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ins this sketch to our renders In the hope that It nil! encourage them to got behind this movement fop the early enactment of the Sunday rest bill for the District of Columbia. We might any that we have never Known him to falter or fail in ills efforts to secure every proper advantage for (he progress of (ho bill through the House of Representative.!.

IM'EItKSTKn IN OTIIKtt I'ROI'OSBD LEGISLATION

lo addition to the Sunday observance bill Mr. Lvnkfohd is giving special attention at tliis session of Congress to a bill to secure the construction of post-office buildings in towns with postal receipts of less than $10.11011; his idea being that n town with half the postal receipts just mentioned should have a small building so arranged as to be added to from time to time as the receipts increase. It is pointed out by Mr. Lankkorii that real estate can be bought and standardized buildings constructed more cheaply iu a small town than In a larger one, and it would he a real economy to erect such buildings, enlarging them from timfl to time.

Mr. LANKiroRD is also the author of a bill, and working to secure its passage, for the construction of a statue in the District of Columbia consisting of a group of figures of Presidents Abraham Lincoln and U. S. Grunt and Gens. Robert E. Lee and T. J. I Stonewall) Jacksou as a memorial of the good feeling and love now existing between the North and South and various parts of the Nation.

Since he came to Congress Mr. LANKFOim hns at all times given special attention to legislation in behnlf of the producers of the Nation and at the present time is the author of two bills now pending to enable the producers, by extension of the parcel-post system, to sell their products directly to the consuming public. In addition to these matters. Mr. Lankfukii is vitally interested in and working to secure the enactment of legislation for the creation of n new Federal district in Georgia, the development of harbor facilities, the prevention of erosion of the coast lines in bis district, and the construction of a canal from the Atlantic to the Gulf of Mexico across the southeastern part of Georgia and the Peninsula of Florida, together with various other mailers of local Interest in the State of Georgia.

The farm and labor Interests of the country have approved Mr. Lankfoko's record in Congress and recognize him an one of their best friends. He has never left Washington while Congress was in session and keeps in close touch with all the proceedings.

Last summer the Committee on Irrigation and Reclamation of the rioust\ of which I am a member, spent some time iu the West visiting various irrigation projects and studying conditions generally. We were royally entertained by the. gooJ people of that great sec-lion, and at least twice each day we were graciously invited to partake of the good food of that western country and were the recipients of the pleasures of most splendid public receptions. Of course, there were speeches on the program hy the entertainment committees the citizens present, and members of the congressional delegation. The newspapers made splendid mention of our trip from day to day. Among the many nice things said about the committee and myself. I am truly appreciative of the article carried by the Klamnth News, of Klamath Kails, Oreg.. under date of August 28, 1927, from which I quote us follows:

l.ANKFORD GREAT SPEAKER

Congressman Lankfoud, of Georgia, was the closing speaker and he la a wonderful liilker. No Chautauqua lecture, very few sermons ever delivered in Oregon, surpassed this brilliant southerner's speech at last evening's banquet. He told his listeners of the great fervor and love the South holds for tile West; how the Congressmen from down South stand firmly with the men from out West iu many places of legislation, lie stated that the location of Mason and Dlxon's Hue was where the cold light bread began on the north and the hot biscuits began on the south, politely culling attention that during the banquet hot biscuits had been served. In his southern eloquence lie then proclaimed that the Mason and Dixon's line must be located up about Canada some place.

He closed hid after-dinner talk with n few well-selected illustrations teaching the lessons of manhood, good citizenship, and religion.

The Eatonton Messenger, of Eatonton, Ga., on Friday. April 25. 192H, after criticizing some other Georgia papers for their stand on Sunday-observance legislation, made the following observations:

The bill of Mr. Lankpohd Is not a freak bill. It is in no wise fanatical in Its purpose*. It seeks to regulate business in Washington City, for which city Congress makes the laws or ordinances just as the city councils of Columbus or Brunswick do for those cities, so that the Sabbath day may l>e appropriately observed as a day of rest and religious worship separate from the other six dajs of the week.

It does not go further than to provide that business occupations, except those that have to be carried on for the public, shall not be conducted on Sundays. There is nothing about It resembling what la sometimes termed an awful "blue law" by persons who do not

appear to approve of any law tlint restrains them in doing a« they please, regardless of law or the rights of other people.

A day of rest once a week in this country is a necessity for people who work, not to m»ntion tho other purposes to which the Sabbath has been set aside, and as Washington Is the capital of the country, Washington should set an example of the Christian Sabbath; and If conditions in (hat city are as they are said to be the bill of Congressman La.nkfoiid is a very good one, indeed, and should he passed. It does not seem to contemplate anything more than the different States, including Georgia, have already done. Our esteemed contemporaries should remember that the Seventh Day Adveniista have shown they were fallible when several times in the past they fixed the day for the world to come to an end.

