly enrolled bills uf the following titles, when the Speaker signed the same:

II. K. 126. An act to add certain lands to the Missoulu National Forest, Mont.; and

II. R. 8105. An act to provide for the membership of the Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy, and for other purposes.

The SPEAKER announced his signature to an enrolled bill of the Sennte of the following title:

S. 777. An act making eligible for retirement, under certain conditions, officers and former officers of the Army, Navy, and Marine Corps of the Vuited States, other than officers of the Regular Army. Navy, or Marine Corps, who incurred physical disability in line of duty while in the service of the United States during the World War.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

By unanimous consent, the following leave of absence was granted:

To Mr. Gibson, for one week, on account of business;

To Mr. Maas, for the balance of the week, on account of important business;

To Mr. Wurzbach, for 14 days, on account of important business; and

To Mr. Waikwrioht, indefinitely, on account of important business.

ADJOURNMENT

Mr. KOPP. Mr. Speaker, I move that the House do now adjourn.

The motion was agreed to: accordingly (at 5 o'clock and 36 minutes p. in.) the House adjourned until to-morrow, Tuesday. May 15, 1928. at 12 o'clock noon.

COMMITTEE HEARINGS

Mr. TILSON submitted the following tentative list of committee hearings scheduled for Tuesday, May 15. 1928, as reported to the floor leader by clerks of the several committees:

COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE

(10 a. m.)

To amend the United States grain standards act by inserting a new section providing for licensing and establishing laboratories for making determinations of protein in wheat and oil in flax (H. K. 106).

COMMITTEE ON NAVAL AFFAIRS

(10.30 a. m.)

To authorize the Secretary of the Navy to proceed with the construction of certain public works (II. K. 18319).

COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIKB

(10.30 a. in.)

To ascertain if the State Department is adequately equipped in both its foreign and domestic services (H. lies. 87).

To provide for the reorganization of the Department of State (II. H. 13179).

COMMITTEE ON HASHING AND CURRENCY

(10.30 a. m.)

To amend the act approved December 23. 1913, known as the Federal reserve act; to define certain policies toward which the l«owers of the Federal reserve system shall be directed; to further promote the maintenance of a stable gold standard; to promote tlie stability of commerce, iniluslry, agriculture, and

employment; to-assist in realizing a more stable purchasing power of the dollar (II. H. 11806).

COMMITTEE O.N THE DISTRICT OP COLUMBIA SUBCOMMITTEE ON TUB

JUDICIARY

(10.30 a. 111.) For the relief of Jennie Bruce Gallihan (H. R. &388).

COMMITTEK ON RIVERS AND HARBORS

(10.30 a. m.)

To authorize tlie establishment of a national hydraulic laboratory in the Bureau of Standards of the Department of Commerce and the construction of a building therefor (S. 1710).

COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY SUBCOMMITTEE NO. 1

(10 a. in.)

Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States (H. J. Kcs. 277).

EXECUTIVE COMMUNICATIONS. ETC. Under clause 2 of Rule XXIV. executive communications were taken from the Speaker's table and referred as follows:

523. A letter from the Secretary of the Interior, transmitting report from the several departments engaged in law-enforcement activities of the Federal Government in Alaska, concerning the titles, salaries paid, and expenditures for police and law-enforcement officers with a view to eliminating duplication of work and unnecessary expense; to the Committee on Territories.

524. A communication from the President of the United States, transmitting draft of proposed legislation affecting the appropriation for roads and trails, national parks, contained in the Interior Department appropriations for the fiscal year (H. Doc. No. 297); to the Committee on Appropriations and ordered to be printed.

525. A communication from the President of the United States, transmitting supplemental estimates of appropriations for the Department of State for the fiscal years 1928 and 1929 amounting to $250,448.15, together with a draft of proposed legislation affecting an existing appropriation (H. Doc. No. 298); to the Committee on Appropriations and ordered to be printed.