I next wish to quote from one of the periodicals published in New York City, and devoted to the interest of the movies and theaters, an article which was Intended as a criticism. Here is the item:

W. C. Lankfoed, Congressman from Douglas, Ga., near Atlanta, where the Ku-Klux originated, is opposed to Sunday movies, Sunday baseball, and everything except religions services on the Sabbath Day in the District of Columbia. Before the committee hearing the "blue law" pros and cons there he did not fall to tell the residents of Washington how they ought to spend their Sundays.

Lankfohd is the author of the "blue-Sunday hill" now pending in Congress, which provides "that it shall be unlawful In the District of Columbia to keep open or use any dancing saloon, theater (whether for motion pictures, plays, spoken or silent, opera, vaudeville, or entertainment), bowling alley, or any place of public assembly at which an admission fee Is directly or Indirectly received, or tc engage in commercialized sports or amusements on the Lord's Day, commonly called Sunday.

And this Is what that Georgian had to say—and more, too—to tho committee, while several hundred Washington business men and women, representatives of social and civic organizations, gathered to oppose his bill:

"I'M «;VILTY OF INTOLERANCE

"It is a new Idea that the present-day movies and shows and Sunday baseball are religious institutions, and that anyone who suggest* that there should be a law to prevent the operation of these on Sunday is guilty of religious Intolerance.

*' I confess that I am at a loss to know Just how I am guilty of religious intolerance when I propose a bill which would allow people of all and every denomination to go to church, if they wish, on Sunday, and only seek such provisions as will protect all in this enjoyment of religious liberty and freedom. Where is the religious intolerance which would prevent a crew of men operating a steam shovel or an electric hammer on a building site or partly constructed building next door to a church during services on Sunday? Where U the religious intolerance in a law which would not let a negro unload a large quantity of coal next door to a church, and thus disturb the assembly of people gathered for religious services? Where is the intolerance in a bill which makes for the most complete religious liberty and allows all and everyone to worship (tod according to the dictates of his or her own conscience? My purpose and hope is only to secure In a fuller sense the enjoynrent of religious liberty. Most people do not understand that religious liberty means Iho infliction on the public of the profanity of the pool room, the vulgarity of the modern movie or theater, and the obscenity of the ordinary dance hall on every Sunday of the year.

"The great trouble is that there are some folks who lielievc that freedom of religion is freedom from religion. They mistake freedom of religion for freedom of crime.

"The bill which I introduced provides for one day of rest out of every seven. If I provided for no rest day at all, there would rightly be much opposition. It would lie cruel and savage in the extreme to force all to work every day without any rest, and yet I am held up as an advocate of an unreasonable thing when I attempt to make by law one day of rest out of every seven.

"'AOIN' EVKRYTITIXO

"Because I am not willing for my people to pay taxes to build negro bathing beaches and artificial bathing pools here, and because I object to my ptople being forced to help maintain a negro university here in the District of Columbia contrary to law, I am said to be guilty of racial intolerance. It all depends on whose definition of intolerance we are to use. I do object to the public being forced to educate a crowd of negroes in Washington when many of the white boys and girls cf the South and other parts of the country are denied sufficient educational advantages. It has even been urged here that at public expense there be established a beauty parlor for the negroes of the llstrlct of Columbia, so that the negro girls could take lessons in using rouge and perfume, etc. Well, If objecting to this kind of thing Is Intolerance, then I am very Intolerant.

"I believe In letting the negro be the negro and the white man be the white mau. I believe in letting the negro uaviug his section of town to live In and the white people have theirs. I certainly believe in the negro having his own waiting room, his own car or separate seats on street earn and railroads, and his own schools, but I believe in the white people having also their own separate depot and transportation and educational facilities. Nothing could be fairer. Oh, but many say that there should be no distinction nnd that ull be treated alike. Segregation treats all alike."

Some two or three years ago I made certain criticisms of the efforts of tlie negroes of the country to shove themselves in where they are not wanted, and urged that thin action on their part brought about ill will between the ruces rather than good feeling, mid thus iujurr-d both.

Most of the negro papers carried my speech without comment. Some carried only quotations which left out much of the real argument of the speech. The Afro-American, of Baltimore, Md., carried the following item:

RIPRKSENTATIVE I.A.NKKOKI) (DKMorHAT, RKORHIA) VRCKS JIM CROW STREET CARS, TRAINS, ANn STATIONS IN DISTRICT OF COLCMIItA

Washington, February 14.--Representative William C. Lankforu (Democrat. (Jeorgla) told Congress last week he not only approved of President Lowell's stand of excluding negroes* from Harvard but also excluding them.from the white schools in the North.

Representative Lankford also took in the occasion to discuss the race problem, urging Jim Crow street cars, trains, libraries, and parks for the city. Among other things he said were:

"The so-culled 'Jim Crow' law, which makes whites and negroes ride In separate coaches on trains, use separate seats in street cars, and use separate waiting rooms at the stations, Is a most excellent law for both races.