526. A communication from the President of the United States, transmitting draft of proposed legislation affecting an existing appropriation for the District of Columbia, for the fiscal year 1928, with respect to the acquisition of a site in the vicinity of the Dunbar High School for drill, athletic, and playground purposes (H. Doc. No. 299) ; to the Committee on Appropriations and ordered to bt1 printed.

527. A communication from the President of the United States, transmitting supplemental estimate of appropriations for the Navy Department for the fiscal year ending June 30. 1929, for $785.437 (H. Doc. No. 300) ; t<> the Committee on Appropriations and ordered to be printed.

528. A communication from the President of the United States, transmitting draft of proposed legislation to make available from the appropriation for salaries and exi>enses. 1928. for the Bureau of Efficiency, the sum of $1,092.33 for payment of certain contract work to secure data in relation to retirement plans for teachers in the District of Columbia and the civil-service retirement and disability fund (H. Doc. No. 301) : to the Committee on Appropriations and ordered to be printed.

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PUBLIC BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

Under clause 2 of Rule XIII,

Mr. GRAHAM: Committee on the Judiciary. II. R. 13C45. A bill to establish two United States narcotic farms for the confinement and treatment of persons addicted to the use of habitforming narcotic drugs who have been convicted of offenses against the United States, and for other purposes; without amendment (Rept. No. 1652). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.

Mr. LKAVITT: Committee on Indian Affairs. II. R. 13506. A bill fixing the salary of tlie Commissioner of Indian Affairs and the Assistant Commissioner of Indian Affairs; with amendment (Rept. No. 1653). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.

Mr. LEAV1TT: Committee on Indian Affairs. II. R. 13711. A bill to amend section 4 of an act entitled" "An act to extend the period of restrictions in lands of certain members of the Five Civilized Tribes, and for other purposes"; with amendment (Rept. No. 1(>51). Referred to the House Calendar.

Mr. ZIHLMAN: Committee on the District of Columbia. S. 4124. An act to provide for notice to owners of land assessed for benefits by the verdict of condemnation Juries in the District of Columbia, and for other purposes; without amendment (Kept. No. 1657). Referred to the House Calendar.

Mr. MERRITT: Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce. H. R. 13708. A bill to authorize the Secretary of Commerce to dispose of a certain lighthouse reservation and to acquire certain land for lighthouse purposes; without amendment (Rept. No. 1662). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PRIVATE BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

Under clause 2 of Rute XIII,

Mr. IRWIN: Committee on Claims. H. R. 10191. A bill for the relief of G. J. Bell; with amendment (Rept. No. 1650). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House.

Mr. UNDERBILL: Committee on Claims. S. 471. An act for tho relief of Agnes McManus and George J. McManus; with amendment (Rept. No. 1651). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House.

Mr. HOWARD of Oklahoma: Committee on Indian Affairs. S. 2076. An act authorizing the enrollment of Carl J. Reid DuNKome as a Kiowa Indian, and directing issuance of trust patents to him to certain lands of the Kiowa Indian Reservation, Okla.; without amendment (Rept. No. 1655). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House.

Mr. ARENTZ: Committee on Indian Affairs. S. 2738. An act for the relief of C. II. Olberg; without amendment (Rept. No. 1656). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House.

Mr. WAINWRIGHT: Committee on Military Affairs. II. R. 7887. A hill placing Cadet Adrian Van Leeuwen on the retired list; without amendment (Rept. No. 1658). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House.

Mr. WARE: Committee on Claims. H. R. 12499. A bill for the relief of Arthur N. Ashmore; with amendment (Rept. No. 1659). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House.

Mr. UNDERBILL: Committee on Claims. H. R. 5216. A hill for the relief of the New York Marine Co.; with amendment (Rept. No. 1660). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House.

CHANGE OF REFERENCE

Under clause 2 of Rule XXII, committees were discharged from the consideration of the following bills, which were referred as follows:

A bill (H. R. 13671) granting a pension to George Benjamin Corbin; Committee on Pensions discharged, and referred to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

A bill (H. R. 13703) granting a pension to Nettie L. Converse; Committee on Pensions discharged, and referred to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

PUBLIC BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

Under clause 3 of Rule XXII, public bills and resolutions were Introduced and severally referred as follows:

By Mr. HULL of Tennessee: A bill (H. R. 13742) amending section 1 of the interstate commerce act; to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

By Mr. HAWLET: A bill (H. R. 13743) conferring jurisdiction upon the Court of Claims to hear and determine claims of certain bands or tribes of Indians residing in the State of Oregon; to the Committee on Indian Affairs.

By Mr. JOHNSON of Oklahoma: A bill (H. R. 13744) to provide for the acquisition by Parker I-See-O Post, No. 12, AilAmerican Indian Legion, Lawton, Okla., of the east half, northeast quarter, northeast quarter, northwest quarter of section 20, township 2 north, range 11 west, Indian meridian, in Comanche County, Okla.; to the Committee on the Public Lands.

By Mr. LINTHICUM: A bill (H. R. 13745) for the grading and classification of clerks in the Foreign Service of the United States of America, and providing compensation therefor; to the Committee on Foreign Affairs.

By Mr. O'CONNELL: A bill (H. R. 13746) to provide a shorter work day on Saturday for postal employees; to the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads.

By Mr. TON: A bill (H. R. 13747) authorizing the Northwest Florida Corporation, Its successors and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across Perdido Bay, at or near Innerarity Point in Escambia County, Fla., to the mainland of Baldwin County, Ala.; to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

By Mr. HOWARD of Oklahoma: A bill (H. R. 13748) to carry Into effect the twelfth article of the treaty between the

United States and the Loyal Shawnee Indians proclaimed October 14, 1868; to the Committee on Indian Affairs.

By Mr. WHITE of Maine: A bill (H. R. 13749) to authorize the Secretary of Commerce to dispose of the marine biological station at Key West, Fla.; to the Committee on the Merchant Marine and Fisheries.

Also, a bill (H. R. 13750) to amend an act entitled "An act to require apparatus and operators for radio communication on certain ocean steamers," approved June 24. 1910, as amended by the act approved July 23, 1912; to the Committee on the Merchant Marine and Fisheries.

By Mr. RATHBONE: A hill (H. R. 13751) to provide for a survey of a route for the construction of a highway connecting certain places associated with the life of Abraham Lincoln; to the Committee on Roads.

By Mr. GIBSON: A bill (H. R. 13752) to provide for the construction of a children's tuberculosis sanatorium; to the Committee on the District of Columbia.

By Mr. HOWARD of Oklahoma: A bill (H.R. 13753) authorizing an expenditure of certain funds standing to the credit of the Cherokee Nation in the Treasury of the United States to be paid to one of the attorneys for the Cherokee Nation, and for other purposes: to the Committee on Indian Affnirs.

By Mr. ENGLAND: A bill (H. R. 13754) relating to the construction of a chapel at the Federal Industrial Institution for Women at Alderson, W. Va.; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. MEAD: A bill (H. R. 13755) to provide a shorter workday on Saturday for postal employees; to the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads.

By Mrs. LANGLEY: A bill (H. R. 1375G) relating to the naturalization and immigration of certain aliens; to the Committee on Military Affairs.

By Mr. THATCHER: A hill (H. R. 13757) to amend sections 116 and 118 of the Judicial Code, and for other purposes; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. COCHRAN of Missouri: Joint resolution (H. J. Res. 302) authorizing the President to appoint A. Campbell Turner to the Foreign Service of the United States; to the Committt'e on Foreign Affairs.

~By Mr. NELSON of Maine: Joint resolution (H. J. Res. 303) to amend joint resolution directing the Interstate Commerce Commission to take action relative to adjustment in the rate structure of common carriers subject to the interstate commerce act, and the fixing of rates and charges; to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

By Mr. LUCE: Concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 35) requesting the President of the United States to return H. K. 7475 to the House of Representatives, entitled "A bill to provide for the removal of the Confederate monument aud tablets from Greenlawn Cemetery to Garfield Park "; to the Committee ou the Library.