"The best thing the negro race could do for Itself would be to say: 'Give us separate ears, separate waiting rooms, separate parks, separate schools, separate libraries, and separate sections of town to live in. We do not want to offend the white people in the least. They are our friends. We are theirs.'

"I iK'lieve the negroes tench their children here to be as offensive to the whites us possible. The old and the young of the Negro race here are doing well their part of building up a contempt of the white rnce for the negroes.

"The negroes of the North are destroying the chance they have by attempting to force themselves where they are not wanted and by being insolent and offensive. Many negroes In the South would not under any circumstances come in at the front door of a white home unless specifically requested to do so. They do not want to use a white waiting room or ride on a train in the white coach if It offends the white man or white woman or white child in the least. These kind of negroes are the saving power of the Negro race."

Representative I.ankkord complained that there was no space in Union Station where colored people were prohibited.

"Millions and millions of the people's money have been spent and are spent each year on dozens of most beautiful parks here in Washington, and most splendid music is furnished—lor whom? For only the whites who want to associate with negroes.

"Ob, the disgrace of the negro situation here in Washington! We have here In Washington a so-calli'd reformatory for girls. It is filled up with negro girls and a few white girls. In other words, If a white girl makes a mistake or does some wrong for which she should bo corrected she is forced to live with a bunch of negroes in order that she, a white girl, may be made better. The gang in authority in Washington who causes this to he done ought to be forced to eat with negroes, sleep with negroes, live with negroes, smell negroes, and work at hard labor with negroes in a penitentiary for and during the full end and term of their natural lives."

Mr. Speaker, the Negro race, by endeavoring to get more than it is entitled to, will eventually lose many of its rights. Uy infringing on the rights of the white race they built a resentment which will later deprive them of the rights of the negro.

In many sections where each race does not have well-defined rights and each stay strictly within them extreme hatred will arise and negroes will be driven from their homes, and even deprived of the right to live by the sway of nice riots. The occasional lynching of a guilty negro will not hurt the Negro race, but the all-cousnniing flame of raee hatred which is being kindled slowly but surely in many sections of the North, where the negro is attempting to push the white man aside, will hurt the Negro nice.

The negroes are enticed to their own schools, churches, libraries, public gatherings, parks, bathing beaches, waitingroom accommodations, and railway and other transportation conveniences unmolested by the white folks, and the white people are entitled to the same conveniences without, the interference of negroes.

The negro can not be white, neither will any considerable portion of the white race, either North or South, long con

sent to act the negro. The limitations fixed by the Almighty are steadfast and everlasting, and negro will remain negro and white will remain white. There should be rendered unto the negro the things that are his and unto the white man the things that are his. The white race, in all justice, will do this and only this, and the sooner the Iwtter.

SENATE BILL HKKHUUO)

A bill of the following title was taken from the Speaker's table and, under the rule, referred to the appropriate committee, as follows:

S. 2440. An act to provide that four hours shall constitute a day's work on Saturdays throughout the year for all employees in the Government Printing Office; to the Committee on Printing.

ENROLT.KD BILLS SIGNED

Mr. CAMPBELL, from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported that they had examined and found truly enrolled bills and a joint resolution of tha following titles, when the Speaker signed the same:

H. R, 2473. Ail act for the relief of Louie June;

II. R.4012. An act for the relief of Charles K. Sies;

H. H. 46GO. An act to correct the military record of Charles E. Lowe;

H. II. 4CS7. An act to correct the military record of Albert Campbell;

H. It. 4839. An act for the relief of the Press Publishing Co., Marianna, Ark.;

H. R. 5322. An act for the relief of John P. Stafford;

H. It. 5548. An act to authorize payment of six months' denth gnituity to dependent relatives of officers, enlisted men, or nurses whose death results from wounds or disease not resulting from their own misconduct;

H. R. 5044. An act to enable an enlisted man in the naval service to make good time lost in excess <>f one day under certain conditions;

H. R. 5718. An act to amend the act entitled "An act to readjust the pay and allowances of the commissioned and enlisted personnel of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Coast and Geodetic Survey, and Public Health Service";

H. R. 5820. An act authorizing the Secretary of the Navy, in his discretion, to deliver to the custody of the Louisiana State Museum, of the city of New Orleans, La., the silver bell in use on the cruiser A'eip Orlean»;

II. R. 5830. An act for the relief of Jesse W. Boisseau;

II. It. 0152. An act for the relief of Cromwell L. Barsley;

H. R. 6105. An act granting six months' pay to Constance D. Lathrop;

H. It. C842. An act for the relief of Joseph V. Friend:

H. R, <i854. An act to add certain lands to the Montezuma National Forest, Colo., and for other purposes;

H. It. 7142. An act for the relief of Frank E. Ridgely, deceased;

H. It. 78115. An act for the relief of the Lagrange Grocery Co.;

H. It. 7MI7. An act to ratify the action of a local board of sales control in respect of contracts between the United States and the West Point Wholesale Grocery Co.. of West Point, Gn.;