PRIVATE BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

Under clause 1 of Rule XXII, private bills and resolutions were introduced and severally referred as follows:

By Mr. AYRES: A bill (H. R. 13758) granting an increase of pension to Mary Alderdice; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. BRIGHAM: A bill (H. R, 13759) granting an increase of pension to Ada E. Pattin; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. CORNING: A bill (H. R. 13760) granting an increase of pension to Hannah Sayles; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. CROWTHER: A bill (H. R. 13761) granting a pension to Anna Corte; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. DOUGLASS of Massachusetts: A bill (H. R. 13762) for the relief of Mary Ann Meeker; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. EDWARDS: A bill (H. R. 13763) for the relief of Thomas 'W. Surrency; to the Committee on World War Veterans' Legislation.

Also, a bill (H. R. 13764) for the relief of Jason F. Purvis; to the Committee on World War Veterans' Legislation.

By Mr. HAWLEY: A bill (H. R. 13765) granting a pension to A. R. Cyrus; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. MILLIGAN: A bill (II. R. 13766) granting an Increase of pension to Maria Brannon; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. MOORE of Kentucky: A bill (H. R. 13767) for the relief of Joe B. Prince; to the Committee on Claims.

By Mr. PURNELL: A bill (H. R. 13768) granting a pension to Gertrude Muuhall; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. RATHBONE: A bill (H. R. 13769) for the relief of Joseph Sustowski; to the Committee on Claims.

Also, a hill (H. R. 13770) for the relief of Orville A. Yatcs; to the Committee on World War Veterans' Legislation.

By Mr. SPEAKS: A bill (H. R. 13771) granting a pension to Frank V. Griffith; to the Committee on Pensions.

By Mr. STALKER: A bill (H. R. 13772) granting an tnerense of pension to Elniina Ripley; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. VNDEHWOOD: A bill (H. R. 13773) granting a pension to Estelle Eby; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

Also, a bill (II. R. 13774) granting a pension to Ellen J. Bergeii: to tlie Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. WHITE of Maine: A bill (H. R. 13775) granting an iiK-rea.se of pension to Laura A. Na.son; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. WOODRUFF: A bill (H. R. 1377<i) to provide for examination and survey of Tnwas River, Mien.; to the Committee i'ii Rivers and Harbors.

By Mr. KNFTSON: Resolution (H. Res. 205) to pay Fred R. Miller for extra and expert, services to the Committee on Pensions: to the Committee on Accounts.

By Mr. REED of New York: Resolution (H. Res. 206) providing for the consideration of H. R. 132."il. a bill to provide for the vocational rehabilitation of disabled residents of the District of Columbia, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Rules.

PETITIONS, ETC.

tinder clause 1 of Rule XXII, petitions and papers were laid on the Clerk's desk and referred as follows:

7596. By Mr. BLOOM: Petition of the executive committee of the New York State Bar Association, adding their protest to the enactment of Senate bill 3151; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

75!)7. By Mr. CARTER: Petition of Porter Stanley and many others, of Oakland, Calif., protesting against the passage of House bill 78, the Sunday bill; to the Committee on the District of Columbia.

7598. Also, petition of O. E. Hotchkiss, and many others, of Oakland. Calif., protesting against the passage of House bill 78, known as the Sunday bill; to the Committee on the District of Columbia.

7599. By Mr. DEMPSEY: Petition by E. C. Harris and A. M. Vallmer, Educators Association, Buffalo, N. Y., protesting against passage of Senate bill 1752; to the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads.

7600. By Mr. GAHBER: Petition of General Council of the Apache, Kiowa, and Commanche Indians of Oklahoma, in regard to bill pending providing for the payment of the abovementioned tribes of the sum of $100,000; to the Committee on Indian Affairs.

7601. Also, petition of Opperud & Martin, by O. B. Martin, of Blackwell. Okla., in protest to the passage of Senate bill 1752: to the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads.

7602. By Mr. JOHNSON of Texas: Petition of W. B. Yeary, president Farmers Marketing Association of Texas, favoring House bill 5677, net weight cotton bill; to the Committee on Agriculture.

7603. By Mr. MAXLOVE: Petition signed by 83 citizens of Barry, Jasper, and Lawrence Counties. Mo.. Including Charles Mathis, H. W. Larkin, W. L. Coffin, and Mary McNeely, all of Verona, Mo.; Myrtle Joy, Mrs. J. L. Shoemaker, and Mrs. E. Miles, all of Oronogo, Mo.; A. J. Smith and Mrs. A. Foster, of Carl Junction, Mo.; V. A. Tunnel, Clifford Logan, and Claudia Hilton, all of Jenkins, Mo., protesting against the Lankford compulsory Sunday observance bill; to the Committee on the District of Columbia.

7604. Also, petition of Katharine K. Collins, Verona. Mo., favoring legislation granting Increases of pension to Civil War veterans and widows of veterans; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

7605. Also, petition signed by 138 citizens of Jasper County, Mo., including R. L. Cave, Arthur J. Bastian, George F. VViedemnn, John Pflug. Marion A. Coonrod, V. A. Newxom, E. M. Chapman, Mary V. Adams, and B. L. Lewis, all of Joplin, Mo., protesting against the Lankford compulsory Sunday observance bill: to the Committee on the District of Columbia.

7606. Also, petition of Mrs. 8. B. Converse and 30 other citizens of Aurora, Mo., urging the passage of a Civil War pension bill; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

7607. Also, petition of F. A. Nelson and 25 other citizens of Southwest City, Mo., urging the passage of a Civil War pension bill; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

7608. By Mr. O'CONNELL: Petition of George S. Silzer, chairman of the Port of New York Authority, opposing the passage of the Vinson bill (II. R. 1.'>04G) ; to the Committee on Agriculture.

7609. Also, petition of the General Harrison Gray Otis Post, No. 1537, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Pasadena, Calif., favoring the passage of House bill 0523; to the Committee on Military Affairs.

7610. By Mr. SPEAKS: Petition signed by C. W. Bodson and some 40 residents of Franklin County, Ohio, urging enactment of legislation for the relief of Civil War veterans and their dependents; ro the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

7611. By Mr. WILLIAMS of Missouri: Petition of P. C. Coffell and others, urging that immediate steps be taken to [ bring to a vote a Civil War pension bill carrying the rates proposed by the National Tribune; to the Committee on Pensions.

SENATE
Tuesday, May J.5,1928

(Legislature d<iy of Thursday, Mail 3, 1928)

The Senate reassembled at 12 o'clock meridian, on the expiration of the recess.

The VICE PRESIDENT. The Senate resumes the unfinished business, H. It. 1.

TAX REDUCTION

The Senate, as in Committee of the Whole, resumed the consideration of the bill (H. II. 1) to reduce and equalize taxation, provide revenue, and for oilier purposes.

Mr. SMOOT. Mr. President, there are a number of amendments that I intend now to propose Jo the bill. The amendments are mostly clerical in their nature. The committee authorized the experts to prepare the amendments, and I shall now offer them as the committee agreed to them. As I said, they are mostly clerical.

Mr. SIMMONS. I thought we agreed the other day that the experts were to make all necessary clerical corrections.

Mr. SMOOT. The Senator will remember that there were some amendments that were not clerical and some that were. I wanted to clean up those amendments now which we did not have prepared at the time the bill was reported. I am quite sure the Senator will not object to them, because in the committee we were almost unanimous—in fact, I think we were completely unanimous—in reporting them.

Mr. SIMMONS. I understand the purpose of the Senator is to perfect some majority amendments?

Mr. SMOOT. Yes.

Mr. SIMMONS. I do not object to that.