H. R. 78ftS. An act to ratify the action of a local board of sales control in resi>ect of contracts between the United States and the Lagrange Grocery Co.. of Lagrange, Ga.;

H. R. 7903. An act to authorize the erection ;it Clinton, Sampson County, N. C., of a tablet or marker in commemoration of William Rufus King, former Vice President of the United States;

H. 11.8031. An act for the relief of Higgins Lumber Co. (Inc.);

H. R. 8440. An act for the relief of F. C. Wallace;

H. R, !X>46. An act to continue the allowance of Sioux benefits;

H. 11. 9355. An act to provide for the acquisition of certain property in the District <>f Columbia for the Library of Congress, and for other purposes;

H. R. 9411. An act for the relief of Maurice P. Dimlnp;

H. R. 9020. An act for the relief of E. II. Jennings, F. L. Johanns, and Henry Blank, officers and employees of the post office at Charleston, S. C.;

H. R. 9965. An act to erect a tablet or marker to mark the site of the Battle of Kettle Creek, in Wilkes County. Ga.. where, on February 14, 1779, Elijah Clarke, of Georgia, and Colonel Picko.ns, of South Carolina, overtook the Tories under Colonel Boyd, killing him and many of his followers, thus ending British dominion in Georgia;

H. R. 10503. An act for the relief of R. P. Washam, F. A. Slate, W. II. Sanders, W. A. McGinuis, J. E. Lindsay, and J. T. Pearson;

H. R. 11405. An act to acquire an area of State land situate in Lessen Volcanic National Park, State of California, by exchange;

H. R. 11621. An act to authorize the Secretary of the Navy to advance public funds to naval personnel under certain conditions;

H. R. 11724. An act to provide for the paving of the Government road, known as the Riuggold Road, extending from Chickamauga ami Chattanooga National Military Park, in the State of Georgia, to the town of Ringgold, Ga.. constituting an approach road to the Chlckamanga and Chattanooga National Military Park;

H. R. 12087. An act to set aside certain lands for the Chippewa Indians in the State of Minnesota;

H. R. 12192. An act authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to accept a deed to certain land and issue patent, therefor to the city of Buhl. Twin Falls County, Idaho;

H. R. 12446. An act to approve a deed of conveyance of certain land in the Seneca Oil Spring Reservation. N. Y.; and

H. .T. Res. 263. Joint resolution authorizing the president and fellows of Harvard College to erect on public grounds in the District of Columbia a monument to Maj. Gen. Artemas Ward.

The SPEAKER announced his .signature to enrolled bills of the Senate of the following titles:

S. 744. An act to further develop an American merchant marine, to assure its permanence in the transportation of the foreign trade of the United States, and for other purposes;

S. 1828. An act to amend the second paragraph of section 5 of the national defense act, as amended by the act of September 22, 1922, by adding thereto a provision that will authorize the names of certain graduates of the General Service Schools and of the Army War College, not at present eligible for selection to the General Staff C'orps eligible list, to be added to that list;

S. 1829. An act to authorize the collection, in monthly installments, of indebtedness due the United States from enlisted men, and for other purposes;

S. 3463. An act to recognize commissioned service in the Philippine Constabulary in determining rights of officers of the Regular Army;

8.3555. An act to establish a Federal farm board to aid in the orderly marketing and in the control and disposition of the surplus of agricultural commodities in interstate and foreign commerce;

S. 3752. An act to amend section 3 of an act entitled "An act authorizing the use for permanent construction at military posts of the proceeds from the sale of surplus War Department real property, and authorizing the sale of certain military reservations, and for other purposes," approved March 12, 1926: and

S. 4216. An act to authorize the adjustment and settlement of claims for armory drill pay.

BILLS PRESENTED TO THE PRESIDENT

Mr. CAMPBELL, from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported that this day they presented to the President of the United States, for his approval, bills of the House of the following titles:

H. R. 5695. An act authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to equitably adjust the disputes and claims of settlers and others against the United States and between each other, arising from incomplete or faulty surveys in township 19 south, range 26 east, and in sections 7, 8, 17, 18, 19, 30, 31, township 19 south, range 27 east, Tallahassee meridian, Lake County, in the State of Florida;

H. R. 8110. An act withdrawing from entry the northwest quarter section 12, township 30 north, range 19 east, Montana meridian;

H. R. 9112. An act for the relief of William Roderick Dorsey and other officers of the Foreign Service of the United States, who, while serving abroad, suffered by theft, robbery, fire, embezzlement, or bank failures losses of official funds:

H. R. 0411. An act for the relief of Maurice P. Dunlap; and

II. R. 11022. An act to extend medical and hospital relief to retired officers and retired enlisted men of the United States Coast Guard.

ADJOURNMENT

Mr. FENN. Mr. Speaker, I move that the House do now.

adjourn.

The motion was agreed to; accordingly (at. 5 o'clock and 26 minutes p. m.) the House adjourned until to-morrow, Friday, May 18. 1928, at 12 o'clock noon.

COMMITTEE HEARINGS

Mr. TILSON submitted the following tentative list of committee hearings scheduled for Friday, May 18, 1928, as reported to the floor leader by clerks of the several committees:

COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY

(10.30 a. m.)

To amend the Judicial Code and to define and limit the jurisdiction of courts sitting in equity (H. R. 7759).

COMMITTEE ON BANKING AND CURRENCY

(10.30 a. m.)

To amend the act approved December 23, 1913, known as the Federal reserve act; to define certain policies toward which the powers of the Federal reserve system shall be directed; to further promote the maintenance of a stable gold standard; to promote the stability of commerce, industry, agriculture, and employment; to assist in realizing a more stable purchasing power of the dollar (H. R. 11806).

COMMITTEE ON NAVAL AFFAIRS

(10.30 a. m.)

To authorize the Secretary of the Navy to proceed with the construction of certain public works (H. R. 13319).

COMMITTEE ON RIVERS AND HARBORS

(10 a. m.)

To consider a report from the Chief of the Army Engineers on the proposal to deepen the Great Lakes channel.

COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE

(10 a. m.)

To provide overtime pay for employees in the Bureau of Animal Industry of the Department of Agriculture (H. R. 6509).

COMMITTEE ON INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE

(10.30 a. m.)

StinCOMMITTEB ON :; M I l;n Mrs

To amend and reenact subdivision (a) of section 209 of the transportation act, 1920 (H. R. 12177).

SUBCOMMITTEE ON I'l VI'IM M

(2 p. m.)

To regulate the marking of platinum imported into the United States or transported in interstate commerce (H. R. 5639).

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PUBLIC BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

Under clause 2 of Rule XIII,

Mr. WASON: Joint Committee on the Disposition of Useless Executive Papers. A report on the disposition of useless papers in the Department of Labor (Rept. No. 1713). Ordered to lie printed.

Mr. WASON: Joint Committee on the Disposition of Useless Executive Papers. A report on the disposition of useless papers in the Department of Commerce (Rept. No. 1714). Ordered to be printed.

Mr. WASON: Joint Committee! on the Disposition of Useless Executive Pai>ers. A report on the disposition of useless papers in the State Department (Rept. No. 1715). Ordered to be printed.

Mr. WASON: Joint Committee on the Disposition of Useless Executive Pai>ers. A report on the disposition of useless papers in the Navy Department (Rept. No. 1716). Ordered to be printed.

Mr. WASON: Joint Committee on the Disposition of Useless Executive Papers. A report on the disposition of useless papers in the Treasury Department (Rept No. 1717). Ordered to be printed.

Mr. HILL of Washington: Committee on the Public Lands. S. 3361. An act authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to convey to the city of Hot Springs, Ark., all of lot No. 3 in block No. 115 in the city of Hot Springs, Ark.; without amendment (Kept. No. 1718). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.

Mr. HILL of Washington: Committee on the Public Lands. H. R. 12775. A bill providing for a grant of laud to the county of Snn Juan, in the State of Washington, for recreational and public-park purposes; with amendment (Rept. No. 1719). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.

Mr. ZIIILMAN: Committee on the District of Columbia. H. .T. Res. 276. A joint resolution to authorize the merger of street railway corporations operating in the District of Columbia, and for other purposes; with amendment (Kept. No. 1720). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.

Mr. 8UMNER8 of Texas: Committee on the Judiciary. H. R. 1202H. A bill to create n new division of the District Court of the United States for the Northern District of Texas; without amendment (Kept. No. 1721). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.

Mr. McLEOD: Committee on the District of Columbia. S. 2306. An act to amend subchapter 1 of chapter 18 of the Code of Laws for the District of Columbia relating to degree-conferring institutions; with amendment (Kept. No. 1722). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.

Mr. LKAVITT: Committee on Indian Affairs. S. 3593. An act to authorize the leasing or sale of lands reserved for agency, schools, and other purposes on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Mont.; with amendment (Rept. No. 1723). Referred to the House Calendar.

Mr. COLTON: Committee on (lie Public Lands. S. 3770. An net to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to issue patents for lands held under color of title: without amendment (Rept. No. 1727). Referred to (lie Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.

Mr. ENGLEBRIGHT: Committee on Indian Affairs. S. 4321. An act authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to dispose of two bridges on the San Carlos Indian Reservation, in Arizona, and for other purposes; without amendment (Rept. No. 1728). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PRIVATE BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

Under clause 2 of Rule XIII,

Mr. HOOPER: Committee on the Public Lands. S. 3954. An act to quiet title in the heirs of Norbert Boudousquie to certain lands in Louisiana; without amendment (Rept. No. 1712). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House.