MESSAGE KI10M THE HOUSE

A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Chaffee, one of its clerks, announced that the House had agreed to the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H. R. 8126) to repeal the sixty-first proviso of section 6 and the last proviso of section 7 of "An act to establish the Mount McKinley National Park, in the Territory of Alaska," approved February 26, 1917.

ENROIXED BILLS SIGNED

The message also announced that the Speaker had affixed his signature to the following enrolled bills, and they were signed by the Vice President:

H. R. 126. An act to add certain lands to the Missoula National Forest, Mont.; and

H. R. 8105. An act to provide for the membership of the Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy, and for other purposes.

CAIX OF THE ROI.I,

Mr. LA FOLLETTE. Mr. President, I suggest the absence of a quorum.

The VICE PRESIDENT. The clerk will call the roll.

The legislative clerk called the roll, and the following Senators answered to their names:

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The VICK PRESIDENT. Eighty-six Senators having answered to their names, a quorum i.s present.

PETITION'S AND MEMORIALS

Mr. CURTIS presented a petition of sundry citizens of the State of Kansas, praying for the passage of the so-called Brookhnrt bill, being Senate bill 1667, relative lo the distribution of motion-picture films in the various motion-picture zones of the country, which was referred to the Committee on Interstate Commerce.

Mr. DKXEEN presented a memorial of members of the meclieal staff of the St. Francis Hospital, Evanston, 111., remonstrating against the proposed increase in the narcotic tax from .$1 to $3 in connection with the administration of the Harrison narcotic law, and favoring the adoption of the so-called Robinson amendment to ijeiuling tax legislation relative to taxes in connection with attendance upon professional meetings, which was referred to the Committee on Finance.

Mr. BLAIXE presented resolutions adopted by the County Board of Lafayette County, Wis., favoring the passage of legislation increasing the import duties on Swiss, brick, and limburger cheese about 50 per cent, which were referred to the Committee on Finance.

He also presented resolutions adopted by the Ashland and Marathon County Hoards of Supervisors, Wisconsin, favoring the raising of the tariff on cheese high enough so that the American farmer can compete with the Canadian farmer, which were referred to the Committee on Finance.

Mr. WATE11MAN presented a letter in the nature of a petition signed by representatives of various temperance organizations, which was ordered to lie on the table and to be printed In the Record, as follows:

Washington, D. C., May 12, ISK. Senator Charles W. Watkrmax,

Senate Office Building, Washington, D. C. In re: S. 2901.

Dear Senator Waterman: There Is pending on the Senate Calendar 8. 2901, introduced hy Senator Jones, of Washington, to increase the maximum penalties that may be Imposed In criminal prosecutions for the five offenses defined by the eighteenth amendment to the Constitution of the United States, namely, the manufacture, transportation, sale, importation, and exportation of Intoxicating liquors for beverage purposes.

Extended hearings have been held. The Assistant Attorney General In charge of prohibition enforcement, Mrs. Mabel Walker Willebrandt. and the Commissioner of Prohibition, Dr. 3. M. Doran, called before the committee, testified to the great need for Increased penalties In this class of offenses, as shown by experience. The National Legislative Conference, comprising 31 temperance organizations of the country, has rejieatedly gone on record In favor of legislation for Increased penalties in prohibition cases, and at Its last annual session In December in Washington voted unanimously to urge Its constituent bodies to support legislation for increased maximum penalties for these major offenses. Tills principle is found In S. 2001. The reasons for the passage of the bill are well stated In the attached report of the Senate Judiciary Committee (No. 768) recommending Its passage.

We earnestly request you to give consideration to this measure as thus reported by the Senate committee and to use your Influence to secure a vote upon it and its passage at tills session of Congress. This BUpporl will he deeply appreciated. Our views are stated in tile memorandum filed with the subcommittee. Hespectfully submitted.

Anti-saloon League or America,
By P. Scott McRiiiDE, Oeneral Superintendent.
Edward B. DrxKOno, Attorm-y.
International Ordku Op Good Templars.
Klyinu Squadron Foundation,
Committee On Promotion Op

Temperance Legislation In Conoress.
Association In Support Ok National Prohibition,
By Edwin C. Dinwiddie, LegMatire Representative.