Mr. LEAVITT: Committee on Indian Affairs. H. R. 12312. A bill for the relief of James Hunts Along; with amendment (Rept. No. 1724). Referred to the Committee of the Whole H< i use.

Mr. HOOPER: Committee on War Claims. S. 456. An act to carry out the findings of the Court of Claims in the case of Edward I. Gallagher, of New York, administrator of the estate of Charles Gallagher, deceased; without amendment (Hept. No. 1725). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House.

Mr. LKAVITT: Committee 011 Indian Affairs. H. R. 13006. A bill for the relief of Russell White Bear: without amendment (Rept. No. 172C). Referred to the Committee of the Whole Hoifc'e.

Mr. HOWARD of Oklahoma: Committee on Indian Affairs. S. 3794. An act for the relief of II. E. Hansen: without amendment (Kept. No. 1729). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House.

Mr. HOWARD of Oklahoma: Committee on Indian Affairs. H. R. 13753. A bill authorizing an expenditure of certain funds standing to the credit of the Cherokee Nation in the Treasury of the United States to be paid to one of the attorneys for the Cherokee Nation, and for other purposes; without amendment (Rept. No. 1730). Referred to the Committee of the Whole House.

PUBLIC BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

Under clause 3 of Rule XXII. public bills and resolutions were introduced and severally referred as follows:

By Mr. ANDRESEN: A bill (H. R. 13845) to amend section 313 of the tariff act of 1922, approved September 21, 1922; to the Committee on Ways and Means.

By Mr. OLDFIELD: A bill (H. R. 13846) granting the consent of Congress to (he Arkansas Highway Commission to construct, maintain, and oiierate a free highway bridge across the Spring River at or near Miller Ford, Ark.; to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

Also, a bill (H. R. 13847) granting the consent of Congress to the Arkansas Highway Commission to construct, maintain, and operate a free highway bridge across the Spring River at or near Rliea Ford, Ark.; to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

By Mr. BOWMAN: A Bill (H. R. 13848) to legalize a bridge across the Potomac River at or near Paw Paw, W. Va.; to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

By Mr. STRONG of Kansas: A bill (H. R. 13849) to provide that transferors for collection of negotiable instruments shall be preferred creditors of national banks in certain cases; to the Committee on Banking and Currency.

By Mr. KENT: A bill (H. R. 1,1850) to further amend the act of March 4, 1925, as amended March 3, 1926, and April 6, 1926, to provide for the relief of the Bethlehem Steel Co., and to further carry out the provisions of the award of the National War Labor Board of July 31, 1918, and the action of the War Department Claims Board of July 0, 1921; to the Committee on Claims.

By Mr. ZIHLMAN: A bill (H. R. 138T>1) to provide for the election of a board of education of the District of Columbia, anil for other purposes; to the Committee on the District of Columbia.

By Mr. DICKSTEIN: A bill (H. R. 13S52) to amend section 2GG of the Judicial Code; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. JAMES: A bill (II. R. 13853) to authorize the Secretary of War to sell to the Fishers Island Corporation u tract of land comprising part of (he Fort II. G. Wright Military Reservation, N. Y.; to the Committee on Military Affairs.

By Mr. KINDRED: A bill (H. R. 13S54) to provide facilities and equipment in the Capitol for the emergency treatment of ill and injured persons; to the Committee on Accounts.

By Mr. FISH: A bill (H. R. 13805) to amend an act of February 9, 1907, entitled "An act to define the term 'registered nurse' and to provide for the registration of nurses in the District of Columbia "; to the Committee on the District of Columbia.

By Mr. LARSEN: A bill (H. 11. 13856) authorizing H. G. Martin, W. P. Calhoun, .1. H. Kaplin. R. L. O'Neal. <). J. Whipple. H. G. McBride, J. B. Brown, and Idus Jones, their heirs, legal representatives, or assigns, to construct a bridge across 1he Altamaha River at or near Towns Bluff Ferry in Jeff Davis and Montgomery Counties, Ga.; to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

By Mr. FORT: A bill (H. R. 13857) to amend the act entitled "An act for the relief of contractors and subcontractors for the post offices and other buildings and work under the supervision of the Treasury Department and for other purposes." approved August 25, 1919, as amended; to the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds.

By Mr. CRAMTON: Joint resolution (H. J. Res. 307) to preserve for development the potential water power and park facilities of the gorge and great falls of the Potomac River; to the Committee on the District of Columbia.

By Mr. TIMBERLAKE: Resolution (H. Res. 210) to pay six months' salary aud $250 to the widow of David Beattie, late an employee of the House of Representatives; to the Committee on Accounts.

By Mr. BLACK of New York: Resolution (H. Res. 211) to recognize the Nationalist Government as the Government of China; to the Committee on Foreign Affairs.