National Woman's Christian Temperance Union,
By Klla A. Booi.k, President.

Lenna Lane Yost, Watliington Kepreientative.
Board Of Temperance And Social

Service Of The M. E. Church South,
By James Cannon, Jr., Chairman.
Euokne L. Crawford, Secretary.
International Reform Federation,
By Wm. Shear Chase, General Superintendent.

Mr. WATERMAN also presented various letters, telegram?, and resolutions favoring the passage of Senate bill 1289, the socalled universal draft bill, which were referred to the Committee on Military Affairs and ordered to be printed in the Kecobb, as follows:

American Legion Auxiliary, Ray Lines Unit, No. 64,

Salida, Colo., May S, im. Hon. Charles W. Waterman,

United Stales Senate, Washington, D. C.

Sir: The Ladles Auxiliary of the American Legion Post, No. 64, with 24 members, passed resolution at lust meeting requesting your support of the universal draft bill when brought before Congress for yote. Yours truly,

(Mrs.) Florence P. Stanley, Secretary.

The Windsor Community Ci.ru,

Windsor, Colo., April 28, MM. Hon. Charles W. Waterman,

Waslilniitou, D. C.

Dear Sir: At a meeting of the directors of the Windsor Community Club, a business men's organization composed of 100 members, the following resolution was unanimously adopted:

"Be it, and it is hereby, unanimously resolved by the Windsor Communiti/ Club, That we respectfully request our Representatives in the United States Congress give the universal draft bill their earnest consideration, and that we favor Its passage in whatever form seems advisable after such consideration ''; it Is further

Rfmlrrit, That a copy of this resolution be sent to our Representatives and Senators, viz, Hon. Lawrkncb C. Phipps, Hon. Charles W. Watkrman, and Hon. Charles B. Timbkrlake, all of Washington, D. C. Respectfully submitted.

The Windsor Community Club,
W. T. Boreino, Secretary.

Montevista, Colo, April ft, 1&8. Senator Charles W. Waterman,

Washington, D. C.:

Would appreciate your support universal draft bill, which we greatly favor.

James G. Hamilton Post, No. 53, American Lbcio.x.

Victor Candlin Post, No. 18, American Legion,

Orffley, Colo., April IS, 1928.

Be U resolved by Victor Candlin Pott, Ko. 18, the American Legion, Grrelfu, Colo., in meeting assembled, That the Congress of the United States of America should proceed to pass, without delay, n universal draft law, and that the measure presented to Congress be reported out of committee, considered, and enacted into law at the present session of Congress without further delay, and that a copy of this resolution be sent to the Senators and Representatives of Colorado in Congress.

Proctob Smith, Commander. Attest:

S. S. Trent, Adjutant.

Hay Lines Post, No. 64,

Salida, Colo., April 20, 1S8. Hon. Charles W. Waterman, ,

United States Senate, Washington, D. C.

Dear Sir: Ray Lines Post. No. 04, the American Legion, of Salida, Colo., consisting of 100 members, at its last meeting held April IS, voted unanimously lo request your complete support In bringing the passage of the universal draft bill, as well as working to force this bill out of committee. This request comes from 100 red-blooded patriotic Americans who feel that they want the passage of a law which will do more to end all wars than anything ever before brought up in Congress. Your support of this bill will, therefore, be expected. Very truly yours,

Carl M. Stanley, I'ost Adjutant.

Department Of Colorado, Thb American Legion,

Windsor, Colo., April IS, E>&. Hon. Charles W. Waterman,

Washington, D. C.

My Dear Senator: On behalf of the members of the American Legion of the State of Colorado I am writing you to ask for your support of the Capper-Johnson bill (the universal draft bill). Trusting that yon can give your whole-hearted support to this bill, which Is sponsored by every veteran of the World War. I remain,

Very truly yours,

II. M. Wolf,
Vice Comnumdcr the American licqion,

Department of Colorado.

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