By Mr. DEMPSEY: Resolution (H. Res. 212) for the appointment of a committee to investigate (he shooting of Jacob D. Hanson, of Niagara Falls, N. Y., on May 5. 1928; to (lie Committee on Rules.

PRIVATE BILLS AND RESOLUTION'S

Under clause 1 of Rule XXII, private bills and resolutions were introduced and severally referred as follows:

By Mr. CROSSER: A bill (H. R. 13858) granting a pension to Pearl A. Phearson; to the Committee on Pensions.

By Mr. DAVENPORT: A bill (II. R. 13859) granting an increase of pension to Charlott K. Vought; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. ROY G. FITZGERALD: A bill (H. R. 13860) granting a pension to Katherine Z. Bates; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. GUYER: A bill (H. R. 138C1) granting a pension to Joseph McDonald; to the Committee on Pensions.

By Mr. HALL of Illinois: A bill (H. R. 13862) making eligible for retirement, under the same conditions us now provided for officers of the Regular Army, A. Richard Hedstrom, chaplain, an officer (if the United States Army during the World War, who incurred physical disability in line of duty; to the Committee on World War Veterans' Legislation.

By Mr. HOPE: A bill (H. R. 13803) granting a jx-nsion to Jennie L. Dockum; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. JOHNSON of Indiana: A bill (H. R. 13S04) granting a pension to Charles M. Barnes; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. MONAST: A bill (H. R. 13805) granting an Increase of pension to Bridget Deady; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. NEWTON: A bill (H. R. 13800) for the relief of Adelaide (Ada) J. Walker Robbins; to the Committee on Military Affairs.

By Mr. PRATT: A bill (IT. R. 138(571 for the relief of William 11. Baldwin: to the Committee on Claims.

By Mr. SMITH: A bill (II. It. 13808) granting a pension to Homer Rounds: to the Committee on Pensions.

By Mr. STKKLK: A bill (H. R. 13809) for the relief of John Wesley Clnrk: to Ihe Committee on Claims.

By Mr. VI.\CKNT of Michigan: A bill (II. R. 13870) grunting an increase of pension to Rosalie Smith; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. WOLVKRTON: A bill (H. R. 13871) granting an increase of pension to Mary A. Heck; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

By Mr. BURDICK: A bill (H. R. 13S72) for the relief of James J. (Jianaros; to the Committee on Military Affairs.

PETITIONS, ETC.

Under clause 1 of Rule XXII. petitions mid papers were laid on the Clerk's desk and referred as follows:

7(>83. By Mr. DAVENPORT: Petition of A. A. Wetherill nnrt other citizens of Westmoreland, N. Y., urging the passage of House bill 11-110, an amendment to the national prohibit ion act; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

7tW4. By Mr. DRAKE: Petition of citizens of Tampa, Fla., against compulsory Sunday observance bill (H. R. 78); to the Committee on the District of Columbia.

7(!S;-(. By Mr. ESTKP: Resolutions adopted by the Chamber of Commerce of Pittsburgh, Pa., following a report by the builders' council of the chamber, opposing House bill 11141, a bill to require contractors and subcontractors engaged in public work of the I'nited States to give certain preferences in the employment of labor, signed by W. F. Trimble, jr., first vic« chairman; R. M. Morganstern. second vice chairman of builders' council: and A. V. Snell, secretary of the Pittsburgh Chamber of Commerce, of Pittsburgh: to the Committee on Labor.

7680. By Mr. (iARBEK: Petition of E. L. Gallaher, of Covington, Okla.. secretary of Seventh District Chiropractic Association, in support of Senate bill 3036 and House bill 12047, if passed as amended, by Dr. J. Ralph John, of Baltimore, Md.; to the Committee on the District of Columbia.

7(i87. Also, petition of William G. Adams, secretary Travelers' National Legislative Committee, New York, in support of Senate bill OOH and House bill 5588; t» the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

7688. Also, petition of H. B. Fell, president Oklahoma Department, Reserve Officers' Association. Ardmore, Okla., asking that a reserve division be provided in the War Department; to the Committee on Military Affairs.

7t>8!>. Also, petition of carriers and ladies' auxiliary of Grant, Gartleld, Kay, and Noble Counties, assembled at Jefferson, Okla.. in regard to retirement bill for carriers; to the Committee on the Post Cilice and Post Roads.

7090. Also, petition of James A. Coe, druggist, Oshkosh, Wis., in support of the Capper-Kelly bill; to the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce.

7091. Also, petition of commitUe of Okmulgee County Medical Society, in opposition to the proposed increase in narcotic tax from $1 to $3 per year; to the Committee on Ways and Means.

7(>!»2. Also, telegram of board of directors, chamber of commerce. Hobart, Okla., asking that annual appropriation bill allow Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache Indians $50 per capita semiannual!}1, as $25 is insufficient to meet living expenses; to the Committee on Indian Affairs.

7<>J>3. Also, petition of Mrs. Roy Axtell. unit legislative chairman. Gut line, Okla., in support of universal draft bill; to the Committee on Military Affairs.

7694. By Mr. JOHNSON of Indiana: Petition of voters of Vermilion County, Ind., for the increase of Civil War pensions; to the Committee on Invalid Pensions.

7G9r>. By Mr. KVALE: Petition of Otto Strom. Edward Abbott, and Carl Larson, of Willmar. Minn., and Lars A. Kronlokken, Renville, Minn., urging enactment of legislation providing for Government operation of Muscle Shoals; to the Committee on Military Affairs.

7fiOO. By Mr. LINDSAY: Petition of Bayway Terminal. New York City, protesting against passage of House bill 130J(i, entitled "Cotton futures trading act," as damaging to their interests; to the Committee on Agriculture.

7697. Also, petition of Maritime Association, New York, strongly protesting against House bill IXOIO. known as the cotton futures trading act, as having detrimental effect on trade and commerce of the port of New York; to the Committee on Agriculture.

7608. Also, petition of Port of New York Authority, protesting against House bill 1,'!(>4<> as highly prejudicial to the port of New York: to the Committee on Agriculture.

7699. By Mr. MORRO\V: Petition of New Mexico Cattle and Horse Growers' Association, requesting an increase in appn>priation to the Bureau of Biological Survey for work in controlling predatory animals and noxious rodents; to the Committee on Appropriations.

7700. By Mr. O'CONNELL: Petition of the American Fluoride Corporation, New York City, favoring legislation which has for its object the investment of the Post Office Department with discretion in the mailing of merchandise now classed with the poisons; to the Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads.

7701. Also, petition of Conrad H. Lang, jr., of Hoboken, N. J., favoring the passage of the Edwards bill (S. 245H) ; to the Committee on World War Veterans' Legislation.

7702. Also, petition of the National Council. Traveling Salesmen's Association, New York City, favoring the passage of Senate bill 668 and House bill 5588, for the repeal of the war-time Pullman surcharge; to the Committee on Ways and Means.

7703. Also, petition of J. C. Penney, of New York City. favorIng the passage of House bill 1095S. to place a tax on butter made from nuts and products other than milk: to the Committee on Agriculture.

7704. By Mr. ROBINSON of Iowa: Petition signed by J. S. Hunt, of Dundee, Iowa, and about 30 other citizens of Delaware County, Iowa, urging action be taken on the national-origins provision of the restrictive immigration act of 1924; to the Committee on Immigration and Naturalization.

SENATE

Friday, May 18, 1M8
(Lcgixlattre day of Thursday, May 3, 19 >X)

The Senate reassembled at 12 o'clock meridian, on the expiration of the recess.

CORRECTION OF ERROR IN ENROLLMENT

The VICE PRESIDENT. The Chair lays before the Senate a concurrent resolution from the House of Representatives, which will be read.

The concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 38) was read, as

follows:

Bciinlri'd It;/ the Hounf of Rrprrsrntnlirrs (the Rotate com lining), That itu1 action of the Speaker of the House of Kepresent-itivi-s and of the Vice President In signing the bill (II. It. J'DGS) entitled "An act to authorize the pureliase at private sale of n tract of land in Louisiana, ami for other purposes,'1 be rescinded, and that in the roenrollment of such hill the Dumber "58" be stricken out and the mimbi-r "158" be inserted In lieu thereof.

Mr. CURTIS. 1 ask unanimous consent for the immediate consideration of the concurrent resolution.

The concurrent resolution was considered by unanimous consent and agreed to.

MESSAGE FROM THE HOUSE

A message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Hnltignn, one of its clerks, announced that the House had passed without amendment the following bills of the Senate:

S. 3793. An act authorizing the St. Croix Interstate Bridge Co., its successors and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across the St. Croix River near Grantsburg, Wis.;

S. 4345. An act authorizing the Interstate Bridge Co., its successors and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across the Missouri River at or near Kansas City, Kans.;

S. 4357. An act authorizing Henry Horsey, Winfleld Scott, A. L. I'.allegoin, and Frank Sehee, their heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, to construct and operate u bridge across the Des Moines River at or near Croton, Iowa; and

S. 4381. An act authorizing H. A. Hinder, his heirs, legal representatives, and assigns, to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge across the Missouri River at or near Niobrara, Nebr.

The message also announced that the House had agreed to the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H. R. 3470) granting relief to Havert S. Sealy and Porteus H. Hurke.

The message further announced that the House had passed a bill (H. R. 13512) to amend the act entitled "An act to create the Inland Waterways Corporation for the purpose of carrying out the mandate and purpose of Congress, as expressed In sections 201 and 500 of the transportation act, and for other puriHKses." approved June 3, 1024, in which it requested the concurrence of the Senate.

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